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Stephen Jay Gould

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January 19, 1993 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By now it is hard for me to imagine what it would be like to read Stephen Jay Gould for the first time. He is known quantity, his arguments a familiar part of the debate that has enlivened the overlapping sciences of evolutionary biology, paleontology and even planetary science for the past two decades. "Eight Little Piggies," his sixth collection of the monthly essays that have appeared in Natural History magazine since 1974, offers us another good read but no surprises.
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BOOKS
May 27, 2007 | Sara Lippincott, Sara Lippincott is an assistant editor of Book Review. sara.lippincott@latimes.com.
THE paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould died of lung cancer five years ago, at age 60. On the first of what will surely be a string of future Gould celebrations, his longtime publisher, W.W. Norton, has issued "The Richness of Life," an anthology of his writings, drawn from his more than 20 books, most of them compiled from numerous essays and magazine pieces -- 300 columns in Natural History magazine alone.
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BOOKS
October 20, 1996 | Michael Shermer, Michael Shermer is publisher of Skeptic magazine and an adjunct professor in cultural studies at Occidental College. He is also the author of "Why People Believe Weird Things," due next spring
For the past 15 summers, I have either competed in or directed "Race Across America," a 3,000-mile, nonstop, transcontinental bicycle race. In the race's first decade, the transcontinental record plummeted from 12 days and 3 hours to 7 days and 23 hours, but for the past five years it hasn't budged even though half of the cyclists routinely break earlier records. Why?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stephen Jay Gould, an influential evolutionary biologist, prolific essayist and passionate New York Yankees fan, died Monday of cancer at his home in New York City. Unfailingly witty, frequently controversial and occasionally combative, Gould, 60, was one of the best-known scientists of his generation. For many, he became the public face of science--a quick sketch of heavy-lidded eyes and a knowing half-smile separated by a thick, brush mustache.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | FREDERIC GOLDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Short and stocky with a shock of graying black hair, he doesn't exactly look like Woody Allen, but he shares the impish New York filmmaker's reaction to Los Angeles. "When do my feet get to touch the ground?" grumps Stephen Jay Gould as his chauffeured car crawls through traffic toward yet another appointment.
BOOKS
October 29, 1989 | Allan J. Tobin, Tobin teaches neuroscience and biology at UCLA and is scientific director of the Hereditary Disease Foundation. and
Stephen Jay Gould's new book, "Wonderful Life," recounts two fascinating and previously little-known stories, one about evolution and the other about evolutionary science. The first concerns the relationships between present life on our planet and a set of strange and ancient animals. The second, told as a five-act drama, recounts how three British scientists came to understand these relationships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | Noaki Schwartz, (949) 574-4232
Tickets for the evening lectures in the library's Distinguished Speaker Series nearly sold out Monday, the first day of sale, board chairman Jim Wood said. Evening lectures by the following have sold out: Orville Schell, dean of the graduate school of Journalism at UC Berkeley, in March; NBC anchor and author Tom Brokaw in April; and Stephen Jay Gould, Harvard professor of geology in May. Tickets for author Susan Faludi's lectures on May 19 and 20 are still available.
BOOKS
May 9, 1999
Steve Corn, music industry executive: "Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms" by Stephen Jay Gould (Harmony). "A stimulating blend of science and philosophy. Gould's approach to issues involving science and religion is direct, honest and refreshing. This is a must-read: a wonderful collection of short but insightful essays." **** Melissa Miller Berry, teacher: "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain (Puffin).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | Noaki Schwartz, (949) 574-4232
Tickets for the evening lectures in the library's Distinguished Speaker Series nearly sold out Monday, the first day of sale, board chairman Jim Wood said. Evening lectures by the following have sold out: Orville Schell, dean of the graduate school of Journalism at UC Berkeley, in March; NBC anchor and author Tom Brokaw in April; and Stephen Jay Gould, Harvard professor of geology in May. Tickets for author Susan Faludi's lectures on May 19 and 20 are still available.
BOOKS
May 9, 1999
Steve Corn, music industry executive: "Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms" by Stephen Jay Gould (Harmony). "A stimulating blend of science and philosophy. Gould's approach to issues involving science and religion is direct, honest and refreshing. This is a must-read: a wonderful collection of short but insightful essays." **** Melissa Miller Berry, teacher: "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain (Puffin).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | PETER CLOTHIER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a treat to read good prose--and an increasingly rare one these days. In the currently booming idea mill industry, language is no more than a piece of the machinery, no matter how well tooled. What a pleasure, then, when an author engages us with evident delight in the subtle dance of language and ideas. This alone would be reason enough to recommend Stephen Jay Gould's little book, "Rocks of Ages," which actually has the feel and heft of a long essay.
BOOKS
October 20, 1996 | Michael Shermer, Michael Shermer is publisher of Skeptic magazine and an adjunct professor in cultural studies at Occidental College. He is also the author of "Why People Believe Weird Things," due next spring
For the past 15 summers, I have either competed in or directed "Race Across America," a 3,000-mile, nonstop, transcontinental bicycle race. In the race's first decade, the transcontinental record plummeted from 12 days and 3 hours to 7 days and 23 hours, but for the past five years it hasn't budged even though half of the cyclists routinely break earlier records. Why?
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | FREDERIC GOLDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Short and stocky with a shock of graying black hair, he doesn't exactly look like Woody Allen, but he shares the impish New York filmmaker's reaction to Los Angeles. "When do my feet get to touch the ground?" grumps Stephen Jay Gould as his chauffeured car crawls through traffic toward yet another appointment.
NEWS
January 19, 1993 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By now it is hard for me to imagine what it would be like to read Stephen Jay Gould for the first time. He is known quantity, his arguments a familiar part of the debate that has enlivened the overlapping sciences of evolutionary biology, paleontology and even planetary science for the past two decades. "Eight Little Piggies," his sixth collection of the monthly essays that have appeared in Natural History magazine since 1974, offers us another good read but no surprises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stephen Jay Gould, an influential evolutionary biologist, prolific essayist and passionate New York Yankees fan, died Monday of cancer at his home in New York City. Unfailingly witty, frequently controversial and occasionally combative, Gould, 60, was one of the best-known scientists of his generation. For many, he became the public face of science--a quick sketch of heavy-lidded eyes and a knowing half-smile separated by a thick, brush mustache.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is nothing quite like a conversation with Stephen Jay Gould to knock a little evolutionary humility into a person. Man--or even woman--as the crowning achievement of some grand cosmic plan? What mortal conceit. "We're an afterthought," said Gould, the distinguished paleontologist, essayist, Harvard University professor and author. "A little accidental twig." The desire "to see evolution as predictably preparatory for the evolution of human consciousness . . .
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is nothing quite like a conversation with Stephen Jay Gould to knock a little evolutionary humility into a person. Man--or even woman--as the crowning achievement of some grand cosmic plan? What mortal conceit. "We're an afterthought," said Gould, the distinguished paleontologist, essayist, Harvard University professor and author. "A little accidental twig." The desire "to see evolution as predictably preparatory for the evolution of human consciousness . . .
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