Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen Glass
IN THE NEWS

Stephen Glass

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
February 1, 2014
Re "Glass - new media scapegoat," Opinion, Jan. 30 Meghan Daum misses an important point in the California Supreme Court's refusal to give disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass membership in the California State Bar. She says that his punishment seems particularly severe. On the contrary, his only "punishment" was to be denied the privilege of working as an attorney in California. The court did not intend to comment on his suitability for any other kind of employment. Glass' powers of persuasion got him a job as a paralegal, consent by the State Bar Court to his admission as an attorney and many glowing testimonials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "When lawyers go bad," Opinion, Feb. 11 Yale law student Jane Chong needs to go back to class if she thinks that disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass should be granted a law license in California because current unethical members of the bar did equally bad or worse things. That's a losing argument in any court, whether legal or that of public opinion. Chong misses the salient reason for Glass' unacceptability. An attorney's ethics are challenged in nearly every case, whether in trying to set a criminal client free or in efforts to represent an alleged corporate wrongdoer.
Advertisement
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "When lawyers go bad," Opinion, Feb. 11 Yale law student Jane Chong needs to go back to class if she thinks that disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass should be granted a law license in California because current unethical members of the bar did equally bad or worse things. That's a losing argument in any court, whether legal or that of public opinion. Chong misses the salient reason for Glass' unacceptability. An attorney's ethics are challenged in nearly every case, whether in trying to set a criminal client free or in efforts to represent an alleged corporate wrongdoer.
OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By Jane Chong
Last month the California Supreme Court denied disgraced journalist and serial confabulist Stephen Glass admission to the state bar. That decision has drawn attention to a topic that usually commands very little: what it takes, ethically speaking, to be a lawyer. Lawyers are supposed to live and die by a number of hard-and-fast ethical rules. Every jurisdiction in the country holds lawyers to some version of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and if they fail in that, the theoretical result is disbarment - "the death penalty," in lawyer lingo.
OPINION
July 10, 2012
Re "Stephen Glass' fragile dream," Column One, July 4 As a member in good standing of the state bar of California, your article about Stephen Glass made my blood boil. The overwhelming majority of California lawyers are honest individuals who suffer the brickbats about lawyers because of the misdeeds and crimes of a few. The last thing we need is to admit a habitual liar. There are many people who have suffered considerably worse treatment than the upbringing that Glass blames for his journalistic fabrications, and yet have never engaged in fraudulent behavior.
OPINION
November 6, 2013
Re "Should a liar be a lawyer?," Editorial, Nov. 3 Astonishment is not an adequate term to describe my reaction to your editorial advocating that serial fabricator Stephen Glass be allowed to practice law in California. Do we not already have enough lawyers in the state to support the public's needs? I say we have a surplus of attorneys, and this demonstrably crooked Glass can find other venues for himself, like finance, insurance, banking or even journalism. But please, keep him out of my courthouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SACRAMENTO -- The California Supreme Court appeared unwilling Wednesday to grant a law license to a former journalist who fabricated stories for national magazines but now says he is steadfastly honest. During a hearing in Sacramento,  several justices of the state high court indicated they were not convinced that Stephen Glass ,  41, who concocted articles for the New Republic and other magazines in the mid-1990s, had shown enough evidence of rehabilitation to be permitted to practice law. Justice Joyce L. Kennard spoke at length of articles that Glass had fabricated and the importance of honesty in the law.  Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye observed that Glass was involved in a “a depth of deception that was pretty sophisticated.” Justice Marvin Baxter noted that Glass' prior conduct was not an isolated incident, but a pattern “over a long period of time.” Justice Ming W. Chin said Glass had benefited from his misconduct by earning money from a novel he wrote about his experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A former journalist who fabricated magazine articles is unlikely ever to get a license to practice law, legal experts say. Stephen R. Glass lost a years-long bid to become a lawyer Monday after the California Supreme Court denied him a law license in a unanimous ruling. The court faulted his character and a failure to atone for prior misconduct, saying he not only deceived readers and editors but also failed later to be completely candid about his transgressions.  Glass' deceit was "motivated by professional ambition, betrayed a vicious, mean spirit and a complete lack of compassion for others, along with arrogance and prejudice against various ethnic groups," the court said in an unsigned ruling.
OPINION
July 6, 2012
Has Stephen Glass, the serial fabricator who disgraced the New Republic magazine and inspired an entertaining indie film, reformed sufficiently to be allowed to practice law? We don't profess to know the answer to that question, but if the state Supreme Court determines that he has mended his ways, it should allow him to hang up his shingle. As anyone who has seen the movie "Shattered Glass" knows, Glass was a wunderkind in Washington journalism who in the 1990s produced stories that were too good to be true - literally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Paul Zuckerman was sifting through resumes when he paused, "astounded," over a particularly strong applicant for a law clerk opening: Ivy League undergraduate, top-notch law school, legal work for two judges in Washington. Zuckerman's Los Angeles County firm handled personal injury cases - auto accidents and slip-and-falls. He figured the applicant, whose credentials marked him for a prestigious "white shoe" firm, had applied to the wrong place. Then he read the cover letter. Stephen Randall Glass wrote that he was a disgraced former Washington journalist.
