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Stephen Johnson

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NATIONAL
June 9, 2005 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson predicted Wednesday that safeguarding the country's water supply -- from terrorists and pollutants -- would be one of the pressing environmental concerns of the 21st century. "I believe water, over the next decade and further, will be the environmental issue that we as a nation and, frankly, as a world will be facing," he said. Keeping the nation's water safe and secure is "an area of vulnerability for the United States and also an opportunity for us."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
FROM the moment he took on the expansion of the Griffith Observatory a decade ago, Stephen Johnson knew his work would not go unnoticed. "More than any other project we've worked on, this is an incredibly visible one," says Johnson, 56, a polished, slightly formal principal architect in the Los Angeles office of Pfeiffer Partners. "From where we're sitting, we can see almost the whole city." And it means that any misstep won't remain a private disappointment.
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OPINION
December 31, 2003
Re "Iran Quake Rescuers on Verge of Giving Up," Dec. 29: I am dismayed to learn that Iran will not accept help from Israel to aid those suffering from the earthquake. Do food, water, shelter and medical supplies have religion, ethnicity or politics? Stephen Johnson Long Beach
NATIONAL
June 9, 2005 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson predicted Wednesday that safeguarding the country's water supply -- from terrorists and pollutants -- would be one of the pressing environmental concerns of the 21st century. "I believe water, over the next decade and further, will be the environmental issue that we as a nation and, frankly, as a world will be facing," he said. Keeping the nation's water safe and secure is "an area of vulnerability for the United States and also an opportunity for us."
MAGAZINE
May 15, 1988
Thanks for "L.A. 2013: A Day in the Life," by Nicole Yorkin (April 3). By printing it you rendered a valuable service--confirming my feeling that L.A. is not a place in which I wish to be living in the year 2013. And what did your article portray? A society with a childish fascination for (and dependence on) technology and its "wonders," a fatalistic attitude toward overcrowding and environmental problems, and a slavish dedication to economic and political philosophies that are no longer supportable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Kudos to Paterson for her insightful column. Unfortunately, the situation she describes pertains not just to the dying, but to the living as well. Witness the rise of the health-and-fitness movement which offers simplistic answers to complex questions. It has done much to shape current attitudes towards death and dying. And it encourages society to view as "unhealthy" people who being neither sick nor diseased don't conform to certain modes of behavior. The situation described in Paterson's article, and America's growing obsession with "healthy" life styles suggests a dangerous trend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1986
It's bad enough when the government tries to protect us from ourselves. Laws say you have to wear seat belts. Building codes tell us where we can put light switches, and smoke alarms, even though we have enough common sense to be doing it right in the first place. Now, however, we're getting it from The Times. You didn't run Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury strip, because you didn't like it. That's what it comes down to, in spite of all the "due to content" lingo you crank out, isn't it?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
FROM the moment he took on the expansion of the Griffith Observatory a decade ago, Stephen Johnson knew his work would not go unnoticed. "More than any other project we've worked on, this is an incredibly visible one," says Johnson, 56, a polished, slightly formal principal architect in the Los Angeles office of Pfeiffer Partners. "From where we're sitting, we can see almost the whole city." And it means that any misstep won't remain a private disappointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2005 | Erica Williams, Times Staff Writer
When Marine Cpl. Stephen P. Johnson's mother got the news of her 24-year-old son's death in a helicopter crash in Iraq that killed 31 troops, she was baby-sitting his 1-year-old son, Tyler. It was 9:30 p.m. Jan. 27 when two military officers showed up on the doorstep of Roni Aurelio's home in Yreka, Calif. She had just put Tyler down to sleep. "I almost slammed the door, but I let them in," said Aurelio, 48.
