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Stephen Lachs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge this week declared a mistrial in a cocaine possession case for reasons that attorneys in the case say apparently had to do with his plans to attend a lawyers' convention in Toronto. The mistrial declaration by Judge Stephen Lachs means that the defendant will be set free without a jury having the chance to rule on her guilt or innocence--even though the jury had heard the entire case. Chief Deputy Dist. Atty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999
Superior Court Judge Stephen M. Lachs, who became the nation's first openly gay judge when then-Gov. Edmund D. "Jerry" Brown Jr. named him to the bench in 1979, has announced that he will retire Oct. 3. "While I'm excited about entering the world of private judgment, I can't help but reflect on the remarkable experiences I've been privileged to enjoy during my 14 years of service," said Lachs, who was a court commissioner for four years before Brown appointed him.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999
Superior Court Judge Stephen M. Lachs, who became the nation's first openly gay judge when then-Gov. Edmund D. "Jerry" Brown Jr. named him to the bench in 1979, has announced that he will retire Oct. 3. "While I'm excited about entering the world of private judgment, I can't help but reflect on the remarkable experiences I've been privileged to enjoy during my 14 years of service," said Lachs, who was a court commissioner for four years before Brown appointed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Stephen Lachs, who declared a mistrial in a drug case to attend a lawyers' convention in Toronto, said Friday that he had done so because he felt "really hemmed in and didn't know what else to do." Lachs also said in a telephone interview from Toronto that he still hopes the case can be tried again. But prosecutors reiterated that the defendant cannot be tried again because of a legal technicality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Stephen Lachs, who declared a mistrial in a drug case to attend a lawyers' convention in Toronto, said Friday that he had done so because he felt "really hemmed in and didn't know what else to do." Lachs also said in a telephone interview from Toronto that he still hopes the case can be tried again. But prosecutors reiterated that the defendant cannot be tried again because of a legal technicality.
SPORTS
May 27, 1994 | Associated Press
A judge refused to drop Detroit outfielder Eric Davis from a lawsuit filed against him and Kansas City outfielder Vince Coleman by victims of the incident at Dodger Stadium last July in which Coleman, then with the New York Mets, threw an explosive device into a crowd. Davis, then with the Dodgers, was driving the vehicle in which Coleman was riding. Superior Court Judge Stephen Lachs did not dismiss allegations that Davis had disregard for the safety of others and that he intended harm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1986
Lawyers for former heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali on Tuesday agreed to set up a trust for the 11-year-old daughter of a woman whom the fighter married in 1975 in an Islamic ceremony that has never been legally recognized. The agreement will provide between $18,000 and $20,000 a year for the support and education of Khaliah Ali and settles a paternity suit filed in Los Angeles in January, 1985, by her mother, Aaisha Ali, 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992
Your Dec. 23 editorial, "Humbug Ads About the Holocaust," contains a factual error in stating that the Institute for Historical Review is "devoted to propagating the view that the Holocaust never occurred." In a recent court case involving a Holocaust survivor who sued the institute for defamation, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Stephen Lachs admonished the plaintiff's attorneys on this very point, correcting their inaccurate representations about the institute's position on the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995
Re "Boy Scout Issue Splits State's Judges," Feb. 8: The politically correct crowd are attempting to violate the First Amendment rights of Judge John Farrell by trying to tell him who he can and cannot peacefully assemble with. In this case, the judge wishes to assemble with a law-abiding group that holds moral values that are similar to his own. The Boy Scouts of America also have the right to set standards of behavior for their members, so they can practice their First Amendment right to peacefully assemble.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1993 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Whoopi Goldberg settled a breach-of-contract lawsuit against her Friday by agreeing to star in an independent movie called "T. Rex" about a policewoman who teams up with a dinosaur. Details of the settlement, reached in the chambers of Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Stephen Lachs, were not disclosed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge this week declared a mistrial in a cocaine possession case for reasons that attorneys in the case say apparently had to do with his plans to attend a lawyers' convention in Toronto. The mistrial declaration by Judge Stephen Lachs means that the defendant will be set free without a jury having the chance to rule on her guilt or innocence--even though the jury had heard the entire case. Chief Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2006 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Michael Jackson and ex-wife Deborah Rowe, whose custody battle over their two children titillated the tabloids and prompted judicial reforms to ensure celebrities can't buy special treatment from the legal system, have reached a settlement. Lawyers for each side declined to comment on any details, including whether there had been changes to the custody agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1991
Singer Peggy Lee should get $2.3 million--not the $3.8 million her lawyers claimed she was owed--in her lawsuit against Walt Disney Co. over videocassette profits from "Lady and the Tramp," a judge ruled Tuesday. Last month, a jury awarded Lee damages against the company for selling tapes of the 1955 movie without her permission. Together, the awards totaled $3.8 million. But Tuesday, Los Angeles Superior Judge Stephen M. Lachs ruled that it was not correct to add them up.
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