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Stephen J Cannell

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NEWS
October 26, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bad news is impartial in Stephen J. Cannell's latest thriller--at least as far as the Pac-10 is concerned. Stacy Richardson, a doctoral candidate in microbiology at USC, hears that her husband, Max, a professor on sabbatical at a secret bio-weapons lab at Ft. Detrick, Md., has committed suicide. Across town, ex-UCLA quarterback and Gulf War hero Cris Cunningham slides into alcoholism after his 3-year-old daughter dies of a gruesome disease he brought back from Iraq.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Stephen J. Cannell, the prolific television writer and producer who co-created "The Rockford Files" and "The A-Team" and later became a bestselling novelist, has died. He was 69. Cannell died Thursday evening of complications associated with melanoma at his home in Pasadena, his family said. In a career that began in the late 1960s when he sold his first TV script and took off as he soon became the hottest young writer on the Universal lot, Cannell created or co-created more than 40 TV shows, including "Baa Baa Black Sheep," "Baretta," "The Greatest American Hero" and "21 Jump Street.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not the same old "Wiseguy" that will be kicking off its fourth season Saturday night. The CBS series will boast a new star, Steven Bauer, a new female cast member, a new co-executive producer and a new writing staff. "It is sort of like bringing it back from the dead," said Stephen J. Cannell, the co-creator and executive producer who has returned to "Wiseguy."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Boucher is a Times staff writer.
Stephen J. Cannell groaned when ABC executives first broached the idea of creating a superhero show. "I never got superheroes. I had severe dyslexia as a kid so I didn't really get into reading comics. And then when I became a writer, I didn't like them because they had everything. If the only thing that can get you is a piece of kryptonite, then that's not very interesting to me; I was always more interested in the flaws in character." Finding flaws in tough guys has been a signature for Cannell, who created or co-created "The Rockford Files," "Baa Baa Black Sheep" and "Baretta."
NEWS
March 12, 1989
"Wiseguy" is the best show on television. The writing and acting is superb and is worthy of an A+ grade. I will be one of the show's biggest fans until the very end. Thank you, Ken Wahl and Stephen J. Cannell, for one of the best television shows to come along in some time. Peter J. De Mark, Garden Grove
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2005
Novelist and prolific television writer Stephen J. Cannell will be honored Sunday by the Southern California chapter of the Mystery Writers of America. Cannell will be presented with the Marlowe Award at an 11 a.m. brunch at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. Tickets for the event, which is open to the public, are $50. For information: Call (310) 238-0264 or log on to .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Los Angeles police have arrested an account manager on charges of embezzling more than $725,000 from the accounts of Charlton Heston and producer Stephen J. Cannell. Sharon M. Walker, 56, is charged with grand theft, forgery and filing false tax returns, according to Deputy Dist. Atty. Marisa Zarate. Zarate said Walker was accused of stealing more than $157,000 from Heston, the Oscar-winning actor who died April 5, and more than $567,000 from Cannell, an Emmy-winning writer and producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997
Unless the nature of his career has included the incoherent, hallucinatory, delusional thinking characteristic of a schizophrenic psychosis, Stephen J. Cannell is mistaken in referring to "the kind of schizophrenic career I've had" ("Banging Out a New Ending," by Bruce Newman, June 1). Schizophrenia refers to a group of psychoses formerly referred to as "dementia praecox." The fact that current dictionaries no longer condone nonmedical definitions of schizophrenia does little to help the misuse they encouraged for so long.
NEWS
November 11, 1990
I, and many women I know, are furious with Stephen J. Cannell for quarreling with and getting rid of Ken Wahl. Without him, "Wiseguy" is just another violent show. We all loved Vinnie and wanted there to be more of him and his love life, and less of the many gangsters. Cannell left Vinnie--half out of his mind after that horrible episode in that wet little Oregon town with the crazy mayor--delivering disgusting bloody garbage to the dump and stealing watches for money. What is all this nonsense--a grudge of some kind?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Boucher is a Times staff writer.
