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Stephen J Pyne

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BOOKS
January 18, 1987 | Michael Parfit, Parfit is the author of "South Light, a Journey to the Last Continent "(Macmillan)
Antarctica is like space: a baffling place, only slightly understood. People who go there are jolted by the experience; many have trouble sorting it into their previous conceptions of life and the planet. Writers first struggle to describe the eeriness, the excitement, and the grandeur of a landscape that is so different that most metaphors are meaningless; and then they try to place it within the literature of a civilization whose entire world has always been green. Their efforts often fail.
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MAGAZINE
October 20, 2002 | Wade Graham, Wade Graham last wrote for the magazine about artist James Turrell's Roden Crater project.
Just beyond the sprawling outskirts of Phoenix, the heat is 111 degrees and the rush-hour traffic shimmers like a mirage. A billboard filled with verdant pine trees beckons: ''Come to the real Arizona.'' To the northeast, the landscape climbs from 1,500 feet in the Valley of the Sun to 7,000 feet along the forested Mogollon Rim, a magnet for vacation homes and retirement communities drawn by the promise of trout in cool streams and elk grazing beneath the ponderosa pines.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's something enchanting but also unsettling about Stephen J. Pyne's fascination with fire: "A brooding, ineffable, sometimes fatal presence that from time to time could burst forth with terrifying effect, a psychological as much as a physical presence, a nightmare out of a Gondwana Dreamtime," he writes in "Burning Bush."
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is it possible to write a bad book about the Grand Canyon? At times in "How the Canyon Became Grand," Stephen J. Pyne seems to prove that it is. But then Pyne's genial nature and the magnificence of his subject combine to make this tale one worth looking at. The publishers are calling this book a "tour de force," but they may be saying perhaps more than they intend.
BOOKS
December 10, 1995
Many of us fear fire: that brooding, ineffable, sometimes fatal presence that can burst forth with terrifying effect. But not Stephen J. Pyne. Pyne has fought fire firsthand (his work as a fire crew chief in the Grand Canyon is described in his 1989 book "Fire on the Rim"). But Pyne has also come to see it as an essential, "conscious geological power" without which Earth's biodiversity and ecological harmony would collapse.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Year of the Fires" is a jumbled yet in the end convincing account of the origins of contemporary American attitudes toward forest fires. Stephen J. Pyne, a professor at Arizona State who has made a career of writing books about fires around the world, turns his attention here to the huge fires in Idaho and Montana in 1910 that finally persuaded the guardians of the nation's forests to protect them by eliminating fire as much as possible.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 2002 | Wade Graham, Wade Graham last wrote for the magazine about artist James Turrell's Roden Crater project.
Just beyond the sprawling outskirts of Phoenix, the heat is 111 degrees and the rush-hour traffic shimmers like a mirage. A billboard filled with verdant pine trees beckons: ''Come to the real Arizona.'' To the northeast, the landscape climbs from 1,500 feet in the Valley of the Sun to 7,000 feet along the forested Mogollon Rim, a magnet for vacation homes and retirement communities drawn by the promise of trout in cool streams and elk grazing beneath the ponderosa pines.
NEWS
April 8, 1993
The Academy of American Poets and the Lannan Foundation will present the following programs at Center Green Theatre, Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Ave., West Hollywood. At 7:30 p.m. today, ethnobiologist Gary Paul Nabhan and poet Richard Shelton will particpate in "Gathering the Desert: Water and Desert Ecology," an evening of readings and discussion on the American desert. Writer and naturalist Ann Zwinger will introduce and moderate the event. Admission is free. On April 15 at 7:30 p.m.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Year of the Fires" is a jumbled yet in the end convincing account of the origins of contemporary American attitudes toward forest fires. Stephen J. Pyne, a professor at Arizona State who has made a career of writing books about fires around the world, turns his attention here to the huge fires in Idaho and Montana in 1910 that finally persuaded the guardians of the nation's forests to protect them by eliminating fire as much as possible.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is it possible to write a bad book about the Grand Canyon? At times in "How the Canyon Became Grand," Stephen J. Pyne seems to prove that it is. But then Pyne's genial nature and the magnificence of his subject combine to make this tale one worth looking at. The publishers are calling this book a "tour de force," but they may be saying perhaps more than they intend.
BOOKS
December 10, 1995
Many of us fear fire: that brooding, ineffable, sometimes fatal presence that can burst forth with terrifying effect. But not Stephen J. Pyne. Pyne has fought fire firsthand (his work as a fire crew chief in the Grand Canyon is described in his 1989 book "Fire on the Rim"). But Pyne has also come to see it as an essential, "conscious geological power" without which Earth's biodiversity and ecological harmony would collapse.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's something enchanting but also unsettling about Stephen J. Pyne's fascination with fire: "A brooding, ineffable, sometimes fatal presence that from time to time could burst forth with terrifying effect, a psychological as much as a physical presence, a nightmare out of a Gondwana Dreamtime," he writes in "Burning Bush."
BOOKS
January 18, 1987 | Michael Parfit, Parfit is the author of "South Light, a Journey to the Last Continent "(Macmillan)
Antarctica is like space: a baffling place, only slightly understood. People who go there are jolted by the experience; many have trouble sorting it into their previous conceptions of life and the planet. Writers first struggle to describe the eeriness, the excitement, and the grandeur of a landscape that is so different that most metaphors are meaningless; and then they try to place it within the literature of a civilization whose entire world has always been green. Their efforts often fail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996
Burning nearly 6 million acres, mostly in the West, the brush and forest fires of 1996 have been the most extensive in three decades. The year's conflagrations are the third most expensive ever, costing taxpayers more than $640 million to fight them. Increasingly in recent years, flames have taken a heavy toll on California. While the state lost 3,500 structures to wildfires between 1920 and 1989, for example, 4,500 structures were destroyed in 1990-93 alone.
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