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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
The Swerve How the World Became Modern Stephen Greenblatt W.W. Norton: 356 pp., $26.95 On the Nature of Things Lucretius, translated by Frank O. Copley W.W. Norton: 177 pp., $15.95 paper Can a single book really change the world? There are plenty of candidates, including Lucretius' "On the Nature of Things," and W.W. Norton has reissued Frank O. Copley's translation of this wondrous poem to coincide with Stephen Greenblatt's "The Swerve: How the World Became Modern," an equally wondrous book about how this classic was nearly lost and why Western civilization would be much poorer if that had happened.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
If you're looking for a way to commemorate William Shakespeare's birthday -  he was born 450 years ago today, on April 23, 1564 - the most interesting party may take place at UCLA's William Andrews Clark Memorial Library in West Adams. From 4-7 Wednesday evening, the library will celebrate not Shakespeare's writing so much as his reading , with an event called “Shakespeare's Bookshelf.” This is compelling for a variety of reasons, not least that Shakespeare was a voracious reader, said (in much the same way as John Milton)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
You've seen the movie. Now read the book. First, the movie: "Shakespeare in Love" was still an idea buzzing around screenwriter Marc Norman's head when he sought out a preeminent Elizabethan literary scholar to help him flesh out the man behind the plays. Norman called universities around the country for names of "the major dudes in Shakespeare studies, and everyone kept mentioning Stephen Greenblatt," Norman says.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
The 2012 Pulitzer Prize for fiction went to no one, it was announced Monday. The Pulitzer judges did reveal that three books had been named finalists, but declined to award one the prize. The three finalists  were "Train Dreams" by Denis Johnson, "Swamplandia!" by Karen Russell and "The Pale King" by David Foster Wallace. In deciding the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, a committee of readers, which changes annually, recommends a small slate of titles to a panel of judges, who choose the winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Born more than 2,000 years ago, the Roman poet Lucretius really belongs to our day. How's that? Well, when you look closely at his great work, "On the Nature of Things" (W.W. Norton: 177 pp., $15.95 paper), you find him writing about a world that sounds much like our own. There he speaks of tiny, indivisible bits called atoms ("all/are sundered into particles of matter") and something that even sounds like a description of DNA ("each thing has but one substance/marked and designed to bring it into being")
NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
The 2012 Pulitzer Prize for fiction went to no one, it was announced Monday. The Pulitzer judges did reveal that three books had been named finalists, but declined to award one the prize. The three finalists  were "Train Dreams" by Denis Johnson, "Swamplandia!" by Karen Russell and "The Pale King" by David Foster Wallace. In deciding the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, a committee of readers, which changes annually, recommends a small slate of titles to a panel of judges, who choose the winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
If you're looking for a way to commemorate William Shakespeare's birthday -  he was born 450 years ago today, on April 23, 1564 - the most interesting party may take place at UCLA's William Andrews Clark Memorial Library in West Adams. From 4-7 Wednesday evening, the library will celebrate not Shakespeare's writing so much as his reading , with an event called “Shakespeare's Bookshelf.” This is compelling for a variety of reasons, not least that Shakespeare was a voracious reader, said (in much the same way as John Milton)
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Tribune Newspapers
A deceased biographer and a first-time bestselling novelist are among the finalists for the 2011 National Book Awards. Five finalists in four categories – fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people's literature – were announced Wednesday in Oregon. After the announcement, a sixth book was added to the list of finalists in young people's literature. "We made a mistake, there was a miscommunication," said Harold Augebraum, executive director of the National Book Foundation. "We could have taken one of the books away to keep it five, but we decided that it was better to add a sixth one as an exception, because they're all good books.
BOOKS
September 26, 2004 | Marina Warner, Marina Warner is the author of, most recently, "Fantastic Metamorphoses, Other Worlds: Ways of Telling the Self" and "Signs & Wonders: Essays on Literature and Culture."
