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Stephen Jesse Cisneros

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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A veteran jailhouse informant whose testimony helped send three Los Angeles County men to prison for life terms now says he lied at their murder trials at the urging of police. Stephen Jesse Cisneros, a convicted arsonist, kidnaper and rapist serving a 70-year prison term, says he perjured himself when he testified that all three men confessed to him.
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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In the first conviction to be overturned in the jailhouse informant scandal, a judge Friday ruled that a Montebello man serving a life sentence for murder is entitled to a new trial. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Alexander H. Williams III made the ruling after the district attorney's office admitted it had inadvertently failed to disclose information jurors should have had, and joined a defense request to reverse the conviction.
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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In the first conviction to be overturned in the jailhouse informant scandal, a judge Friday ruled that a Montebello man serving a life sentence for murder is entitled to a new trial. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Alexander H. Williams III made the ruling after the district attorney's office admitted it had inadvertently failed to disclose information jurors should have had, and joined a defense request to reverse the conviction.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
At least 10 women paid a heavy price for deals the district attorney's office made with a jailhouse informant. They were kidnaped or raped. Some of the county's most respected career prosecutors made the deals, twice persuading judges to release the informant, Stephen Jesse Cisneros, from jail. Cisneros, a mentally disturbed sex offender, was in jail each time for attempted rape. In each case, prosecutors traded him his freedom for information he provided on murder cases.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
At least 10 women paid a heavy price for deals the district attorney's office made with a jailhouse informant. They were kidnaped or raped. Some of the county's most respected career prosecutors made the deals, twice persuading judges to release the informant, Stephen Jesse Cisneros, from jail. Cisneros, a mentally disturbed sex offender, was in jail each time for attempted rape. In each case, prosecutors traded him his freedom for information he provided on murder cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989
Four years after Southland residents were terrorized by a savage series of random attacks, Night Stalker Richard Ramirez was convicted of 13 counts of murder and sentenced to die in the gas chamber at San Quentin. The devil-worshiping drifter from El Paso delivered a chilling monologue before being escorted in chains from a Los Angeles courtroom for the last time. "I am beyond good and evil," he declared. "I will be avenged."
NEWS
January 12, 1985 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
A man dubbed the "Los Angeles River Rapist" by authorities, because he allegedly sexually assaulted several illegal alien women in the riverbed after abducting them by posing as a law enforcement officer, pleaded innocent Friday to various felony charges. At his arraignment before Municipal Judge Elva Soper, Stephen Jesse Cisneros, 34, an East Los Angeles tow truck operator, pleaded innocent to 34 felony counts, including kidnaping, rape, oral copulation, sodomy and robbery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In the second case of its kind to grow out of the jailhouse informant scandal, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office has conceded that a convicted murderer is entitled to a new trial because prosecutors failed to disclose to the defense damaging information about an informant's credibility. The district attorney's office in effect acknowledged that the lack of disclosure, which it said was unintentional, interfered with a fair trial for Arthur Grajeda.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The jailhouse informant who started a scandal more than a year ago by demonstrating the ease with which he could fake an inmate's confession now says he committed perjury in a dozen cases, most involving major felonies. The informant, Leslie Vernon White, laid out details of his perjuries for the first time in an interview with The Times. "I'm just basically going to tell the truth and if the D.A.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The homicide detective thought he knew the identity of a murderer but couldn't prove it. To make his case, he wanted a confession. But his suspect wouldn't talk. Los Angeles Police Detective Philip Sowers did what one prosecutor said a lot of detectives do. He turned to the informant tank at Los Angeles County Jail for help.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A veteran jailhouse informant whose testimony helped send three Los Angeles County men to prison for life terms now says he lied at their murder trials at the urging of police. Stephen Jesse Cisneros, a convicted arsonist, kidnaper and rapist serving a 70-year prison term, says he perjured himself when he testified that all three men confessed to him.
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