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Stephen Kanner

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The area around Lafayette and MacArthur parks, just west of downtown Los Angeles, is home to a number of remarkable and somewhat vain postwar landmarks, including DMJM's dramatically veiled American Cement Building from 1964 and the mirrored, painterly 1972 Superior Court tower by Langdon and Wilson. That eccentric group has been joined by a far quieter project, the Lafayette Park Recreation Center, which nonetheless stands out as a significant addition to the neighborhood's architectural and urban fabric.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The area around Lafayette and MacArthur parks, just west of downtown Los Angeles, is home to a number of remarkable and somewhat vain postwar landmarks, including DMJM's dramatically veiled American Cement Building from 1964 and the mirrored, painterly 1972 Superior Court tower by Langdon and Wilson. That eccentric group has been joined by a far quieter project, the Lafayette Park Recreation Center, which nonetheless stands out as a significant addition to the neighborhood's architectural and urban fabric.
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MAGAZINE
March 18, 2007 | Barbara Thornburg
MOUNTAIN VIEW * HOMEOWNER: DR. RICHARD FEINSTEIN ARCHITECT: STEPHEN KANNER, KANNER ARCHITECTS, SANTA MONICA * Dr. Richard Feinstein's home in the Santa Monica Mountains above Malibu burned to the ground in 1993. Ten years later he built another home on the same spot. "My friends told me I was crazy to go back, but I love the serenity and the power that comes from the mountains that surround the canyon."
HOME & GARDEN
January 22, 2011 | By Sean Mitchell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Of more than 100 houses that Ray Kappe designed over his long and distinguished career, the one he designed for himself and his family in Los Angeles' Rustic Canyon is the most important. "Maybe the greatest house in Southern California," Stephen Kanner, the former president of American Institute of Architects' Los Angeles chapter, said in a 2008 interview. Indeed, that year, when the Home section polled architects, historians, academics and critics on Southern California's best houses of all time, the 1967 Kappe residence ranked No. 8, just behind Chemosphere by John Lautner and the Gamble House by Charles and Henry Greene.
MAGAZINE
December 8, 2002 | MICHAEL WEBB
The 3,200-square-foot house that architect Stephen Kanner designed for his family is securely anchored to a hillside in Pacific Palisades, but it looks as though it's ready to set sail. Nautical touches such as a tilted frame that looks like a ship's bow, the portholes in the blue mosaic stair tower and the crossed steel rods providing structural support evoke a feeling of being at sea. The entry lobby, with its blue terrazzo floor and railed steps, suggests a ship's bridge.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1988 | VIRGINIA GRAY, Virginia Gray is an associate editor of the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
THIS IS NOT A TYPICAL Southern California beach house. Its type of architecture--in the International Style--has been disparaged by critics as bare, abstract and impersonal. Yet despite the building's stark, modern lines, this particular unit becomes warm and personal when filled with classic modern and antique furnishings. The origins of this project are a multifamily story.
