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Stephen L Carter

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Stephen L. Carter is a formidable legal scholar with a gift for turning out sophisticated, multilayered works of popular fiction. "Jericho's Fall" -- an intricate spy thriller that proceeds at breakneck speed from mystery to revelation and back again -- marks a clear departure in his work, one that is likely to win him an even larger audience, and deservedly so.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Jonathan Shapiro, Special to Tribune newspapers
The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln A Novel Stephen L. Carter Alfred A. Knopf: 517 pp., $26.95 What if Abraham Lincoln had lived? What would have happened? Stephen L. Carter's new novel suggests one answer. "The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln" recasts tragedy as thriller with the living Lincoln on trial for his political life. A bestselling author ("The Emperor of Ocean Park," "Jericho's Fall"), Carter hews to the historical record more than the reader might expect.
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BOOKS
March 17, 1996 | Chris Goodrich, Chris Goodrich took two classes with Stephen Carter while a journalistic fellow at Yale Law in 1986-'87
It's fitting, and not a little ironic, that a book urging renewed attention and respect for the idea of integrity should be published in the midst of a presidential campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Stephen L. Carter is a formidable legal scholar with a gift for turning out sophisticated, multilayered works of popular fiction. "Jericho's Fall" -- an intricate spy thriller that proceeds at breakneck speed from mystery to revelation and back again -- marks a clear departure in his work, one that is likely to win him an even larger audience, and deservedly so.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Jonathan Shapiro, Special to Tribune newspapers
The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln A Novel Stephen L. Carter Alfred A. Knopf: 517 pp., $26.95 What if Abraham Lincoln had lived? What would have happened? Stephen L. Carter's new novel suggests one answer. "The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln" recasts tragedy as thriller with the living Lincoln on trial for his political life. A bestselling author ("The Emperor of Ocean Park," "Jericho's Fall"), Carter hews to the historical record more than the reader might expect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At his first campaign appearance after being named the Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman (D-Conn.) affirmed his religious convictions by uttering a prayer and quoting the Bible. The B'Nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League not long afterward responded by urging Lieberman to keep religion out of politics. Even among co-religionists, it seems, the separation of church and state is an explosive issue--and that is why Stephen L.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yale law professor Stephen L. Carter was only 30 when he was granted tenure, one of the youngest faculty members ever to achieve that cherished badge of academic distinction. Yet Carter concedes that he was admitted to Yale Law School in the first place only because of "the color of my skin."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
ON a recent European vacation, I overheard some locals asking our traveling companions what my husband and I did for a living. They professed surprise at the responses, given all that they knew of African Americans were the gangbangers and athletes they saw via the U.S. media. Guess they hadn't heard about the Huxtables, we joked at the time, not without a bit of rancor on my part born of suffering under the common assumption there is only one, monolithic "black community."
BOOKS
June 2, 2002 | JONATHAN SHAPIRO, Jonathan Shapiro is a writer for the television drama "The Practice." A former federal prosecutor, he is an adjunct law professor at USC.
Law professor Talcott Garland is the privileged son of legendary attorney and Republican stalwart Oliver Garland. Well papered and connected, the Garlands are so established a family that when they summer at their home on Martha's Vineyard, they try to avoid the Kennedys.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"For Americans to take their religion seriously," writes Stephen L. Carter in "The Culture of Disbelief, "is to risk assignment to the lunatic fringe." * No one is likely to regard Carter as a lunatic, but he clearly takes his religion--and all religion--quite seriously. "The Culture of Disbelief" is Carter's spirited call for greater tolerance of religious diversity in what he calls "the public square," a manifesto in favor of the accommodation of religion by law and government.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
ON a recent European vacation, I overheard some locals asking our traveling companions what my husband and I did for a living. They professed surprise at the responses, given all that they knew of African Americans were the gangbangers and athletes they saw via the U.S. media. Guess they hadn't heard about the Huxtables, we joked at the time, not without a bit of rancor on my part born of suffering under the common assumption there is only one, monolithic "black community."
BOOKS
June 2, 2002 | JONATHAN SHAPIRO, Jonathan Shapiro is a writer for the television drama "The Practice." A former federal prosecutor, he is an adjunct law professor at USC.
Law professor Talcott Garland is the privileged son of legendary attorney and Republican stalwart Oliver Garland. Well papered and connected, the Garlands are so established a family that when they summer at their home on Martha's Vineyard, they try to avoid the Kennedys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At his first campaign appearance after being named the Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman (D-Conn.) affirmed his religious convictions by uttering a prayer and quoting the Bible. The B'Nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League not long afterward responded by urging Lieberman to keep religion out of politics. Even among co-religionists, it seems, the separation of church and state is an explosive issue--and that is why Stephen L.
BOOKS
March 17, 1996 | Chris Goodrich, Chris Goodrich took two classes with Stephen Carter while a journalistic fellow at Yale Law in 1986-'87
It's fitting, and not a little ironic, that a book urging renewed attention and respect for the idea of integrity should be published in the midst of a presidential campaign.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"For Americans to take their religion seriously," writes Stephen L. Carter in "The Culture of Disbelief, "is to risk assignment to the lunatic fringe." * No one is likely to regard Carter as a lunatic, but he clearly takes his religion--and all religion--quite seriously. "The Culture of Disbelief" is Carter's spirited call for greater tolerance of religious diversity in what he calls "the public square," a manifesto in favor of the accommodation of religion by law and government.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yale law professor Stephen L. Carter was only 30 when he was granted tenure, one of the youngest faculty members ever to achieve that cherished badge of academic distinction. Yet Carter concedes that he was admitted to Yale Law School in the first place only because of "the color of my skin."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012
Where does reality end and fantasy begin? In the case of Abraham Lincoln, the dividing line is pretty easy to spot: Take a look at the following timeline, which draws on fact and on material from Stephen L. Carter's novel "The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln. " April 9, 1865: Robert E. Lee surrenders to U.S. Grant, ending the Civil War. Lincoln is intent on fulfilling the goal of his second inaugural address: "With malice toward none … let us strive ... to bind up the nation's wounds.
BOOKS
June 2, 2002 | STEVE WASSERMAN
And with it, comes the prospect of vacation and the promise of tackling the books we had hoped to read (but never got around to) and immersing ourselves in the titles now flooding bookstores. Why this season is considered best for reading is more a Manhattan publishers' conceit than a Southern California reader's reality. After all, the sun shines on us all year, and people read everything--fiction, nonfiction, poetry--without regard to season.
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