Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen King
IN THE NEWS

Stephen King

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2009 | Jedediah Berry
First, about that dome. We'll be stuck under it with the residents of Chester's Mill, Maine, for most of the thousand-plus pages of Stephen King's impressive new novel, so a few facts may be handy. For starters, it is invisible and impenetrable -- a force field, really, sci-fi flick allusions included. So its sudden manifestation one autumn day causes many bad things to happen. A plane crashes into the dome, some cars and a truck crash into it, flocks of birds crash into it and die. People die too. And King handles these initial catastrophes as he will handle much of the mayhem ahead: with a grim yet almost jocular kind of matter-of-factness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
CBS has set its summer slate, with return dates for "Big Brother" and Stephen King's "Under the Dome" announced -- among others -- and a slight delay for the Halle Berry-Steven Spielberg limited-run series "Extant. " The end of June kicks off the rollout. "Big Brother" will return Wednesday, June 25. New legal drama "Reckless" will make its debut a few days later, on Sunday, June 29, finished off by the third season premiere of "Unforgettable. " Then, on Monday, June 30,  it's time to gear up for people trapped in a bubble, with the return of “Under the Dome.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Stephen King published "The Shining" way back in 1977. It was his fourth novel. A year earlier, his first, "Carrie," had come out as a film directed by Brian De Palma, and had been a huge success. King was big, but he wasn't yet the giant bestselling author he's become. Now, 35 years later, King has gone back to "The Shining" and written a sequel, " Doctor Sleep . " It comes to shelves in January of 2013, just when everyone who might be snowed in will be. "Doctor Sleep" features the now-adult Danny, the child who could see ghosts in the Overlook Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
During its TCA Winter Press Tour day on Wednesday, CBS announced the premiere dates of its two major summer event series, "Extant" and the returning "Under the Dome. " Both series boast Steven Spielberg among their executive producers and have a science-fiction bent, but their stories are very different. "Extant" stars Halle Berry as an astronaut trying to reacquaint herself with her family after spending a year in space. But her time in space has resulted in something very mysterious that the network promises will "change the course of human history.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
In a move to bump up physical book sales, Stephen King will not release an e-book version of his new novel , "Joyland," the Wall Street Journal reports. It's something of a radical move for the man who stood onstage with Amazon's Jeff Bezos in 2009 to introduce the Kindle 2. This time King has decided to throw his support behind brick-and-mortar booksellers. "I have no plans for a digital version," King told the Journal. "In the meantime, let people stir their sticks and go to an actual bookstore rather than a digital one. " However, the print book is still available for pre-order from online retailer Amazon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On the afternoon of New Year's Eve, I spent half an hour or so discussing Stephen King with my colleague David Lazarus on Patt Morrison's KPCC-FM radio show. The news peg, such as it was, involved the decision by the New York Times to include King's new novel, "11/22/63," on its list of the 10 best books of 2011. But the bigger question had to do with King's merit as a writer, which, almost 40 years after he began to publish, remains a source of conversation, if no longer quite debate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times
It's hard to write good baseball fiction. The game is so unlikely, so bizarre at times, that it's a challenge to the fiction writer's imagination to do it justice. Who, for instance, could have invented Johnny Damon's at-bat in the ninth inning of Game 4 of the World Series last fall? He appeared to have been struck out by Brad Lidge (it was a foul tip), only to fight back and hit a single, and went on to steal two bases on a single play. From a near strikeout to third base in just a couple of pitches: You can't make that stuff up. This is the challenge Stephen King faces in "Blockade Billy," a novella (actually more of a long short story)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling horror writer Stephen King appeared on the NPR program "Fresh Air" on Tuesday night to talk about his new book, "Joyland. " While he got to answer some questions about the book, a supernatural riff on classic noir set in a small amusement park, he also got some atypical questions from host Terri Gross. The "Joyland" story, he said, has been in his head for about 20 years. The story began as an image, and then he built it out -- the story is about a college student, after getting dumped by his girlfriend, who moves from the Northeast to North Carolina to work at an amusement park.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Novelist Stephen King is joining the growing list of high-profile writers turning their attention to comic books. King will write a series for Marvel Comics based on his "Dark Tower" books, the company said Friday. It said the comics will explore the early life of King's hero, Roland Deschain. The first issue is due in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
Novelist Stephen King says it was a review he wrote of "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" that led to his hiring as a monthly columnist by Entertainment Weekly. But in his first piece for the magazine, he says he isn't sure whether the editors were responding to the quality of his work or the fact that it was written in longhand.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013
