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Stephen Hawking

SCIENCE
July 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
Stephen Hawking formally presented a paper Wednesday that said he was wrong about black holes for almost 30 years. The renowned Cambridge University physicist's paper argued that black holes, the celestial vortexes formed from collapsed stars, preserve traces of objects swallowed up and eventually could spit bits out "in a mangled form."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
"Hawking" boasts that it tells its subject's story "in my own words. " Indeed, Stephen Finnigan's documentary on the personal life and professional work of English theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking is narrated in his familiar computerized voice. Trapped inside a body ravaged by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), he operates his speech-generating device by twitching his cheek - a laborious process skipped over in this glossy, glowing portrait of the mind behind gravitational singularity theorems and Hawking radiation, which concedes that black holes emit particles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1997 | JOEL GREENBERG, TIMES SCIENCE EDITOR
In the 1950's science-fiction classic, "Invaders From Mars," lumbering, 7-foot guys in bad green jumpsuits are ordered about, silently, by an immobile telepathic being. It is obvious that, in contrast to his flock of giants and Earthlings alike, this pure, intellectual entity is the ultimate mental superior--his penetrating eyes at once conveying intelligence and patience for the rest of us.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's the voice you notice first, measured and mechanical and asking the most unnerving questions, as if Robby the Robot had ended up with Albert Einstein's brain. "Where did the universe come from and where is it going?" the voice asks, calm but insistent. "Did the universe have a beginning and what happened before then? Where does the difference between the past and the future come from? Will time ever come to an end?" The body behind the voice is no less arresting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1997 | DAVID COLKER
A motorized wheelchair with a single headlight and two red taillights methodically swerved through the sidewalk traffic on Pasadena's nouveau-trendy Colorado Boulevard. Apparently reluctant to stare at a severely disabled person, pedestrians discreetly looked away. If they had looked closer, they would have seen that the person in the chair was the most celebrated scientist of his generation, the true "master of the universe." It was Stephen Hawking. And he was late for the movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Software creator Walter Woltosz got a mysterious phone call from Cambridge University in 1985, shortly after he started selling a computer system he had designed to allow severely disabled people to write and even "speak" by manipulating a single button. News of the system had reached the caller, who wondered if it might be right for "a very bright fellow" at the English university who had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
OPINION
April 30, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
In the new sci-fi movie "Oblivion," Earth's most precious resource is Tom Cruise. But running a close second (spoiler alert) is water. Aliens want it. All of it. This is old hat, science fiction-wise. In "The War of the Worlds," H.G. Wells had Martians coming to Earth to quench their thirst. The extraterrestrial lizards (cleverly disguised as human catalog models) in the 1980s TV series "V" came here to steal our water too - though they wanted it in part to wash down the meal they intended to make of us. In the more recent "Battle: Los Angeles," pillaging Earth's oceans was the only motivation we're given for why aliens were laying waste to humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Although Pier Paolo Pasolini was best known as an Italian filmmaker, he called himself a poet and his Wikipedia entry begins by also describing him as a journalist, philosopher, linguist, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, columnist, actor, painter, political figure and all-around visionary thinker. The Monday Evening Concerts biography of Rolf Riehm describes the 75-year-old German composer as "a political being" whose work encompasses "philosophical reflection, historical fact, myth, fairy tale, recollection, scientific argument, the elevated and the trivial, current social and political findings" and whatnot.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A combination elf, oracle and rock star, Cambridge University physicist Stephen Hawking makes waves in physics that other people ride. So scientists listened when Hawking proposed in a technical talk Thursday at Caltech that the universe sprang from nothing into something in the shape of a wrinkly pea, and that the universe can be both open and closed, depending on how you look at it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
Silent and apparently inert, Stephen W. Hawking sits in the wheelchair to which he is confined, as members of a film crew buzz around him on a sound stage, shooting him from almost every conceivable angle. However you look at it, Hawking is not your average leading man. Yet here he sits, up on a pedestal in front of a blue screen, as the cameras bestow upon him all the attention usually reserved for a Redford, Eastwood or Costner.
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