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Stephen Harper

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WORLD
January 24, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Conservative Party leader Stephen Harper is not a charismatic politician. Instead, he tends to be aloof and cerebral, with an explosive temper and a reluctance for the baby kissing and back-slapping that are part of a typical campaign. But the former oil executive and economist has a sharp mind for policy and an instinct for strategy that helped win the wary support of Canadians in a carefully controlled campaign.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 2, 2012 | By Kathleen B. Hennessey and Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama hosted the leaders of Mexico and Canada on Monday in a White House summit aimed at boosting the region's growing economic ties, but the scourge of drug violence in Mexico muddled the message and highlighted friction between the neighbors. Obama met with Mexican President Felipe Calderon and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and the three announced an initiative to cut regulations that constrict trade across the northern and southern borders. But Mexico's drug war, which has killed tens of thousands of people, dominated a Rose Garden news conference.
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WORLD
January 27, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
New Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper warned the United States to back off from a challenge of Canadian sovereignty in Arctic waters that are thawing from global warming. In the first news conference since his election, Harper upbraided U.S. Ambassador David H. Wilkins for asserting that the icy polar regions are international waters. Canada claims that its estimated 16,000 islands in the region make it Canadian.
WORLD
May 3, 2011 | By Bruce Wallace, Los Angeles Times
The words "dramatic" and "Canadian election" seldom go together. Even Canadians are mostly bored by their politics, other than spikes of interest when Quebeckers vote on whether to separate from the rest of Canada (the last time: 16 years ago. Answer: a close "no") or the occasional election fought over more than just the spoils of power (probably not since 1988, when they voted, essentially, on whether to sign a free-trade agreement with the United States. Answer: a grudging "yes")
OPINION
January 29, 2006
Re "Canada Shifts to Right in Election," Jan. 24 You state that Stephen Harper was elected Canadian prime minister despite concerns that some of his social views are extreme. In fact, he was elected because the opposition has been pushing extreme left positions for years, and that finally resulted in Canadians being fed up. Anything short of full acceptance of the traditional definition of marriage being changed to include gays and other options is considered extreme. Any view that doesn't embrace abortion as morally just is considered extreme.
WORLD
January 24, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Canadians elected a new, conservative government Monday that is expected to edge Canada to the right politically and build closer ties to the Bush administration, marking the end of the Liberal Party's 13-year reign.
WORLD
December 5, 2008 | Geraldine Baum, Baum is a Times staff writer.
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper on Thursday secured permission for a rare suspension of Parliament, a move that allows him to avoid an imminent vote that would have toppled his Conservative government, elected just two months ago. But the narrow escape from a crisis that was largely self- inflicted has badly scarred a prime minister already widely regarded as a bully, and reawakened a national unity crisis in a country where regional grievances are sometimes dormant but easily stirred.
WORLD
May 26, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has declared he won't talk to the national media because they are biased against him, his latest move in a spat with the Parliament's press corps. After reporters walked out of a news conference this week when he refused to answer any questions, Harper said no Liberal prime minister had faced such effrontery, and he had decided to deal only with more friendly local press.
WORLD
March 31, 2010 | By Paul Richter
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper on Tuesday rebuffed an American suggestion that he keep some of his country's troops in Afghanistan after a scheduled pullout next year, reasserting that only civilians would continue in the mission. Harper reiterated his stand during a 20-minute meeting in Ottawa with visiting Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Harper made it clear that "Canada will remain engaged, but this is going to be a civilian-based mission," said Dimitri Soudas, his press secretary.
WORLD
April 2, 2012 | By Kathleen B. Hennessey and Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama hosted the leaders of Mexico and Canada on Monday in a White House summit aimed at boosting the region's growing economic ties, but the scourge of drug violence in Mexico muddled the message and highlighted friction between the neighbors. Obama met with Mexican President Felipe Calderon and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and the three announced an initiative to cut regulations that constrict trade across the northern and southern borders. But Mexico's drug war, which has killed tens of thousands of people, dominated a Rose Garden news conference.
