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Stephen Hawking

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NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
The fanfare that accompanied Stephen Hawking's entrance into Caltech's Beckman Auditorium on Tuesday evening was at once cosmologically grand and a bit tongue-in-cheek. It was Richard Strauss' 1896 “Thus Spake Zarathustra," more familiar to modern audiences as the theme music for “2001: A Space Odyssey.” It brought the 500 people inside to their feet for the rock-star cosmologist with crossover va va voom from “The Simpsons” and “The Big Bang Theory.”   Hawking first visited Caltech in 1974, and he has been a visiting professor and speaker almost every year since 1991.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
"Hawking" boasts that it tells its subject's story "in my own words. " Indeed, Stephen Finnigan's documentary on the personal life and professional work of English theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking is narrated in his familiar computerized voice. Trapped inside a body ravaged by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), he operates his speech-generating device by twitching his cheek - a laborious process skipped over in this glossy, glowing portrait of the mind behind gravitational singularity theorems and Hawking radiation, which concedes that black holes emit particles.
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SCIENCE
September 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
For many science fans, watching Stephen Hawking give a speech - perched on a stage, nearly motionless in his wheelchair, holding forth in the computerized voice that has become his trademark - is a rare treat.  At Caltech, where the physicist comes for regular extended visits, people line up for hours for a chance to get a ticket. Those who can't get admission to the lecture hall watch on screens set up outdoors, craning their necks for a glimpse of their hero. LA Times: Stephen Hawking speaks to Cedars-Sinai staff in 2013 Now readers everywhere can share a piece of that experience, as Hawking's new memoir - which expands on his popular talks - goes on sale Tuesday.
SCIENCE
September 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
For many science fans, watching Stephen Hawking give a speech - perched on a stage, nearly motionless in his wheelchair, holding forth in the computerized voice that has become his trademark - is a rare treat.  At Caltech, where the physicist comes for regular extended visits, people line up for hours for a chance to get a ticket. Those who can't get admission to the lecture hall watch on screens set up outdoors, craning their necks for a glimpse of their hero. LA Times: Stephen Hawking speaks to Cedars-Sinai staff in 2013 Now readers everywhere can share a piece of that experience, as Hawking's new memoir - which expands on his popular talks - goes on sale Tuesday.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2012
Intel Corp. is trying to help physicist Stephen Hawking keep speaking. Intel chief technology officer Justin Rattner told the Associated Press that the tech giant has a research team in Britain that is trying to come up with a new speech system for Hawking, who is severely diasabled by Lou Gehrig's disease. The goal is to keep Hawking's speech from continuing to slow. It's a tedious process for Hawking to speak. A tiny infrared sensor translates movement in his right cheek into words spoken by a voice synthesizer.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Humans are on the cusp of discovering how the universe works on its biggest and smallest scales, Stephen Hawking said during a lecture Tuesday in Los Angeles. The renowned theoretical physicist made his name studying black holes, massive structures that anchor galaxies and whose gravity is so strong that not even light can escape. But on Tuesday, he delved into the world of microscopic cell biology to see first-hand how researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute are using stem cells to develop treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, the disease Hawking was diagnosed with in 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Sara Lippincott, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stephen Hawking An Unfettered Mind Kitty Ferguson Palgrave Macmillan: 320 pp., $27 Today is Stephen Hawking's 70th birthday. It's an event worth marking, not least for its profound unlikelihood. As many even outside the physics community know, he learned about 50 years ago that he had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease). He was given two years to live. However, at the time he was just coming into his own as a theoretical physicist, and he couldn't be bothered to die. Kitty Ferguson, a graduate of Juilliard and author of this intelligent and readable biography, "Stephen Hawking: An Unfettered Mind," is astonishing in her own right.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Want to discover the next big breakthrough in cosmology? Turn to the dark side, says renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking. “The missing link in cosmology is the nature of dark matter and dark energy,” Hawking said Tuesday night at Caltech, where he lectured on the origin of the universe. Results from the European Space Agency's Planck space telescope shows “that normal matter is only 5% of the energy density of the known universe; 27% is dark matter, 68% is dark energy,” he said.
SCIENCE
January 19, 2011 | By Eryn Brown and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
If some L.A.-area teachers wondered where their students were Tuesday, maybe they can blame Stephen Hawking. With his computerized voice, motorized wheelchair and an intellect that seems to leave mortal men far behind, Hawking is one of the best-known physicists ever. Die-hard fans, many of them youthful, started lining up early in the morning to get coveted free tickets to hear him speak at Caltech Tuesday night, school be damned. FOR THE RECORD: Stephen Hawking: A Jan. 19 article in LATExtra on a talk at Caltech given by physicist Stephen Hawking said he has a form of muscular dystrophy that is related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Stephen's appeal has to do with the fact that he's otherworldly, but at the same time He's an everyman," says director Errol Morris of Stephen Hawking, the severely disabled theoretical physicist who is the subject of Morris' documentary film "A Brief History of Time," which opens Friday. "When you look at things with the scale of the cosmos in mind, his situation isn't much different from everyone else's.
OPINION
April 30, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
In the new sci-fi movie "Oblivion," Earth's most precious resource is Tom Cruise. But running a close second (spoiler alert) is water. Aliens want it. All of it. This is old hat, science fiction-wise. In "The War of the Worlds," H.G. Wells had Martians coming to Earth to quench their thirst. The extraterrestrial lizards (cleverly disguised as human catalog models) in the 1980s TV series "V" came here to steal our water too - though they wanted it in part to wash down the meal they intended to make of us. In the more recent "Battle: Los Angeles," pillaging Earth's oceans was the only motivation we're given for why aliens were laying waste to humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Although Pier Paolo Pasolini was best known as an Italian filmmaker, he called himself a poet and his Wikipedia entry begins by also describing him as a journalist, philosopher, linguist, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, columnist, actor, painter, political figure and all-around visionary thinker. The Monday Evening Concerts biography of Rolf Riehm describes the 75-year-old German composer as "a political being" whose work encompasses "philosophical reflection, historical fact, myth, fairy tale, recollection, scientific argument, the elevated and the trivial, current social and political findings" and whatnot.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Want to discover the next big breakthrough in cosmology? Turn to the dark side, says renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking. “The missing link in cosmology is the nature of dark matter and dark energy,” Hawking said Tuesday night at Caltech, where he lectured on the origin of the universe. Results from the European Space Agency's Planck space telescope shows “that normal matter is only 5% of the energy density of the known universe; 27% is dark matter, 68% is dark energy,” he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2013 | By Tiffany Kelly
A few Caltech students had the chance to pick famed physicist Stephen Hawking's brain on black holes and other topics after he gave a lecture on campus Tuesday. The questions were submitted in advance; Hawking answered through a speech-generating device. He was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 1963 and has spent much of his life in a wheelchair. One Caltech student asked Hawking after the lecture if he believed in a theory that our universe was caused by a black hole in another universe.
SCIENCE
April 13, 2013 | Eryn Brown and Joseph Serna
Clive Svendsen doesn't get rattled easily, but the neurobiologist couldn't help sweating when Stephen Hawking paid a visit to his lab this week. Hawking is one of the world's foremost theoretical physicists. He pioneered groundbreaking research into how particles behave around black holes and deduced that black holes spit out radiation as they swallow up matter. He's also credited with teaching millions about the mysteries of the cosmos through his books, including the bestseller "A Brief History of Time.
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