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Stephen Garey Associates

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BUSINESS
December 5, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Stephen Garey is still haunted by one ad campaign that he wrote. The Los Angeles ad man received a phone call from a buddy at General Electric's nuclear systems division back in the mid-70s. GE wanted an aggressive campaign aimed at shortening the 8-year waiting period that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission required before approving new nuclear power plants. Garey, who was just beginning to build his career, jumped at the chance to make a lot of money.
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BUSINESS
December 5, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Stephen Garey is still haunted by one ad campaign that he wrote. The Los Angeles ad man received a phone call from a buddy at General Electric's nuclear systems division back in the mid-70s. GE wanted an aggressive campaign aimed at shortening the 8-year waiting period that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission required before approving new nuclear power plants. Garey, who was just beginning to build his career, jumped at the chance to make a lot of money.
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NEWS
May 23, 1991 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man in the gray flannel suit is now wearing green. Madison Avenue is becoming interested in the environment. Here in California, we have, as might be expected, a leading example of this sort of thing. I'm not talking about Exxon ads showing us that the Valdez spill wasn't so bad after all. I'm talking about an advertising agency, Stephen Garey Associates of Santa Monica, which subjects potential clients to an ecological third degree before taking them on.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some surprising anti-war activists--including 19 American businesses--are turning to advertising to protest Bush Administration policy in the Persian Gulf. Earlier this week, a diverse group of businesses ranging from Ben & Jerry's ice cream on the East Coast to LA Weekly on the West Coast placed a $35,000 full-page ad in the New York Times that called the conflict "an unnecessary war."
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The "green" marketing movement--still in its infancy--is turning brown. Battered by recession-ravaged consumers and confusion over environmental product claims, marketers who embraced the environment as the great sales tool of the decade are discovering that instead of saving the Earth, more consumers today are concerned with saving a few cents.
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