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Stephen Metcalfe

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Laguna Playhouse will launch its 1994-95 subscription season in September with Stephen Metcalfe's "Strange Snow," a drama about the reunion of two Vietnam War veterans, theater officials announced Tuesday. Rounding out the five-play season at the Moulton Theatre will be a Christmas spoof ("Inspecting Carol"), a comedy about a pair of radio broadcasters ("Breakfast With Les and Bess"), an 18th-Century Italian classic ("The Liar") and a musical about men and women on the job ("Working").
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
May-September romance is the subject of Stephen Metcalfe's new "Loves & Hours." It's a phenomenon with considerable comic potential, much of which Metcalfe milks. Despite its audience friendliness, however, Metcalfe's play feels no more substantial than the romances it depicts. Approaching three hours in length, "Loves & Hours" is too long to be a souffle yet too light to be a feast.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
May-September romance is the subject of Stephen Metcalfe's new "Loves & Hours." It's a phenomenon with considerable comic potential, much of which Metcalfe milks. Despite its audience friendliness, however, Metcalfe's play feels no more substantial than the romances it depicts. Approaching three hours in length, "Loves & Hours" is too long to be a souffle yet too light to be a feast.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Laguna Playhouse will launch its 1994-95 subscription season in September with Stephen Metcalfe's "Strange Snow," a drama about the reunion of two Vietnam War veterans, theater officials announced Tuesday. Rounding out the five-play season at the Moulton Theatre will be a Christmas spoof ("Inspecting Carol"), a comedy about a pair of radio broadcasters ("Breakfast With Les and Bess"), an 18th-Century Italian classic ("The Liar") and a musical about men and women on the job ("Working").
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Where, oh where, is yuppie love, and why does it seem to elude the successful, single career woman? "Whither love?" seems to have knocked out the ever-popular "What do women want?" as a recurring barb posed to the women of the modern era. And the answer is a downer, judging from Heidi in Wendy Wasserstein's Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Heidi Chronicles." The theme is also prominent on television. Take attorney Grace Van Owen, who lost her guy to a Laker Girl on this season's "L.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1993 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As "Cheers" closes up the bar this spring at the end of the current television season, Bebe Neuwirth, the Emmy and Tony winner who plays the uptight Lilith on the hit television show, has a new role. She will star as the sultry, uninhibited Lola in the Old Globe Theatre's production of the 1955 baseball musical "Damn Yankees" during the company's six-play Festival '93. The festival, which runs from June 30-Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN DEMAC
Stephen Metcalfe's 1982 play, "Strange Snow," is enjoying its fourth San Diego run in three years. Thanks to a skilled and immensely likable production by the East County Performing Arts Center, playing through March 15, it has not worn out its welcome. It's easy to see why this show appeals to theaters from the Old Globe to the San Diego State University Theatre. It's a well-made drama about three people who have suffered and need each other if they are to fully recover.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | LEONARD KLADY
Priscilla Presley plays "Girl Friday" to detective Andrew Dice Clay in Fox's "Ford Fairlane," filming locally next month. Look for romantic sparks along with dictation in the off-beat murder mystery from director Renny Harlin and producer Joel Silver. . . . Julia Roberts is an L.A. street prostitute set up in a plush suite by a visiting business acquisitor in Touchstone's "3000," which films in June. Steven Reuther and Arnon Milchan produce the dark "Pygmalion-ish" tale written by John Lawton and Stephen Metcalfe.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
Writing about women is easy, according to playwright Stephen Metcalfe. The title character in his play "Emily," who is a stockbroker, underwent a sex change from the early drafts through a delicate but actually very simple literary operation. Metcalfe went through the script and changed all the pronouns from "he" to "she." "As I was working on it, suddenly I got to the point one day, I just said this would be so much more interesting if this was a woman," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Old Globe Sets Season: San Diego's Old Globe Theatre's summer season will include the premiere of "White Man Dancing," a new play by Old Globe veteran Stephen Metcalfe, author of "Strange Snow" and "Emily." Described by a theater spokesperson as being about the relationship between two men living in "an unfair world," it will run June 28-Aug. 19 at the Cassius Carter Centre Stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1993 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As "Cheers" closes up the bar this spring at the end of the current television season, Bebe Neuwirth, the Emmy and Tony winner who plays the uptight Lilith on the hit television show, has a new role. She will star as the sultry, uninhibited Lola in the Old Globe Theatre's production of the 1955 baseball musical "Damn Yankees" during the company's six-play Festival '93. The festival, which runs from June 30-Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Where, oh where, is yuppie love, and why does it seem to elude the successful, single career woman? "Whither love?" seems to have knocked out the ever-popular "What do women want?" as a recurring barb posed to the women of the modern era. And the answer is a downer, judging from Heidi in Wendy Wasserstein's Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Heidi Chronicles." The theme is also prominent on television. Take attorney Grace Van Owen, who lost her guy to a Laker Girl on this season's "L.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | LEONARD KLADY
Priscilla Presley plays "Girl Friday" to detective Andrew Dice Clay in Fox's "Ford Fairlane," filming locally next month. Look for romantic sparks along with dictation in the off-beat murder mystery from director Renny Harlin and producer Joel Silver. . . . Julia Roberts is an L.A. street prostitute set up in a plush suite by a visiting business acquisitor in Touchstone's "3000," which films in June. Steven Reuther and Arnon Milchan produce the dark "Pygmalion-ish" tale written by John Lawton and Stephen Metcalfe.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN DEMAC
Stephen Metcalfe's 1982 play, "Strange Snow," is enjoying its fourth San Diego run in three years. Thanks to a skilled and immensely likable production by the East County Performing Arts Center, playing through March 15, it has not worn out its welcome. It's easy to see why this show appeals to theaters from the Old Globe to the San Diego State University Theatre. It's a well-made drama about three people who have suffered and need each other if they are to fully recover.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
Writing about women is easy, according to playwright Stephen Metcalfe. The title character in his play "Emily," who is a stockbroker, underwent a sex change from the early drafts through a delicate but actually very simple literary operation. Metcalfe went through the script and changed all the pronouns from "he" to "she." "As I was working on it, suddenly I got to the point one day, I just said this would be so much more interesting if this was a woman," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2002 | Don Shirley
Ellen Burstyn will star in "The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All," a stage adaptation of the Allan Gurganus novel, opening at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego on Feb. 1. The theater's artistic director, Jack O'Brien, said a Broadway run for Martin Tahse's adaptation of the story of a Confederate captain's wife is in the works. The play is almost a solo show, but a young actor also will be on stage in a supporting capacity, O'Brien said.
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