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Stephen Geon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Los Angeles police officers have been charged with use of excessive force in the death of a transient in MacArthur Park last year, after witnesses said the officers beat and kicked the man, shoved him against a wall, allowed him to fall face down on the pavement after handcuffing him, and stuffed him head first into a shopping cart. Raymond Diaz Triana, age and hometown unknown, was pronounced dead at Queen of Angels hospital 90 minutes after the incident began last New Year's Day.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A transient arrested for throwing bottles in MacArthur Park died at the hands of police, according to a forensic pathologist consulted by the Los Angeles district attorney's office. "My opinion is that but for what happened during his arrest, he would not have died at that time," said the pathologist, Dr. Irving Root of the San Bernardino County coroner's office. "He had a pre-existing subdural hematoma (bleeding beneath the skull) which re-bled during this series of episodes."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A transient arrested for throwing bottles in MacArthur Park died at the hands of police, according to a forensic pathologist consulted by the Los Angeles district attorney's office. "My opinion is that but for what happened during his arrest, he would not have died at that time," said the pathologist, Dr. Irving Root of the San Bernardino County coroner's office. "He had a pre-existing subdural hematoma (bleeding beneath the skull) which re-bled during this series of episodes."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Los Angeles police officers have been charged with use of excessive force in the death of a transient in MacArthur Park last year, after witnesses said the officers beat and kicked the man, shoved him against a wall, allowed him to fall face down on the pavement after handcuffing him, and stuffed him head first into a shopping cart. Raymond Diaz Triana, age and hometown unknown, was pronounced dead at Queen of Angels hospital 90 minutes after the incident began last New Year's Day.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Officer Henry J. Cousine--a police ring on his finger, an LAPD tattoo on his leg and battle scars on his body--says the officers accused of beating Rodney G. King swung their batons like "little girls." Then he ticks off some of his own episodes of violence during a decade as a beat cop: three fights and three shootings. "You get in my face, I'm going to fight back," Cousine said. "You swing at me, I'm going to knock you off your feet. And you pull a gun, I'll kill you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charges were dropped Wednesday against two Los Angeles police officers accused of using excessive force in the death of a transient in MacArthur Park last year after new evidence was presented to the district attorney's office. "We felt we could not prove that their actions caused the man's death," Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph Shidler said after reviewing 2,000 pages of transcripts from a Police Department Board of Rights hearing held in March.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three miles, the police officers chased the car, sirens blaring. When the suspect finally stopped, as the officers would explain it later, he ignored their orders and tried to bull his way past them. Five bystanders told a starkly different story: the policemen beat and kicked an unarmed black man as he lay on the street. It was not Rodney G. King whom the witnesses saw being pummeled that night in 1988, but a suspected auto thief named Tyrone Demetri Carey.
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