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February 11, 2001 | ISAAC GUZMAN, Isaac Guzman, a staff writer for the New York Daily News, writes occasionally about pop music for Calendar
Stephen Malkmus is wedged into the bar of a trendy Manhattan restaurant, sampling soup from the appetizer menu and mulling the potential pitfalls of his first album after the breakup of Pavement, the critically adored band that made him an indie-rock icon in the '90s. His words come out in much the same way that they did in classic Pavement songs such as "Cut Your Hair," "Range Life" and "Shady Lane."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2010 | Scott Timberg
Through the decade or so the band was together, the guys in Pavement did a lot that broke from the tradition established by classic rock bands and their boomer heroes. Pavement tuned its guitars all wrong. Its members refused to make conventional sense, or to take their live shows too seriously. They avoided causes or political stands. They were neither slickly commercial nor rebelliously anti-commercial, but sort of stubbornly — or passively — oblivious. And they were fiercely anti-nostalgic, rejecting rock's usual blues or country building blocks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2010 | Scott Timberg
Through the decade or so the band was together, the guys in Pavement did a lot that broke from the tradition established by classic rock bands and their boomer heroes. Pavement tuned its guitars all wrong. Its members refused to make conventional sense, or to take their live shows too seriously. They avoided causes or political stands. They were neither slickly commercial nor rebelliously anti-commercial, but sort of stubbornly — or passively — oblivious. And they were fiercely anti-nostalgic, rejecting rock's usual blues or country building blocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2001 | ISAAC GUZMAN, Isaac Guzman, a staff writer for the New York Daily News, writes occasionally about pop music for Calendar
Stephen Malkmus is wedged into the bar of a trendy Manhattan restaurant, sampling soup from the appetizer menu and mulling the potential pitfalls of his first album after the breakup of Pavement, the critically adored band that made him an indie-rock icon in the '90s. His words come out in much the same way that they did in classic Pavement songs such as "Cut Your Hair," "Range Life" and "Shady Lane."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, Lorraine Ali writes about pop music for Calendar
You can call Pavement the Nirvana of art rock, but be prepared for the Stockton quintet to hate the title. While Nirvana introduced punk to the mainstream by fusing the abrasive genre with pop, Pavement meshes catchy melodies with experimental noise for the average kid who didn't attend art school. The group's sweet 'n' sour sound hasn't earned them millions yet, but it has made Pavement college rock's newest superstars. "We knew our music was good, but we didn't think it was way up there," says Pavement guitarist and singer Scott Kannberg, still reeling from the success of the group's 1992 debut album, "Slanted and Enchanted."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN
*** Pavement, "Terror Twilight," Matador. "Bring on the major leagues," sings Stephen Malkmus, and while that may be unrealistic for his veteran indie band, in producer Nigel Godrich's hands he shows new depth and warmth. As on Beck's "Mutations," Godrich's imaginative ornamentation favors melancholic humanism over Gen-X smugness and spurs stream-of-consciousness flow. They also open new musical dimensions--the near-epic "Platform Blues" more or less quotes Led Zeppelin's "Dancing Days."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1997 | Richard Cromelin
Seems like there's nothing but sad chords on the car radio these days, but X's 1980 lament "The Unheard Music" still carries weight in its revival by Elastica and Pavement's Stephen Malkmus. That track is joined by a serene "Odelay" outtake from Beck and other new items from Sonic Youth, Superchunk, Boss Hog and the Flaming Lips in an appropriately edgy collection for slacker specialist Richard Linklater's latest opus. * Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1996
With Guns N' Roses still planning a new album, Slash is doing music for the Quentin Tarantino-produced movie "Curdled," due in the fall. The music is said to have a Latin flavor. . . . While her debut album climbs the charts a year after its release, young singer Jewel has started work on new songs with producer Peter Collins (Indigo Girls, Bon Jovi). Release plans are not set yet.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2001
* Clorox Co. said it will eliminate 585 jobs in the U.S. and Latin America, or 5.3% of its work force, to reduce costs following a year of profit declines. The Oakland-based maker of Glad bags and Tilex cleaner as well as its namesake bleach said the reductions will save $40 million to $45 million a year starting in the fiscal year beginning in July. * Redwood City, Calif.-based Napster Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Beck made his name as a recycler, a smart, savvy searcher known for finding new value in old things. So it makes sense that the artist responsible for "Mellow Gold" and "Odelay," both high points of mid-'90s cut-and-paste pop, would eventually get around to recycling himself. That's more or less what Beck does on his latest album, "Morning Phase. " With the same downbeat acoustic vibe and many of the same players, the new record serves as a kind of spiritual sequel - a "companion piece," his camp calls it - to 2002's "Sea Change," on which the singer broke from his established collage aesthetic to offer up a dozen slow-and-low folk songs about the pain of heartache.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, Lorraine Ali writes about pop music for Calendar
You can call Pavement the Nirvana of art rock, but be prepared for the Stockton quintet to hate the title. While Nirvana introduced punk to the mainstream by fusing the abrasive genre with pop, Pavement meshes catchy melodies with experimental noise for the average kid who didn't attend art school. The group's sweet 'n' sour sound hasn't earned them millions yet, but it has made Pavement college rock's newest superstars. "We knew our music was good, but we didn't think it was way up there," says Pavement guitarist and singer Scott Kannberg, still reeling from the success of the group's 1992 debut album, "Slanted and Enchanted."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN
PAVEMENT "Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain" Matador * * * 1/2 If Kurt Cobain's strangled rasp was the voice of upstart youth in '92, and Smashing Pumpkin Billy Corgan's neurotic angel took over in '93, Stephen Malkmus' wobbly croon is a real candidate as this year's model.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | MARC WEINGARTEN
For a band that always negotiated the razor's edge between brilliance and entropy, the now-defunct Pavement left much to be desired as a live act. Leader Stephen Malkmus' songs relied on nuance and casual yet focused interplay to work properly, and the band too readily resorted to collegiate tomfoolery when things didn't pan out. What a relief, then, to see Malkmus get his groove on as a solo act.
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