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Stephen Hough

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Pianist Stephen Hough has become a resource for CD aficionados because of the reams of out-of-the-way repertoire he has been setting down for the hardy Hyperion label. If you're curious about the piano concertos of Xaver Scharwenka, Emil von Sauer or Lowell Liebermann, Hough has some records for you. If you've always wanted to explore the solo piano music of Federico Mompou or York Bowen, Hough can oblige.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Pianist Stephen Hough has become a resource for CD aficionados because of the reams of out-of-the-way repertoire he has been setting down for the hardy Hyperion label. If you're curious about the piano concertos of Xaver Scharwenka, Emil von Sauer or Lowell Liebermann, Hough has some records for you. If you've always wanted to explore the solo piano music of Federico Mompou or York Bowen, Hough can oblige.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1988
That self-confessedly "most noble, most misunderstood humanitarian, critic, lutanist, poet," etc., Sixtus Beckmesser, has made his annual complaint about "celebrations of mediocrity" at the Hollywood Bowl ("The Beckmesser Awards of 1987," by Martin Bernheimer, Dec. 27). Obviously, his definition of mediocrity encompasses the following artists, who were among whose who graced the Bowl stage last summer: Emanuel Ax, Alfred Brendel, Leonard Bernstein, Yefim Bronfman, Alicia de Larrocha, Edo de Waart, Charles Dutoit, Richard Goode, Lynn Harrell, Stephen Hough, Christa Ludwig, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Itzhak Perlman, Andre Previn, Florence Quivar, Peter Roesel, Leonard Slatkin, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and Krystian Zimerman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA
To the casual observer, Stephen Hough may seem like a young pianist who has it all: technique and facility, an intriguing repertory, an intelligent and probing musical mind. And he does--as far as it goes. At the British pianist's latest Southern California recital, Friday night at UCLA, he put together a joy of a program, then failed to get the most out of it. Hough's lacks are easy to list, difficult to remedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Stridency and murkiness are two familiar, too-familiar qualities of sound we are hearing at Hollywood Bowl this summer--often in the same performances. Inconsistencies of amplification may sometimes account for the perceived, alternating brightness and turgidity of tone heard in the playing of the Los Angeles Philharmonic--those inconsistencies, plus differing levels of interest displayed by members of that resident Bowl orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA
To the casual observer, Stephen Hough may seem like a young pianist who has it all: technique and facility, an intriguing repertory, an intelligent and probing musical mind. And he does--as far as it goes. At the British pianist's latest Southern California recital, Friday night at UCLA, he put together a joy of a program, then failed to get the most out of it. Hough's lacks are easy to list, difficult to remedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The critical curmudgeon didn't approach Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday with any special enthusiasm. Previous encounters with Ivan Fischer, the 36-year-old guest conductor from Hungary, had led one to expect competence rather than brilliance. Stephen Hough, the 26-year-old soloist from England, was, one feared, just another member of a sprawling new generation of musicians generally regarded as "promising."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The official hype for Daniel Lentz's "An American in L.A.," which was given its world premiere Thursday by David Alan Miller and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, optimistically likened the 46-year-old composer to such "iconoclasts" as Charles Ives, John Cage, Elliott Carter and Steve Reich. "In the style of the true maverick," we were told, "Lentz is almost gleefully anticipating disapproval from the local academics." This observer doesn't happen to think of himself as an academic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The conductor of the first work on the first concert of the Gold Medal series--which presents young artists--at Ambassador Auditorium Monday night will be, appropriately enough, a 20-year-old musician of multiple gifts. Leading the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra in the overture to Mozart's "Don Giovanni" will be Lucas Richman, recipient of the 1984 conductor-in-training grant from YMF.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA and MARC SHULGOLD
Reached at his London hotel just after one midnight last week, Andrew Litton has just returned from a nine-hour recording session with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra spent on Mahler's First Symphony. He sounds a bit tired. "I'm not sure I will make any sense," says the 28-year-old American conductor, who leads concerts at Hollywood Bowl this coming weekend and the week of July 21, "but fire away."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The official hype for Daniel Lentz's "An American in L.A.," which was given its world premiere Thursday by David Alan Miller and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, optimistically likened the 46-year-old composer to such "iconoclasts" as Charles Ives, John Cage, Elliott Carter and Steve Reich. "In the style of the true maverick," we were told, "Lentz is almost gleefully anticipating disapproval from the local academics." This observer doesn't happen to think of himself as an academic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1988
That self-confessedly "most noble, most misunderstood humanitarian, critic, lutanist, poet," etc., Sixtus Beckmesser, has made his annual complaint about "celebrations of mediocrity" at the Hollywood Bowl ("The Beckmesser Awards of 1987," by Martin Bernheimer, Dec. 27). Obviously, his definition of mediocrity encompasses the following artists, who were among whose who graced the Bowl stage last summer: Emanuel Ax, Alfred Brendel, Leonard Bernstein, Yefim Bronfman, Alicia de Larrocha, Edo de Waart, Charles Dutoit, Richard Goode, Lynn Harrell, Stephen Hough, Christa Ludwig, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Itzhak Perlman, Andre Previn, Florence Quivar, Peter Roesel, Leonard Slatkin, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and Krystian Zimerman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The critical curmudgeon didn't approach Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday with any special enthusiasm. Previous encounters with Ivan Fischer, the 36-year-old guest conductor from Hungary, had led one to expect competence rather than brilliance. Stephen Hough, the 26-year-old soloist from England, was, one feared, just another member of a sprawling new generation of musicians generally regarded as "promising."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA and MARC SHULGOLD
Reached at his London hotel just after one midnight last week, Andrew Litton has just returned from a nine-hour recording session with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra spent on Mahler's First Symphony. He sounds a bit tired. "I'm not sure I will make any sense," says the 28-year-old American conductor, who leads concerts at Hollywood Bowl this coming weekend and the week of July 21, "but fire away."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Stridency and murkiness are two familiar, too-familiar qualities of sound we are hearing at Hollywood Bowl this summer--often in the same performances. Inconsistencies of amplification may sometimes account for the perceived, alternating brightness and turgidity of tone heard in the playing of the Los Angeles Philharmonic--those inconsistencies, plus differing levels of interest displayed by members of that resident Bowl orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The conductor of the first work on the first concert of the Gold Medal series--which presents young artists--at Ambassador Auditorium Monday night will be, appropriately enough, a 20-year-old musician of multiple gifts. Leading the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra in the overture to Mozart's "Don Giovanni" will be Lucas Richman, recipient of the 1984 conductor-in-training grant from YMF.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES
The Angeles String Quartet will open the Orange County Performing Arts Center's 2001-02 concert series at 4 p.m. Nov. 11 with a program to be announced. The chamber music series, to be held in Founders Hall, will continue: * Dec. 1, 8 p.m.: Emerson String Quartet: Works by Haydn, Beethoven, Bartok. * Jan. 2, 8 p.m.: American String Quartet, with violist Brian Dembow: Works by Mozart, Dvorak, Bartok. * Feb. 24, 4 p.m.: Academy of St.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Staples of Hollywood Bowl repertory, lo these seven decades, Rachmaninoff's Third Piano Concerto and Richard Strauss' "Also sprach Zarathustra," reappeared on the penultimate program conducted by Neeme Jarvi, Thursday night in Cahuenga Pass. The Los Angeles Philharmonic again brought to both works its considerable capabilities, its various soloists strutting their instrumental virtues within tasteful bounds, its choirs maintaining equable balances, its sound resources consistently on display.
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