OPINION
February 1, 2014
Re "Glass - new media scapegoat," Opinion, Jan. 30 Meghan Daum misses an important point in the California Supreme Court's refusal to give disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass membership in the California State Bar. She says that his punishment seems particularly severe. On the contrary, his only "punishment" was to be denied the privilege of working as an attorney in California. The court did not intend to comment on his suitability for any other kind of employment. Glass' powers of persuasion got him a job as a paralegal, consent by the State Bar Court to his admission as an attorney and many glowing testimonials.
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | Meghan Daum
More than 15 years after fabricating some 42 articles for the New Republic, Rolling Stone and other magazines, Stephen Glass was back in the news this week. On Monday, the California Supreme Court ruled that Glass, 41, does not have the moral character "critical to the practice of law. " He has been trying for a decade to overcome that hurdle. He's certainly qualified otherwise. Glass graduated from Georgetown Law School in 2000, passed bar exams in New York and California, and has worked for years as a paralegal at a Beverly Hills firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Gotta admit, I was rooting for Stephen Glass in his quest to be admitted to the California bar. I had trouble grasping how a disgraced "wunderkind" journalist who made up or falsely embellished some 40 magazine stories in the late-1990s could not be considered rehabilitated after abjectly apologizing, undergoing 12 years of psychotherapy, attending law school, working as a law clerk, providing free legal aid to homeless clients and generally reinventing...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A former journalist who fabricated magazine articles is unlikely ever to get a license to practice law, legal experts say. Stephen R. Glass lost a years-long bid to become a lawyer Monday after the California Supreme Court denied him a law license in a unanimous ruling. The court faulted his character and a failure to atone for prior misconduct, saying he not only deceived readers and editors but also failed later to be completely candid about his transgressions.  Glass' deceit was "motivated by professional ambition, betrayed a vicious, mean spirit and a complete lack of compassion for others, along with arrogance and prejudice against various ethnic groups," the court said in an unsigned ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO--Stephen R. Glass, a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, will learn Monday whether the California Supreme Court believes he possesses the necessary moral character to practice law. The state high court is expected to issue its long-awaited ruling on whether Glass, dubbed a “serial liar” by state bar officials, has demonstrated sufficient rehabilitation to deserve a law license. During a hearing in November, the justices appeared overwhelmingly opposed to admitting Glass to the California bar. Glass, 41, was in his 20s when he fabricated 42 articles for the New Republic, Rolling Stone and other magazines before being caught in 1998.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
It's bad enough that it's Monday, but after what happened at the Vatican on Sunday, I'm feeling especially blue on this Monday. You've probably seen the pictures and/or the video: Pope Francis punctuated his plea for peace in the restive Ukraine by having two youngsters release a pair of snow-white doves from a window overlooking St. Peter's Square. Unfortunately, what came next was straight out of “Mars Attacks!” PHOTOS: Pope Francis' small steps to lift liberals' hearts First, a crow attacked one of the doves.
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | Meghan Daum
More than 15 years after fabricating some 42 articles for the New Republic, Rolling Stone and other magazines, Stephen Glass was back in the news this week. On Monday, the California Supreme Court ruled that Glass, 41, does not have the moral character "critical to the practice of law. " He has been trying for a decade to overcome that hurdle. He's certainly qualified otherwise. Glass graduated from Georgetown Law School in 2000, passed bar exams in New York and California, and has worked for years as a paralegal at a Beverly Hills firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO--Stephen R. Glass, a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, will learn Monday whether the California Supreme Court believes he possesses the necessary moral character to practice law. The state high court is expected to issue its long-awaited ruling on whether Glass, dubbed a “serial liar” by state bar officials, has demonstrated sufficient rehabilitation to deserve a law license. During a hearing in November, the justices appeared overwhelmingly opposed to admitting Glass to the California bar. Glass, 41, was in his 20s when he fabricated 42 articles for the New Republic, Rolling Stone and other magazines before being caught in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Stephen R. Glass , a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, may not practice law in California because he has failed to show sufficient rehabilitation, the state's high court decided Monday. In a unanimous, unsigned ruling, the California Supreme Court said Glass had demonstrated a pattern for deceit for which he has not adequately atoned. Glass has failed to "establish that he engaged in truly exemplary conduct over an extended period," the court said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A former journalist who fabricated magazine articles lost a years-long bid to become a lawyer Monday in a court ruling that faulted his character and a failure to atone for his prior misconduct. In a unanimous decision, the California Supreme Court said Stephen R. Glass must be denied a law license not only because he deceived readers and editors as a journalist but because he failed to be completely candid in later years about his transgressions. Glass' deceit was "motivated by professional ambition, betrayed a vicious, mean spirit and a complete lack of compassion for others, along with arrogance and prejudice against various ethnic groups," the court said in an unsigned ruling.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|