Since around 1650, when Sir William Dugdale began rummaging in Warwickshire for Shakespeareana, antiquarians and scholars have been sifting every dusty ledger or packet of bills for traces of the Stratford lad who left for London sometime in the 1580s and became Shakespeare. In "Will in the World," Stephen Greenblatt has combed these findings to track the strangely light, even effaced footsteps of Shakespeare on history.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Yesterday, I reported here on a number of literary voices lamenting the store closures announced by the bookstore chain Barnes & Noble. But perhaps this is a case of: “The bookstore is dead! Long live the bookstore!” The idea of selling books from your own shop is a romantic one, and it's gripped the otherwise sane mind of many a book lover. Over in Riverside, one such avid reader recently celebrated her new bookstore's third month in business. Linda Sherman-Nurick opened the 1,745-square-foot store Cellar Door Books under a vine-filled trellis in Riverside's Canyon Crest Town Center on Oct. 26. It's “Riverside's Independent Bookstore,” as her advertising proudly announces.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
The Swerve How the World Became Modern Stephen Greenblatt W.W. Norton: 356 pp., $26.95 On the Nature of Things Lucretius, translated by Frank O. Copley W.W. Norton: 177 pp., $15.95 paper Can a single book really change the world? There are plenty of candidates, including Lucretius' "On the Nature of Things," and W.W. Norton has reissued Frank O. Copley's translation of this wondrous poem to coincide with Stephen Greenblatt's "The Swerve: How the World Became Modern," an equally wondrous book about how this classic was nearly lost and why Western civilization would be much poorer if that had happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Born more than 2,000 years ago, the Roman poet Lucretius really belongs to our day. How's that? Well, when you look closely at his great work, "On the Nature of Things" (W.W. Norton: 177 pp., $15.95 paper), you find him writing about a world that sounds much like our own. There he speaks of tiny, indivisible bits called atoms ("all/are sundered into particles of matter") and something that even sounds like a description of DNA ("each thing has but one substance/marked and designed to bring it into being")
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Tribune Newspapers
A deceased biographer and a first-time bestselling novelist are among the finalists for the 2011 National Book Awards. Five finalists in four categories – fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people's literature – were announced Wednesday in Oregon. After the announcement, a sixth book was added to the list of finalists in young people's literature. "We made a mistake, there was a miscommunication," said Harold Augebraum, executive director of the National Book Foundation. "We could have taken one of the books away to keep it five, but we decided that it was better to add a sixth one as an exception, because they're all good books.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
You've seen the movie. Now read the book. First, the movie: "Shakespeare in Love" was still an idea buzzing around screenwriter Marc Norman's head when he sought out a preeminent Elizabethan literary scholar to help him flesh out the man behind the plays. Norman called universities around the country for names of "the major dudes in Shakespeare studies, and everyone kept mentioning Stephen Greenblatt," Norman says.
BOOKS
September 26, 2004 | Marina Warner, Marina Warner is the author of, most recently, "Fantastic Metamorphoses, Other Worlds: Ways of Telling the Self" and "Signs & Wonders: Essays on Literature and Culture."
Since around 1650, when Sir William Dugdale began rummaging in Warwickshire for Shakespeareana, antiquarians and scholars have been sifting every dusty ledger or packet of bills for traces of the Stratford lad who left for London sometime in the 1580s and became Shakespeare. In "Will in the World," Stephen Greenblatt has combed these findings to track the strangely light, even effaced footsteps of Shakespeare on history.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bob Dylan, the unofficial poet laureate of the rock 'n' roll generation, has now been officially placed alongside such literary greats as Philip Roth and Adrienne Rich, not to mention biographers of Shakespeare and Willem de Kooning. All were among nominees announced Saturday for the National Book Critics Circle prizes. Dylan, whose memoir "Chronicles, Volume One" was a favorite with reviewers and readers, is among the finalists in the biography/autobiography category.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bob Dylan, whose memoir "Chronicles, Vol. I" is nominated for a National Book Critics Circle prize, will probably be too busy with his day job to attend the March 18 ceremony. "Bob Dylan is honored by the NBCC nomination; however, he'll be on a concert tour in March," Simon & Schuster spokeswoman Victoria Meyer said Tuesday. Meyer added that the publisher would "work with his office to see if there's any way he can come to the NBCC ceremony."
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