Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen Heller
IN THE NEWS

Stephen Heller

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2006 | Hemmy So, Times Staff Writer
A whistle-blower to some, a thief to others, Stephen Heller says he's a regular guy, not an activist or a member of any political group. But charged last month in Los Angeles with three felonies for allegedly stealing damaging documents about voting machine manufacturer Diebold Election Systems, Heller has become a hero to digital rights and political activists who say he helped expose a threat to the election system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2006 | Hemmy So, Times Staff Writer
A whistle-blower to some, a thief to others, Stephen Heller says he's a regular guy, not an activist or a member of any political group. But charged last month in Los Angeles with three felonies for allegedly stealing damaging documents about voting machine manufacturer Diebold Election Systems, Heller has become a hero to digital rights and political activists who say he helped expose a threat to the election system.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2006 | Hemmy So, Times Staff Writer
A word processor accused of stealing damaging documents about electronic voting machine manufacturer Diebold Election Systems was arraigned Tuesday on three felony counts. Stephen Heller was charged in Los Angeles Superior Court with felony access to computer data, commercial burglary and receiving stolen property. He pleaded not guilty. "It's a devastating allegation for a whistle-blower," said Blair Berk, Heller's attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A temporary worker who took data about an electronic voting company from a law firm's computers avoided jail time in a plea agreement with prosecutors. Stephen Mark Heller, 44, pleaded guilty Nov. 20 to unlawfully accessing a computer at the Jones Day law firm in Los Angeles. The firm represented voting machine manufacturer Diebold Inc. Heller took memos stating that Diebold might have broken laws. The memos were subsequently leaked to the media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1985
A former gymnastics instructor who suffered injuries that left him a quadriplegic while working out on athletic equipment in 1980 was awarded $14.7 million in damages Tuesday by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury. The verdict, ending a six-month trial, was against AMF (American Machine and Foundry) Inc., maker of a mini-trampoline and gymnastics mat on which Randy Haims was warming up prior to teaching a class in Woodland Hills when the injury occurred.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Colleague Albert Goldberg once noted that judging an evening of new music can be a process of "separating the chaff from the chaff." It can be the same with new plays, especially experimental ones. Certainly there was some chaff on Series "A" of this year's Padua Hills Playwrights' Festival at Cal State Northridge. Series "B," though, is almost all wheat. The only piece that doesn't make a strong impression is John Steppling's "The Theory of Miracles."
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
Aerospace pioneer J. Leland Atwood, who we're told is responsible for the design of more flying machines than anyone (among his creations are the P-51 Mustang, the B-25 Mitchell bomber and the F-86 Sabrejet) will receive special kudos from the Los Angeles chapter of the ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists) Foundation. It will happen Nov. 4 when the local ARCS celebrate another successful year of doing and fund raising with a luncheon in the Music Center's Grand Hall.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | PAUL CIOTTI, Times Staff Writer
When the federal government's newest education brochure starts arriving in mailboxes later this month, it will look pretty much like thousands of other government pamphlets put out each year on topics ranging from aphids in the rose garden to safety tips for working in the barnyard. But this brochure is different.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|