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Stephen Karam

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Stephen KARAM was not like other teenagers. For this Scranton, Pa., native, "play" didn't mean pickup basketball or keg parties -- it referred to one-acts he'd write and mail off to publishers and contests listed in the Dramatists Sourcebook. "What kind of 16-year-old does that?" wonders Karam, now 28, with a self-deprecating laugh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Stephen KARAM was not like other teenagers. For this Scranton, Pa., native, "play" didn't mean pickup basketball or keg parties -- it referred to one-acts he'd write and mail off to publishers and contests listed in the Dramatists Sourcebook. "What kind of 16-year-old does that?" wonders Karam, now 28, with a self-deprecating laugh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2012 | By David Ng
The musical "Once" and Stephen Karam's play "Sons of the Prophet" took the top honors at the Lucille Lortel Awards in New York on Sunday. The awards recognize excellence in off-Broadway productions and are presented by the League of Off-Broadway Theatres and Producers. " Once " received the award for best new musical. The production, which is adapted from the popular 2006 indie film of the same name, opened at the New York Theatre Workshop before transferring to Broadway this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
An endearing mash-up of "The Crucible," "Schoolhouse Rock" and "High School Musical," Stephen Karam's "Speech and Debate" has all the virtues of youth: irreverence, smarts, a slight lack of specificity and more innocence than it imagines. Karam's musical comedy attracted some heat in New York, and its West Coast premiere last week at the Blank Theatre Company, under the giddy direction of Daniel Henning, is a welcome excuse to celebrate the burgeoning charms of Mae Whitman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
The National Endowment for the Arts announced $77.2 million in grants Wednesday, including $5 million for California. More than half the total -- $48.8 million - covers the NEA's annual operating grants to state and regional arts agencies. The California Arts Council receives $1.1 million, the largest amount for a state. The grantmaking round included $28.4 million in competitive grants in two categories: $24.8 million for Art Works, which covers arts education, engaging audiences and using the arts as a tool for community improvement, and $3.6 million for Arts in Media, projects involving broadcasting, digital creativity and the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Playwright Stephen Karam has made a splash off-Broadway with one play and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize with another. But for memorable moments in his stage career, he says there's nothing quite like his teenage triumphs in the Blank Theatre's annual young playwrights competition and festival. "When you see people taking your work seriously at that age, it makes a big impression," said Karam, 32. "For the first time I thought of myself as a real writer. " For two decades, the small, Hollywood-based Blank has presented plays and musicals by students 19 and younger with directors such as Barbara Bain and Jeremy Sisto, mentors such as Garry Marshall and Terrence McNally and actors such as Sarah Michelle Gellar, Debra Messing and Chris Pine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Sitting through a succession of new plays on a recent visit to New York, I was reminded of car trips as a child with my grandmother behind the wheel of her gigantic red Lincoln Continental. Her destination was clear, but her route, like those of the playwrights who were chauffeuring me around Broadway, was a guessing game. This was before the age of GPS, which would have been irrelevant for a fur-draped woman who relied on hunches rather than a map. (I recall one interminable journey to Atlantic City, N.J., that had me anxiously pointing out highway signs indicating we were headed elsewhere while she calmly applied another round of lipstick.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Blackbird," Scottish playwright David Harrower's daring two-hander about a young woman who confronts the older man who sexually abused her as a girl, gave Rogue Machine one of its most memorable hits last summer. Would you believe that it was something of a miracle that this highly respected little company was even allowed to produce the play, especially after it became a succès d'estime off-Broadway in a Manhattan Theatre Club production starring Jeff Daniels and Alison Pill?
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