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April 4, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a record verdict against cyber-squatting, a federal judge Tuesday awarded a San Francisco entrepreneur $65 million for the five-year hijacking of his domain name sex.com. U.S. District Judge James Ware ordered fugitive Stephen Michael Cohen and his businesses to turn over $40 million in estimated profit from Cohen's time running the pornography portal as well as $25 million in punitive damages. He also reissued a month-old warrant for Cohen's arrest for contempt of court.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a record verdict against cyber-squatting, a federal judge Tuesday awarded a San Francisco entrepreneur $65 million for the five-year hijacking of his domain name sex.com. U.S. District Judge James Ware ordered fugitive Stephen Michael Cohen and his businesses to turn over $40 million in estimated profit from Cohen's time running the pornography portal as well as $25 million in punitive damages. He also reissued a month-old warrant for Cohen's arrest for contempt of court.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Michael Cohen is one of the most successful entrepreneurs of the Internet Age, having raked in an estimated $43 million in profit from advertising fees and monthly memberships sold through the pornography site http://www.sex.com. What makes the feat more impressive is that Cohen, a multiple felon who once advertised swingers' sex parties in Orange County, made his money by swiping the Sex.com site with a forged letter to the agency that registers Internet names. Within days, U.S.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Michael Cohen is one of the most successful entrepreneurs of the Internet Age, having raked in an estimated $43 million in profit from advertising fees and monthly memberships sold through the pornography site http://www.sex.com. What makes the feat more impressive is that Cohen, a multiple felon who once advertised swingers' sex parties in Orange County, made his money by swiping the Sex.com site with a forged letter to the agency that registers Internet names. Within days, U.S.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2001 | Joseph Menn
Online porn portal Sex.com offered a $50,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of fugitive Stephen Michael Cohen, the former Orange County businessman who hijacked the lucrative Web address for five years. Cohen forged a letter to Internet registrar Network Solutions in 1995 to gain control of the domain name, then turned it into a hard-core site that was among the Web's biggest moneymakers, according to records in the long-running legal fight that followed.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2003 | Laurie Asseo, Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court refused to revive an adult-entertainment executive's bid to avoid paying $65 million to the owner of the Sex.com Web site for stealing the Internet address. The justices turned down Stephen Michael Cohen's argument that he should be allowed to appeal the order that he pay Sex.com owner Gary Kremen for acquiring the domain name through fraud. An appeals court dismissed Cohen's appeal in August on grounds that he was a "fugitive from justice."
BUSINESS
October 28, 2005 | Richard Marosi and Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writers
Four years after dodging a $65-million court judgment by fleeing the country, former online-porn mogul Stephen Michael Cohen was arrested by Mexican authorities in Tijuana and handed over Thursday to U.S. agents. Cohen, a multiple felon and longtime con man, had been on the run since before 2001, when a judge ordered him to pay a San Francisco entrepreneur for hijacking the Internet address Sex.com.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Gary Kremen won a major legal victory Friday in his long and expensive fight to be reimbursed for what may well be history's greatest theft of virtual property. Kremen had the foresight to register the domain name "sex.com" in 1994 -- and the misfortune to have it swindled away from him in 1995. All it took was a forged letter from a con man to convince Internet registrar Network Solutions Inc. that ownership had changed hands. It hadn't. And so, a three-judge panel of the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2004 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
A decade ago, in the World Wide Web's formative days, Gary Kremen registered "sex.com" with the company that keeps the rolls of the world's commercial domain names. One year later, a con man filched the rights, and Kremen set off on one of the Internet's longest-running legal battles. Now the lawsuit has been put to bed. VeriSign Inc. has agreed to settle Kremen's federal suit, the two sides said Tuesday. The Mountain View, Calif.
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