HOME & GARDEN
January 22, 2011 | By Sean Mitchell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Of more than 100 houses that Ray Kappe designed over his long and distinguished career, the one he designed for himself and his family in Los Angeles' Rustic Canyon is the most important. "Maybe the greatest house in Southern California," Stephen Kanner, the former president of American Institute of Architects' Los Angeles chapter, said in a 2008 interview. Indeed, that year, when the Home section polled architects, historians, academics and critics on Southern California's best houses of all time, the 1967 Kappe residence ranked No. 8, just behind Chemosphere by John Lautner and the Gamble House by Charles and Henry Greene.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen Kanner has the polite edginess of a wedding photographer anticipating a drunken reception. He doesn't really want to drive to Koreatown for fear that the two apartment buildings he and his father designed three years ago have, through no fault of theirs, fallen into neglect. He worries about graffiti.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Stephen Kanner, who died earlier this year of pancreatic cancer at age 54, was something of an outlier among architects of his generation for the sheer volume and range of his output. The son and grandson of Los Angeles architects, Kanner moved with near-inevitability into the family business and in his 30s was designing the kinds of projects that most architects these days don't land until they are nearing 60 ? or even 70. With his colleagues in Kanner Architects, which he began running in his early 40s after the 1998 death of his father, he produced expansive private houses, condominium projects, courthouses, guest cottages, rec centers, affordable-housing developments, retail outlets and even a gas station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Stephen Kanner, a third-generation Los Angeles architect known for playful yet functional modern designs who co-founded the city's Architecture and Design Museum, has died. He was 54. Kanner, who also restored landmark buildings in Westwood Village, died of cancer Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said his wife, Cynthia. Two of his more prominent public buildings were tributes to 1950s jet-age architecture — the In-N-Out Burger on Gayley Avenue in Westwood that riffed on the company's boomerang-shaped logo and a gas station at Slauson and La Brea avenues with a swooping canopy inspired by the nearby freeway.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Stephen Kanner, who died earlier this year of pancreatic cancer at age 54, was something of an outlier among architects of his generation for the sheer volume and range of his output. The son and grandson of Los Angeles architects, Kanner moved with near-inevitability into the family business and in his 30s was designing the kinds of projects that most architects these days don't land until they are nearing 60 ? or even 70. With his colleagues in Kanner Architects, which he began running in his early 40s after the 1998 death of his father, he produced expansive private houses, condominium projects, courthouses, guest cottages, rec centers, affordable-housing developments, retail outlets and even a gas station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Stephen Kanner, a third-generation Los Angeles architect known for playful yet functional modern designs who co-founded the city's Architecture and Design Museum, has died. He was 54. Kanner, who also restored landmark buildings in Westwood Village, died of cancer Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said his wife, Cynthia. Two of his more prominent public buildings were tributes to 1950s jet-age architecture — the In-N-Out Burger on Gayley Avenue in Westwood that riffed on the company's boomerang-shaped logo and a gas station at Slauson and La Brea avenues with a swooping canopy inspired by the nearby freeway.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 2007 | Barbara Thornburg
MOUNTAIN VIEW * HOMEOWNER: DR. RICHARD FEINSTEIN ARCHITECT: STEPHEN KANNER, KANNER ARCHITECTS, SANTA MONICA * Dr. Richard Feinstein's home in the Santa Monica Mountains above Malibu burned to the ground in 1993. Ten years later he built another home on the same spot. "My friends told me I was crazy to go back, but I love the serenity and the power that comes from the mountains that surround the canyon."
MAGAZINE
December 8, 2002 | MICHAEL WEBB
The 3,200-square-foot house that architect Stephen Kanner designed for his family is securely anchored to a hillside in Pacific Palisades, but it looks as though it's ready to set sail. Nautical touches such as a tilted frame that looks like a ship's bow, the portholes in the blue mosaic stair tower and the crossed steel rods providing structural support evoke a feeling of being at sea. The entry lobby, with its blue terrazzo floor and railed steps, suggests a ship's bridge.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen Kanner has the polite edginess of a wedding photographer anticipating a drunken reception. He doesn't really want to drive to Koreatown for fear that the two apartment buildings he and his father designed three years ago have, through no fault of theirs, fallen into neglect. He worries about graffiti.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1988 | VIRGINIA GRAY, Virginia Gray is an associate editor of the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
THIS IS NOT A TYPICAL Southern California beach house. Its type of architecture--in the International Style--has been disparaged by critics as bare, abstract and impersonal. Yet despite the building's stark, modern lines, this particular unit becomes warm and personal when filled with classic modern and antique furnishings. The origins of this project are a multifamily story.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1985
Stephen Barrett Kanner was named vice president and public finance officer for the consumer affairs division of California Federal Savings & Loan Assn., Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
In an age when select designers are singled out as "starchitects," celebrated in magazines and in art gallery retrospectives, it is easy to overlook the good gray brigade who set the style for much of what is being built around us. The spectrum of mainstream designers is wide, ranging from those in large offices with staffs of more than 50 to others who prefer small and highly personal practices with only a few associates.
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