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Stephen Hilbert

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BUSINESS
May 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Forbes Releases Executive Pay Survey: The average pay for chief executives of America's largest publicly held companies in 1994 was $993,000, up 11% over 1993, according to a survey in the May 22 issue of Forbes Magazine. The survey of CEOs of the companies, called the Forbes 800, shows 65% earning at least $1 million a year, up from 63% in 1993, 61% in 1992 and 51% in 1991. Total compensation includes salary and bonus, non-cash stock gains and other benefits.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Forbes Releases Executive Pay Survey: The average pay for chief executives of America's largest publicly held companies in 1994 was $993,000, up 11% over 1993, according to a survey in the May 22 issue of Forbes Magazine. The survey of CEOs of the companies, called the Forbes 800, shows 65% earning at least $1 million a year, up from 63% in 1993, 61% in 1992 and 51% in 1991. Total compensation includes salary and bonus, non-cash stock gains and other benefits.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Stephen C. Hilbert gave in to investor pressure and stepped down as Conseco Inc.'s chairman and chief executive. The struggling insurer reported a 64% drop in earnings. Chief Financial Officer Rollin Dick also resigned. Hilbert, who founded Conseco in 1979, and Dick are defendants in more than a dozen shareholder lawsuits against the company, whose stock has fallen about 90% since it acquired mobile-home lender Green Tree Financial Corp. two years ago.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
Insurance company Conseco Inc. said Monday that it will concentrate on the retiree market by acquiring all or parts of four life and health insurance companies for about $1.76 billion in cash, stock and debt. With the acquisitions, about 80% of the business of Carmel, Ind.-based Conseco will be aimed at the retiree market, Chairman Stephen Hilbert said.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Six of the nation's top 10 highest paid chief executives head computer software or hardware firms, according to a ranking released Sunday by Forbes magazine. The magazine ranked executives of the nation's top 800 companies by their total compensation packages for 1999, including salary, bonuses and stock gains. No. 1 on the list was Charles Wang, head of Computer Associates International Inc. of Islandia, N.Y., with a 1999 compensation package totaling $650.1 million, Forbes said.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stocks closed broadly higher Friday as tech investors shrugged off another rise in intermediate-term Treasury bond yields in the wake of the government's latest report on wage and benefit costs. The Nasdaq composite jumped 86.63 points, or 2.3%, to 3,860.66--the highest since April 11. Market breadth was strong, although trading volume remained modest. Winners topped losers by about 3 to 2 on the New York Stock Exchange and by 26 to 15 on Nasdaq, but the Dow dropped 154.19 points, or 1.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1999 | Bloomberg News
U.S. executives boosted their stock sales by 26% to a record $36.2 billion in 1998, led for a third consecutive year by Microsoft Corp. officers, but also raised their purchases. Microsoft director Paul Allen, who co-founded the world's largest personal computer software maker, led all officers with $3.6 billion in sales. Chairman and Chief Executive Bill Gates sold $1.8 billion in stock as Microsoft's shares more than doubled, according to research firm Washington Service.
OPINION
August 22, 2002 | ARIANNA HUFFINGTON, Arianna Huffington writes a syndicated column.
I'm tracking a new phenomenon called "scandal fatigue.'' It sets in when the corporate crime rate gets too high and the numbers being bandied about become too boggling to get your mind around. For instance, I was plenty angry when WorldCom announced that it had misstated its earnings by $3.7 billion. Then it looked through the books again and realized the amount was actually $7 billion. Was I supposed to be twice as ticked off? Or were there just too many zeros to grasp?
SPORTS
April 11, 1998 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The final three major preps for the Kentucky Derby are being run today but the picture for America's most famous race isn't likely to change. Favorite Trick, the reigning horse of the year, is expected to improve to 10-0 in the $500,000 Arkansas Derby, and Lil's Lad should dominate his four opponents in the $700,000 Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland. As for the $500,000 Wood Memorial at Aqueduct, well, does it really matter what happens?
BUSINESS
January 1, 2000 | STEVE MATTHEWS, BLOOMBERG NEWS
U.S. executives boosted their stock sales by 12% to $42.3 billion in 1999, led for the fourth year in a row by Microsoft Corp. officers, according to the Washington Service research firm. The amount of selling, particularly among technology officers, was restrained in 1999 given the 86% surge in the Nasdaq composite index and the 25% rise in the Dow Jones industrial average, analysts said. In fact, the increase in the total value of sales was the smallest since 1994.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-known Indiana-based insurance company on Thursday bid $3.25 billion for Kemper Corp., forcing General Electric Co. to withdraw its rival offer for the insurance and mutual funds company. The surprising $67-a-share takeover offer by Conseco Inc., a fast-growing life and health insurance company that has grown primarily through acquisitions, could stimulate consolidation in the insurance industry as other insurers feel pressure to cut costs and get bigger.
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