WORLD
March 31, 2010 | By Paul Richter
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper on Tuesday rebuffed an American suggestion that he keep some of his country's troops in Afghanistan after a scheduled pullout next year, reasserting that only civilians would continue in the mission. Harper reiterated his stand during a 20-minute meeting in Ottawa with visiting Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Harper made it clear that "Canada will remain engaged, but this is going to be a civilian-based mission," said Dimitri Soudas, his press secretary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
John "Jack" Babcock was a 15 1/2 -year-old Canadian farm boy when he joined the 146th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1916 during World War I. "They were hard up for men then," he recalled in 2003 in the Ottawa Citizen. "They didn't have the draft yet" and relied on enlistees. Babcock, Canada's last known World War I veteran, died Thursday at 109 at his home in Spokane, Wash. "As a nation, we honour his service and mourn his passing," Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Thursday in a statement.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2009 | Andrew Malcolm and Kate Linthicum
A recent string of decisions made by officials at the Arlington Independent School District in Texas has ensured that there will be no politics in the classroom there. And, apparently, there will be no fun, either. It all began when district Supt. Jerry McCullough denied students a chance to watch President Obama's speech to the nation's schoolchildren about the importance of education. McCullough banned the address because, he said, it might interfere with lesson plans and cause a distraction.
WORLD
February 20, 2009 | Mike Dorning
President Obama made a seven-hour pit stop in this snow-draped Canadian capital Thursday, an inaugural foreign trip as president in which he sought to reaffirm good-neighborly relations and encountered crowds almost giddy at his presence.
WORLD
December 5, 2008 | Geraldine Baum, Baum is a Times staff writer.
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper on Thursday secured permission for a rare suspension of Parliament, a move that allows him to avoid an imminent vote that would have toppled his Conservative government, elected just two months ago. But the narrow escape from a crisis that was largely self- inflicted has badly scarred a prime minister already widely regarded as a bully, and reawakened a national unity crisis in a country where regional grievances are sometimes dormant but easily stirred.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2007 | Jim Rossi, Special to The Times
"WHAT I do," evangelist Joel Osteen told CNN's Larry King in 2005, "is just try to teach practical principles. I may not bring the Scripture in until the end of my sermon, and I don't feel bad about that." Osteen wrote the bestselling "Your Best Life Now" and leads Lakewood Church in Houston, a nondenominational congregation of as many as 30,000 worshipers in an arena than once housed the NBA's Houston Rockets. "I want to have a relationship with Jesus," he explained.
WORLD
May 3, 2011 | By Bruce Wallace, Los Angeles Times
The words "dramatic" and "Canadian election" seldom go together. Even Canadians are mostly bored by their politics, other than spikes of interest when Quebeckers vote on whether to separate from the rest of Canada (the last time: 16 years ago. Answer: a close "no") or the occasional election fought over more than just the spoils of power (probably not since 1988, when they voted, essentially, on whether to sign a free-trade agreement with the United States. Answer: a grudging "yes")
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch is a contributing writer to the Book Review and the author of "Moses: A Life."
"Angels can fly," wrote G. K. Chesterton, "because they take themselves lightly," and that's the credo of Stephen Mitchell's "Meetings With the Archangel," a beguiling spiritual memoir that masquerades as a comic novel. Mitchell is an accomplished and distinguished interpreter of sacred texts, and his translations and readings have earned him a following among the earnest seekers whose favorite books are found on the "Religion and Spirituality" shelf.
WORLD
May 26, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has declared he won't talk to the national media because they are biased against him, his latest move in a spat with the Parliament's press corps. After reporters walked out of a news conference this week when he refused to answer any questions, Harper said no Liberal prime minister had faced such effrontery, and he had decided to deal only with more friendly local press.
OPINION
January 29, 2006
Re "Canada Shifts to Right in Election," Jan. 24 You state that Stephen Harper was elected Canadian prime minister despite concerns that some of his social views are extreme. In fact, he was elected because the opposition has been pushing extreme left positions for years, and that finally resulted in Canadians being fed up. Anything short of full acceptance of the traditional definition of marriage being changed to include gays and other options is considered extreme. Any view that doesn't embrace abortion as morally just is considered extreme.
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