FICTION Americanah Chima manda Ngozi Adichie Knopf, $26.95 While carving her path as a writer in the U.S., an outspoken Nigerian immigrant grapples with culture clash and long-distance love. At Night We Walk in Circles Daniel Alarcón Riverhead, $27.95 In an unnamed Latin American country, an idealistic young actor joins a radical theater troupe for a touring production of an incendiary political play. The Luminaries Eleanor Catton Little, Brown, $27 Twelve townsmen gather in secret to unravel a series of strange events involving a missing notable, a suicidal prostitute and a dead drunk in this Man Booker Prize winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Stephen King has written many, many books, and many of them have been made into films. Some, like "Carrie," more than once. But there are still a few than remain unadapted, so far. Now it's time to take "Cell" off that list. Samuel L. Jackson and John Cusack have signed up to co-star in the adaptation of Stephen King's 2006 novel, the Wrap reports. King will write the screenplay with help from screenwriter Adam Alleca. In "Cell," an artist is in Boston to sign a deal for a comic book when a pulse goes through all cellphones, causing those who were using them at the time to become zombies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Carrie," the horror cult classic based on novelist Stephen King's great girl roar against bullies, body, religion and mom, is back on the big screen with more teen trauma than ever and a new party dress for the prom. And yet…. Directed by "Boys Don't Cry's" Kimberly Peirce and starring an excellent Chloë Grace Moretz with a truly troubling Julianne Moore as Mama, "Carrie" should have delivered more with the material in the filmmaker's feminist hands. Instead, Peirce has done a remaking rather than a reimagining.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
The results this weekend for Tom Hanks' hijacking drama “Captain Phillips” - which took in $26 million in U.S. ticket sales from just more than 3,000 theaters -- are a tricky beast to size up. On the one hand, the movie beat expectations; on the other, it was defeated by a holdover, Sandra Bullock's “Gravity.” Back on that first hand, it was, given how hard it is for stars to open movies, a solid number for a one of the few actors still...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
Canadian writer Emily Schultz published her first novel, “Joyland,” in 2006 on ECW, a small press based in Toronto. A coming-of-age tale set in a video-game arcade, "Joyland" did not make bestseller lists or sell in large quantities. So Schultz was rather surprised when her publisher reported a surprising recent sales bump. And it was all thanks to Stephen King. King published his own novel called “Joyland” back in June.  And his novel, which takes place in an amusement park, is not available as an e-book, so Amazon customers eager to download King's “Joyland” may have mistakenly assumed Schultz's ebook is what they are after.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SAN FRANCISCO - A Stephen King opera had to happen. Many of his 56 novels have been made into movies and have spent time on bestseller lists, making King a king of pop culture accessibility - just what the opera world lusts after these days. Moreover, Maine's master of the supernatural is also fast rising in the ranks of literary respectability. On my way to see Tobias Picker's new opera based on "Dolores Claiborne" at San Francisco Opera on Wednesday night, I stopped off at University Press Books in Berkeley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Pirated e-book versions of Stephen King's "Joyland" have surfaced online. That's notable because King, to support the print book being published by small indie Hard Case Crime, decided not to issue an e-book of this particular novel.  It's not notable, however, in that just about every book Stephen King published is available as a pirated e-book. On one pirate site, major bestselling novels by King available for illicit free download include "The Shining," "The Stand," "Pet Sematary," "It," "The Green Mile," and "The Gunslinger" -- and that's all just one bundled package.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
One of Stephen King's most enduring works is "The Shining," due in part to the film by Stanley Kubrick. Although the film strayed somewhat from the book, both told the terrifying story of a man who moves his family to a remote, empty resort when he becomes caretaker there. The Overlook Hotel, or the ghosts that haunt its hallways, take hold of him and eventually his wife and son desperately try to escape. It's been 36 years since "The Shining" was published, and King has picked up the thread again, writing the first sequel to the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When Stephen King published his third novel, "The Shining," in 1977, he was a writer with a lot on his mind. Initially, he told The Times in 1998, he conceived of the book as "a Shakespearean tragedy, a kind of inside-out 'King Lear,' where Lear is this young guy who has a son instead of daughters. " He even went so far as to divide the first draft into acts and scenes. Make of this what you will, but it suggests that King has always had more at stake than merely to frighten us, that he wants to get at the big themes: love, loss, loyalty, what happens between parents and their kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Looks like there's no escaping the dome just yet. CBS has renewed "Under the Dome" for a second season. That the network would want to squeeze more out of the adaptation of Stephen King's best seller, about a town trapped under a mysterious orb, is hardly surprising. It was the network's most-watched summer premiere since 2000, giving CBS incentive to take advantage of the open-ended option for the event series.  “We're excited to tell more stories about the mystery of the dome and the secrets in Chester's Mill, and are thrilled to have the master storyteller himself, Stephen King, tell the first one of next season,” CBS Entertainment President Nina Tassler said in a statement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|