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Stephen G Breyer

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NEWS
June 10, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer promised the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday that he did not believe in "judicial activism." "The judiciary is ill-equipped to make broad-reaching policy determinations," the Boston judge said in the standard questionnaire submitted to the committee for which he once worked. "A judge seeking to solve a general social problem is less likely to have available all the relevant facts than a Legislature or executive entity," he added.
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NATIONAL
February 18, 2012 | By David G. Savage and Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer was at his Caribbean vacation home late in the evening one recent Thursday when a man wielding a machete cut his way through a screen door, walked into the living room and demanded "money, money, money," according to Colin Smith, the gardener. The thief on the island of Nevis "looked more nervous than we were," Mary-Anne Sergison-Brooke, Breyer's sister-in-law, said in an interview from her home near Oxford, England. "Nevis is such a nice, friendly island.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer on Wednesday sought to dispel the widespread public notion that judges rule under the influence of politics, deeming that impression "grossly distorted. " "I never get to say what I think is good. It's much more complicated than that," he told an audience at the Los Angeles Public Library in a town hall-style exchange. Breyer, appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1994, said some of the Supreme Court's most vilified decisions through history were the disastrous results of judges pursuing political objectives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer on Wednesday sought to dispel the widespread public notion that judges rule under the influence of politics, deeming that impression "grossly distorted. " "I never get to say what I think is good. It's much more complicated than that," he told an audience at the Los Angeles Public Library in a town hall-style exchange. Breyer, appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1994, said some of the Supreme Court's most vilified decisions through history were the disastrous results of judges pursuing political objectives.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White House officials met Thursday with U.S. Appeals Court Judge Stephen G. Breyer in a Boston hospital room, signaling that the nearly three-month-long search for a new Supreme Court justice may be winding down. Breyer, injured in a bicycling accident, was released Thursday night from Mount Auburn Hospital and will travel to Washington today for a face-to-face meeting with President Clinton, aides said.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2012 | By David G. Savage and Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer was at his Caribbean vacation home late in the evening one recent Thursday when a man wielding a machete cut his way through a screen door, walked into the living room and demanded "money, money, money," according to Colin Smith, the gardener. The thief on the island of Nevis "looked more nervous than we were," Mary-Anne Sergison-Brooke, Breyer's sister-in-law, said in an interview from her home near Oxford, England. "Nevis is such a nice, friendly island.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Mandatory minimum sentences passed by Congress are "bad policy" because they are unfair in some cases, Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer said. Breyer, a member of the U.S. Sentencing Commission in the 1980s, said there must be flexibility for exceptional cases. In a speech to about 550 people in Boston, Breyer said Congress had passed statutes with "no room for flexibility on the downside."
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | Associated Press
Live cable television coverage is planned for Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer's confirmation hearing today before the Senate Judiciary Committee. CNN and Court TV plan to carry opening statements, with Court TV returning to the hearing for key portions. C-SPAN will air the hearing from 7 a.m. PDT until 9 a.m., and will carry a full taped replay of the proceedings beginning at 5 p.m.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | Associated Press
Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer was praised by the American Bar Assn. but called an insensitive extremist by consumer activist Ralph Nader as his confirmation hearing ended Friday. Twenty-one witnesses testified for or against Breyer's nomination during a day in which most of the Senate Judiciary Committee's 18 members spent little time in the hearing room.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Stephen G. Breyer was sworn in as the nation's 108th Supreme Court justice Wednesday at a private ceremony at Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's Vermont summer home. Breyer's wife, Joanna, was the only witness at the swearing-in, conducted by Rehnquist, court spokeswoman Toni House said. Breyer replaces Justice Harry A. Blackmun, whose retirement took effect when Breyer took the two oaths required by the Constitution and the Judiciary Act of 1789.
OPINION
July 21, 2005
Re "Bush Leans Right in Court Pick," July 20 It didn't take long for the usual "hate groups" to come out against the Supreme Court nomination of a relatively moderate conservative, John G. Roberts Jr. The question now is, will Democratic senators show civility like the Republican senators did with the nominations of the far-left choices of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer, or will they fight his nomination with the partisan ugliness they...
NATIONAL
September 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Mandatory minimum sentences passed by Congress are "bad policy" because they are unfair in some cases, Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer said. Breyer, a member of the U.S. Sentencing Commission in the 1980s, said there must be flexibility for exceptional cases. In a speech to about 550 people in Boston, Breyer said Congress had passed statutes with "no room for flexibility on the downside."
NEWS
December 13, 2000
Justice Breyer, with whom Justice Stevens and Justice Ginsburg join except as to Part I-A-1, and with whom Justice Souter joins as to Part I, dissenting. * The court was wrong to take this case. It was wrong to grant a stay. It should now vacate that stay and permit the Florida Supreme Court to decide whether the recount should resume. I The political implications of this case for the country are momentous. But the federal legal questions presented, with one exception, are insubstantial.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The two former Los Angeles police officers who are trying to avoid more prison time for the beating of motorist Rodney G. King found an unlikely ally Tuesday at the Supreme Court in Justice Stephen G. Breyer, a moderate-liberal appointed by President Clinton. Breyer, joined by several justices, commented during the oral argument of the case that trial judges should have flexibility to set the proper sentence, especially in unusual cases.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court term that is expected to end Thursday has seen the emergence of new personalities on the bench and the transformation of a few veterans. Here is a look at some key figures during the '94-95 term. Professor Breyer: The newest member of the court, Stephen G. Breyer, hardly acted like the quiet rookie. From his first day, Breyer beamed with confidence. He often took it upon himself to summarize an hourlong argument, sounding as though no one at that moment had it quite right.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer pledged Friday to work to enhance the public's trust in the nation's justice system "for it is the very foundation of the rule of law." Breyer, guest of honor at a White House ceremony, repeated the constitutional oath he took at Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's vacation cottage Aug. 3--the day Breyer officially became a justice.
OPINION
July 21, 2005
Re "Bush Leans Right in Court Pick," July 20 It didn't take long for the usual "hate groups" to come out against the Supreme Court nomination of a relatively moderate conservative, John G. Roberts Jr. The question now is, will Democratic senators show civility like the Republican senators did with the nominations of the far-left choices of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer, or will they fight his nomination with the partisan ugliness they...
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer pledged Friday to work to enhance the public's trust in the nation's justice system "for it is the very foundation of the rule of law." Breyer, guest of honor at a White House ceremony, repeated the constitutional oath he took at Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's vacation cottage Aug. 3--the day Breyer officially became a justice.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Stephen G. Breyer was sworn in as the nation's 108th Supreme Court justice Wednesday at a private ceremony at Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's Vermont summer home. Breyer's wife, Joanna, was the only witness at the swearing-in, conducted by Rehnquist, court spokeswoman Toni House said. Breyer replaces Justice Harry A. Blackmun, whose retirement took effect when Breyer took the two oaths required by the Constitution and the Judiciary Act of 1789.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate voted overwhelmingly Friday to confirm Stephen G. Breyer for a seat on the Supreme Court, making him President Clinton's second appointment to the high court in a year. The 87-9 vote ensures that Breyer, 55, who has been chief judge of the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston, can join the court for the start of its fall term in October. He is expected to be sworn in next week, when he will become the nation's 108th justice. He replaces the retiring Harry A. Blackmun.
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