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Stephen L Cohen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991 | MATT LAIT
A Cowan Heights swingers' club was not a business, but rather a private organization like the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or Elks Lodge, a lawyer for the club's operator said in closing arguments Monday. "It was not a business, but a club to support a lifestyle," defense attorney William J. Kopeny said. Prosecutors disagreed, noting that the club's owner, Stephen M. Cohen, took out advertisements and collected fees from "patrons." The club, prosecutors say, was operated for a profit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991 | MATT LAIT
A Cowan Heights swingers' club was not a business, but rather a private organization like the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or Elks Lodge, a lawyer for the club's operator said in closing arguments Monday. "It was not a business, but a club to support a lifestyle," defense attorney William J. Kopeny said. Prosecutors disagreed, noting that the club's owner, Stephen M. Cohen, took out advertisements and collected fees from "patrons." The club, prosecutors say, was operated for a profit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001
Re "Doctors-in-Training: Our Last Indentured Servants," by Stephen L. Cohen, Commentary, Dec. 31: Perhaps Assn. of American Medical Colleges President Jordan J. Cohen should be forced to travel on a commercial aircraft flown by a student pilot who hasn't slept for 36 hours. He may then reconsider his theory about the training of resident physicians. GREG PURDY Palm Springs
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2000
In his July 2 Opinion piece defending continuing research on genetically engineered foods, Stephen L. Cohen wonders why there are protests and why "thoughtful dialogue is in desperately short supply." He cites two studies that may give us clues to the allegation that genetic modification in our food supply may be harmful, yet he complains that there are not enough "rational voices." Nowhere does he bring in the issue of labeling. In the past few years, chemical- and food-ingredient labeling has become more stringent, yet American consumers do not yet have the right, by law, to know whether we are eating a genetically engineered carrot stick or one of the old-fashioned variety.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2005 | E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writer
Regulators said Thursday that they had shut down a Ponzi scheme that allegedly bilked millions of dollars from religious investors who thought they would profit on coal mining and a "divinely guided" gold transaction that would yield a 100% return in 60 days. The Securities and Exchange Commission filed a lawsuit this week against the defendants. At the agency's request, U.S. District Judge Virginia A. Phillips in Riverside froze the defendants' assets pending a hearing May 13.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Former professional football player Willie Gault spent his NFL career evading opponents' defenses. Now he's facing the Securities and Exchange Commission. Gault and five other men, including Rowland Perkins, a co-founder of Creative Artists Agency, were accused by the SEC of fraudulently inflating the stock of a Studio City medical products company. The company, Heart Tronics, claimed to have received millions of dollars in orders for its Fidelity 100 heart-monitoring device but had no actual customers, according to the SEC. In its complaint filed Tuesday, the agency said Heart Tronics was secretly controlled by Mitchell J. Stein, an attorney from Hidden Hills who went to great lengths to tout the stock.
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