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Stephen Hartke

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | Josef Woodard
Stephen Hartke is one of those young composers deserving wider recognition. Raised in New York City and now teaching at USC, he boasts a hearty stylistic voice that nods in the direction of Stravinsky and other 20th century models as well as various folk idioms. But, as heard on this evocative recording of orchestral music, he pays no dues to specific compositional schools or isms, which could account for both his relative obscurity and his distinctive palette.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2003 | Louise Roug
Composer Stephen Hartke, a professor of composition at the USC Thornton School of Music, has been selected by the American Academy of Arts and Letters to receive the Charles Ives Living Award. The idea behind the prize, which awards an income of $75,000 per year for three years, is to give a promising American composer freedom to concentrate on composition; the recipient agrees to forgo salaried employment during those three years. The prize carries no restrictions on accepting commissions.
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NEWS
July 1, 1993 | ANNE LOUISE BANNON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Music grabbed composer Stephen Hartke when he was young. The Glendale resident, one of four recent recipients of an Academy Award in Music from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York, was 9 years old when he first sang in a church choir. At age 10, he wrote his first composition. The choir sang Masses, "so the first piece I wrote was a Mass," he recalled. "It was a little tiny Mass. I think it was about four pages." Since that time, Hartke, now 40, has earned his Ph.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2003 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
When local composer Stephen Hartke began his new symphony a year and a half ago, the first sound he imagined was four male voices, singing -- sotto voce -- the word "wondrous." Now, Hartke's Symphony No. 3 is about to receive its world premiere Thursday night by the New York Philharmonic, which commissioned it for the opening weekend of its 2003-04 season. Next week, another of his compositions will premiere at Merkin Concert Hall in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2003 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
When local composer Stephen Hartke began his new symphony a year and a half ago, the first sound he imagined was four male voices, singing -- sotto voce -- the word "wondrous." Now, Hartke's Symphony No. 3 is about to receive its world premiere Thursday night by the New York Philharmonic, which commissioned it for the opening weekend of its 2003-04 season. Next week, another of his compositions will premiere at Merkin Concert Hall in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2003 | Louise Roug
Composer Stephen Hartke, a professor of composition at the USC Thornton School of Music, has been selected by the American Academy of Arts and Letters to receive the Charles Ives Living Award. The idea behind the prize, which awards an income of $75,000 per year for three years, is to give a promising American composer freedom to concentrate on composition; the recipient agrees to forgo salaried employment during those three years. The prize carries no restrictions on accepting commissions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are probably few things composers prize for their work quite as much as performances and audiences. So if you take a conventional juried competition with a $45,000 prize and add in extensive broadcast and recorded performances, you may have the perfect lure for the postmodern composer. That is exactly what a new international competition, Masterprize, has done.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The age-old question in opera is which comes first--the music or the words? In the case of Frank Ticheli's "An American Dream," which receives its premiere today at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, the answer is simple: the words. Actually, the new piece is not an opera. It's subtitled "A Symphony of Songs for Soprano and Orchestra." Still, the principal applies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1999
Once again we are faced with the dilemma of the future of classical music. Brent L. Trafton complains about modern music ("Philharmonic Should Put Audience First," Counterpunch, July 5), and Stephen Hartke defends the composer ("Philharmonic Reflects Audience, Culture," Counterpunch, July 12) with the standard mantra that the audience needs to listen more to the composer. This is partially true: All of us composers wish to be heard by the public. But Hartke's argument is nearly 80 years old, starting with Schoenberg, and the public has yet to be swayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rome Prize Winner: Stephen Hartke, 38, composer-in-residence with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and a USC composition teacher, is one of 14 visual artists, musicians and architects announced today as winners of the American Academy in Rome competition. The Rome Prize, established in 1894 with Rockefeller and Morgan money, awards stipends that allow continuing artistic endeavors in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1999
Once again we are faced with the dilemma of the future of classical music. Brent L. Trafton complains about modern music ("Philharmonic Should Put Audience First," Counterpunch, July 5), and Stephen Hartke defends the composer ("Philharmonic Reflects Audience, Culture," Counterpunch, July 12) with the standard mantra that the audience needs to listen more to the composer. This is partially true: All of us composers wish to be heard by the public. But Hartke's argument is nearly 80 years old, starting with Schoenberg, and the public has yet to be swayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | Josef Woodard
Stephen Hartke is one of those young composers deserving wider recognition. Raised in New York City and now teaching at USC, he boasts a hearty stylistic voice that nods in the direction of Stravinsky and other 20th century models as well as various folk idioms. But, as heard on this evocative recording of orchestral music, he pays no dues to specific compositional schools or isms, which could account for both his relative obscurity and his distinctive palette.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The age-old question in opera is which comes first--the music or the words? In the case of Frank Ticheli's "An American Dream," which receives its premiere today at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, the answer is simple: the words. Actually, the new piece is not an opera. It's subtitled "A Symphony of Songs for Soprano and Orchestra." Still, the principal applies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are probably few things composers prize for their work quite as much as performances and audiences. So if you take a conventional juried competition with a $45,000 prize and add in extensive broadcast and recorded performances, you may have the perfect lure for the postmodern composer. That is exactly what a new international competition, Masterprize, has done.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | ANNE LOUISE BANNON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Music grabbed composer Stephen Hartke when he was young. The Glendale resident, one of four recent recipients of an Academy Award in Music from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York, was 9 years old when he first sang in a church choir. At age 10, he wrote his first composition. The choir sang Masses, "so the first piece I wrote was a Mass," he recalled. "It was a little tiny Mass. I think it was about four pages." Since that time, Hartke, now 40, has earned his Ph.D.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | Diane Haithman
Playwright John Guare and artist Chuck Close received Gold Medal Awards for drama and graphic design, respectively, from the American Academy of Arts and Letters at an awards ceremony in New York City Wednesday. The Gold Medal prizes, which rotate annually among various creative disciplines, carry no cash award.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001
For the 2001-02 season, its 98th, Coleman Concerts will present six chamber ensembles in Beckman Auditorium at Caltech in Pasadena, all on Sundays at 3:30 p.m. The Orion String Quartet opens the season Nov. 4 with a Beethoven program. The Tokyo String Quartet returns to Coleman Jan. 13, playing works of Schubert, Webern, Mozart and Brahms. Music from the 17th and 18th centuries makes up the King's Consort agenda Feb. 24.
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