Stephen J. Cannell groaned when ABC executives first broached the idea of creating a superhero show. "I never got superheroes. I had severe dyslexia as a kid so I didn't really get into reading comics. And then when I became a writer, I didn't like them because they had everything. If the only thing that can get you is a piece of kryptonite, then that's not very interesting to me; I was always more interested in the flaws in character." Finding flaws in tough guys has been a signature for Cannell, who created or co-created "The Rockford Files," "Baa Baa Black Sheep" and "Baretta."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Los Angeles police have arrested an account manager on charges of embezzling more than $725,000 from the accounts of Charlton Heston and producer Stephen J. Cannell. Sharon M. Walker, 56, is charged with grand theft, forgery and filing false tax returns, according to Deputy Dist. Atty. Marisa Zarate. Zarate said Walker was accused of stealing more than $157,000 from Heston, the Oscar-winning actor who died April 5, and more than $567,000 from Cannell, an Emmy-winning writer and producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2005
Novelist and prolific television writer Stephen J. Cannell will be honored Sunday by the Southern California chapter of the Mystery Writers of America. Cannell will be presented with the Marlowe Award at an 11 a.m. brunch at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. Tickets for the event, which is open to the public, are $50. For information: Call (310) 238-0264 or log on to .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2005 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
Stephen J.Cannell's latest Shane Scully police procedural arrives just in time for the debate in Congress over extending the USA Patriot Act. That antiterrorism legislation, quickly passed in response to the events of Sept. 11, 2001, expanded law enforcement powers in ways that rise up and bite the fictional Los Angeles cops hunting a serial killer in "Cold Hit." They find themselves being bugged, threatened and detained by R.A.
BOOKS
February 29, 2004 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
A "vertical coffin," in SWAT-team parlance, is a doorway, a spot where police officers raiding a building are most vulnerable to gunfire. Several characters are killed in doorways in Stephen J. Cannell's latest crime novel featuring LAPD detective Sgt. Shane Scully. The first is Deputy Emo Rojas, gunned down when he tries to arrest a man rumored to be stocking assault rifles and military explosives in a tract house in Agoura Hills.
BOOKS
May 6, 2001 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review
A pro, that's what T. Jefferson Parker is. His plots are intricate, keenly crafted, clearly mapped; his characters complicated, yet consistent; their dialogue subordinate to fast-moving action. Clues and misdirections are fairly sown about, puzzles are plausibly unraveled, the narrative world is eventually restored to order even when, as in "Silent Joe," its prelapsarian state is habitual disorder. Many mysteries turn about loss and grief often, though not always, caused by murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2000 | STEPHEN J. CANNELL
Editor's note: A prolific writer and producer responsible for such shows as "The Rockford Files" and "The A-Team," Stephen J. Cannell ran his own company and was producing several prime-time series--including "Wiseguy," "Hunter" and "Sonny Spoon"--when the last Writers Guild of America strike occurred in 1988. In the last five years, he has become a novelist, writing a half-dozen books, his latest being "The Tin Collectors."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
They are Hollywood's hyphenates, on strike against themselves the past four months in something akin to occupational schizophrenia. One moment they are active rank-and-file members of the Writers Guild of America picketing CBS or Walt Disney. The next they are management, fretting because work has stopped on their productions, furloughing longtime employees and discussing negotiations with the same studio heads and network executives they are striking. "I have a foot in both camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was enough confusion surrounding the future of Ken Wahl and "Wiseguy" Friday to warrant an investigation by undercover agent Vinnie Terranova. CBS pulled the hourlong drama from its prime-time schedule last Tuesday with the promise that it would be remodeled and returned to the air next winter at mid-season.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bad news is impartial in Stephen J. Cannell's latest thriller--at least as far as the Pac-10 is concerned. Stacy Richardson, a doctoral candidate in microbiology at USC, hears that her husband, Max, a professor on sabbatical at a secret bio-weapons lab at Ft. Detrick, Md., has committed suicide. Across town, ex-UCLA quarterback and Gulf War hero Cris Cunningham slides into alcoholism after his 3-year-old daughter dies of a gruesome disease he brought back from Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997
Unless the nature of his career has included the incoherent, hallucinatory, delusional thinking characteristic of a schizophrenic psychosis, Stephen J. Cannell is mistaken in referring to "the kind of schizophrenic career I've had" ("Banging Out a New Ending," by Bruce Newman, June 1). Schizophrenia refers to a group of psychoses formerly referred to as "dementia praecox." The fact that current dictionaries no longer condone nonmedical definitions of schizophrenia does little to help the misuse they encouraged for so long.
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