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Stephen Mosko

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Composer Stephen Mosko has gone back to a time-honored practice: writing music for people he knows. Haydn did the same for his happy band at Esterhaza Palace in Hungary. Mozart wouldn't compose a note for an aria until he had met and heard the singer. Mosko has written "Psychotropics" for five members of the Southwest Chamber Music Society. "It's fun to write for people you know," Mosko said in a recent phone interview from his home in the Santa Clarita Valley. "It's not so abstract that way."
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NEWS
April 13, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
STEPHEN "Lucky" Mosko, the CalArts composer and conductor who died in December at 58, influenced several generations of students. His music, however, isn't heard as much as it deserves. So the California EAR Unit tribute to him Tuesday at REDCAT, Valencia-based CalArts' downtown center, was particularly welcome. That's not to say that his music is easy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
There's a change of direction for the Ojai Festival this year. In the past, the annual outdoor event has built a reputation for blending lesser-known music by Bach, Beethoven and other established masters with the work of cutting edge 20th-Century personalities such as Igor Stravinsky, Pierre Boulez, Lukas Foss and Peter Maxwell Davies. Stephen Mosko, the festival's new music director, plans to maintain the cutting-edge tradition, but add a pronounced twist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Stephen "Lucky" Mosko, a composer, conductor and mentor to several generations of new music performers, has died. He was 58. Mosko died Tuesday of unknown causes at his home in Green Valley, Calif., said his wife, flutist Dorothy Stone. For more than three decades, Mosko taught at CalArts in Valencia, where he was a member of the inaugural class in 1972 and helped found the California EAR Unit, a new music group.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Josef Woodard, Josef Woodard is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Any list of prominent new music guardians in Los Angeles would have to include the man called Lucky. In 1970, Stephen "Lucky" Mosko arrived at the then-new California Institute of the Arts as a graduate student and teaching assistant, and gradually proceeded to get a grip on the reins of the contemporary music scene. He never really let go. From Ojai to San Diego, from the California EAR Unit to the Los Angeles Philharmonic, his influence has been felt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1991 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Stephen Mosko and his expert San Francisco Contemporary Music Players closed what Monday Evening Concerts called a "San Francisco in L.A." mini-festival at the Bing Theater of the Los Angeles County Art Museum Monday night. Bravely, Mosko chose to run with a program in which four of the five entries were written within the past two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Poignant, witty, articulate, crafty and economical--the music of Mel Powell seems oddly separated from its times, though its times are ours. Seen in perspective March 8, when the festival returned to the Valencia campus, six of these works, poetic and abstract at once, seem to be part of a stream, not disjunct entities.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1986 | JOHN HENKEN
A fascination with astrology is common to a number of contemporary composers. The latest Monday Evening Concert in Bing Theater at the County Museum of Art displayed some of the musical results for Karlheinz Stockhausen and Roberto Gerhard in a program called "Music for the Zodiac." Gerhard seems to have taken it fairly seriously. In the years before his death in 1970, the expatriate Catalan composed a number of works bearing the names of zodiacal signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN
The composer who names a piece "Song of Penance" is taking a real risk on some easy jokes. Tod Machover, however, would seem to have little need to make reparations for his new viola concerto, as committed before a large and eager crowd Monday at the Japan America Theatre, by the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group and soloist Kim Kashkashian. Long on energy, varied in influences and firmly directed in one sweeping movement, "Song of Penance" made a big sonic impact on its first hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
In a period when dance historians are industriously re-creating significant "lost" works, CalArts forces have made an oblique contribution with the restoration of "Ballet Mecanique," the landmark Dada film by Dudley Murphy, Fernand Leger and Man Ray, with music by George Antheil. The results of the cinematic effort, led by William Moritz, were shown for the first time Monday, as part of a Green Umbrella concert at the Japan America Theatre by the ever-intrepid New CalArts 20th-Century Players.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Josef Woodard, Josef Woodard is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Any list of prominent new music guardians in Los Angeles would have to include the man called Lucky. In 1970, Stephen "Lucky" Mosko arrived at the then-new California Institute of the Arts as a graduate student and teaching assistant, and gradually proceeded to get a grip on the reins of the contemporary music scene. He never really let go. From Ojai to San Diego, from the California EAR Unit to the Los Angeles Philharmonic, his influence has been felt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Composer Stephen Mosko has gone back to a time-honored practice: writing music for people he knows. Haydn did the same for his happy band at Esterhaza Palace in Hungary. Mozart wouldn't compose a note for an aria until he had met and heard the singer. Mosko has written "Psychotropics" for five members of the Southwest Chamber Music Society. "It's fun to write for people you know," Mosko said in a recent phone interview from his home in the Santa Clarita Valley. "It's not so abstract that way."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN
The composer who names a piece "Song of Penance" is taking a real risk on some easy jokes. Tod Machover, however, would seem to have little need to make reparations for his new viola concerto, as committed before a large and eager crowd Monday at the Japan America Theatre, by the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group and soloist Kim Kashkashian. Long on energy, varied in influences and firmly directed in one sweeping movement, "Song of Penance" made a big sonic impact on its first hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1991 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Stephen Mosko and his expert San Francisco Contemporary Music Players closed what Monday Evening Concerts called a "San Francisco in L.A." mini-festival at the Bing Theater of the Los Angeles County Art Museum Monday night. Bravely, Mosko chose to run with a program in which four of the five entries were written within the past two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
There's a change of direction for the Ojai Festival this year. In the past, the annual outdoor event has built a reputation for blending lesser-known music by Bach, Beethoven and other established masters with the work of cutting edge 20th-Century personalities such as Igor Stravinsky, Pierre Boulez, Lukas Foss and Peter Maxwell Davies. Stephen Mosko, the festival's new music director, plans to maintain the cutting-edge tradition, but add a pronounced twist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
In a period when dance historians are industriously re-creating significant "lost" works, CalArts forces have made an oblique contribution with the restoration of "Ballet Mecanique," the landmark Dada film by Dudley Murphy, Fernand Leger and Man Ray, with music by George Antheil. The results of the cinematic effort, led by William Moritz, were shown for the first time Monday, as part of a Green Umbrella concert at the Japan America Theatre by the ever-intrepid New CalArts 20th-Century Players.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
The tribal world of contemporary music has often been splintered by stylistic factionalism and personality cults. The Schoenberg Institute, however, has a project that is bringing together diverse composers, and now-- mirabile dictu-- is sharing the fruits of that project with Monday Evening Concerts at the County Museum of Art.
NEWS
April 13, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
STEPHEN "Lucky" Mosko, the CalArts composer and conductor who died in December at 58, influenced several generations of students. His music, however, isn't heard as much as it deserves. So the California EAR Unit tribute to him Tuesday at REDCAT, Valencia-based CalArts' downtown center, was particularly welcome. That's not to say that his music is easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
The tribal world of contemporary music has often been splintered by stylistic factionalism and personality cults. The Schoenberg Institute, however, has a project that is bringing together diverse composers, and now-- mirabile dictu-- is sharing the fruits of that project with Monday Evening Concerts at the County Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1986 | JOHN HENKEN
A fascination with astrology is common to a number of contemporary composers. The latest Monday Evening Concert in Bing Theater at the County Museum of Art displayed some of the musical results for Karlheinz Stockhausen and Roberto Gerhard in a program called "Music for the Zodiac." Gerhard seems to have taken it fairly seriously. In the years before his death in 1970, the expatriate Catalan composed a number of works bearing the names of zodiacal signs.
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