BOOKS
June 6, 1993 | Michael Nava, Nava is a lawyer and a writer. His forthcoming books are "Created Equal: Why Gay Rights Matter to America" (with Robert Dawidoff) from St. Martin's Press in early 1994 and "The Last Days," a novel, from Putnam in 1995. He collects photography
At once vast and intimate, California's central valley is more than the state's heartland, it is its heart. For those of us who grew up on its farms and in its towns and cities, it was also a place where dreams began in the heat of summer or on the foggy winter mornings so perfectly depicted by Stephen Johnson's and Robert Dawson's photographs.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2005 | James Gerstenzang and Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writers
President Bush reached into the ranks of the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday and nominated its acting administrator, Stephen L. Johnson, to head the office where he has worked for 24 years. Johnson, 53, a biologist and pathologist, would be the first scientist and first career EPA employee to head the agency, which was established in 1970 as the environmental movement took hold across the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2005 | Erica Williams, Times Staff Writer
When Marine Cpl. Stephen P. Johnson's mother got the news of her 24-year-old son's death in a helicopter crash in Iraq that killed 31 troops, she was baby-sitting his 1-year-old son, Tyler. It was 9:30 p.m. Jan. 27 when two military officers showed up on the doorstep of Roni Aurelio's home in Yreka, Calif. She had just put Tyler down to sleep. "I almost slammed the door, but I let them in," said Aurelio, 48.
OPINION
December 31, 2003
Re "Iran Quake Rescuers on Verge of Giving Up," Dec. 29: I am dismayed to learn that Iran will not accept help from Israel to aid those suffering from the earthquake. Do food, water, shelter and medical supplies have religion, ethnicity or politics? Stephen Johnson Long Beach
BOOKS
June 6, 1993 | Michael Nava, Nava is a lawyer and a writer. His forthcoming books are "Created Equal: Why Gay Rights Matter to America" (with Robert Dawidoff) from St. Martin's Press in early 1994 and "The Last Days," a novel, from Putnam in 1995. He collects photography
At once vast and intimate, California's central valley is more than the state's heartland, it is its heart. For those of us who grew up on its farms and in its towns and cities, it was also a place where dreams began in the heat of summer or on the foggy winter mornings so perfectly depicted by Stephen Johnson's and Robert Dawson's photographs.
MAGAZINE
May 15, 1988
Thanks for "L.A. 2013: A Day in the Life," by Nicole Yorkin (April 3). By printing it you rendered a valuable service--confirming my feeling that L.A. is not a place in which I wish to be living in the year 2013. And what did your article portray? A society with a childish fascination for (and dependence on) technology and its "wonders," a fatalistic attitude toward overcrowding and environmental problems, and a slavish dedication to economic and political philosophies that are no longer supportable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Kudos to Paterson for her insightful column. Unfortunately, the situation she describes pertains not just to the dying, but to the living as well. Witness the rise of the health-and-fitness movement which offers simplistic answers to complex questions. It has done much to shape current attitudes towards death and dying. And it encourages society to view as "unhealthy" people who being neither sick nor diseased don't conform to certain modes of behavior. The situation described in Paterson's article, and America's growing obsession with "healthy" life styles suggests a dangerous trend.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2005 | James Gerstenzang and Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writers
President Bush reached into the ranks of the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday and nominated its acting administrator, Stephen L. Johnson, to head the office where he has worked for 24 years. Johnson, 53, a biologist and pathologist, would be the first scientist and first career EPA employee to head the agency, which was established in 1970 as the environmental movement took hold across the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2006 | Chuck Neubauer and Richard T. Cooper, Times Staff Writers
Even now, as heavy equipment peels back the cactus and creosote bush to carve out roads and building sites, it's hard to believe that this 67-square-mile tract of empty desert will blossom into one of the biggest cities in the fastest-growing state in the country and the projected home to more than 200,000 people. One of the most inhospitable places in the country, Coyote Springs Valley is so barren that, until recently, its best use was thought to be as a weapons test range.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1986
It's bad enough when the government tries to protect us from ourselves. Laws say you have to wear seat belts. Building codes tell us where we can put light switches, and smoke alarms, even though we have enough common sense to be doing it right in the first place. Now, however, we're getting it from The Times. You didn't run Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury strip, because you didn't like it. That's what it comes down to, in spite of all the "due to content" lingo you crank out, isn't it?
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