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Stephen Nagy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992
A Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Tuesday dismissed charges against a Maywood police sergeant who had been accused of setting fires to abandoned buildings and lumberyards throughout the city. Stephen Nagy, who was indicted in March, had been charged with five counts each of arson and attempted arson in fires that caused more than $1 million in damage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992
A Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Tuesday dismissed charges against a Maywood police sergeant who had been accused of setting fires to abandoned buildings and lumberyards throughout the city. Stephen Nagy, who was indicted in March, had been charged with five counts each of arson and attempted arson in fires that caused more than $1 million in damage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1992
A Maywood police sergeant pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges he set fire to five abandoned buildings and lumberyards in Maywood, causing $1 million in damage, authorities said. Stephen Nagy, 33, was charged with five counts of arson and five counts of attempted arson for a series of fires in Maywood between March and June, 1991, according to a grand jury indictment unsealed Tuesday. "He was trying, in a 'Dirty Harry' sort of way, to clean up the city," Deputy Dist. Atty. Jodi Rafkin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1992
A Maywood police sergeant pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges he set fire to five abandoned buildings and lumberyards in Maywood, causing $1 million in damage, authorities said. Stephen Nagy, 33, was charged with five counts of arson and five counts of attempted arson for a series of fires in Maywood between March and June, 1991, according to a grand jury indictment unsealed Tuesday. "He was trying, in a 'Dirty Harry' sort of way, to clean up the city," Deputy Dist. Atty. Jodi Rafkin said.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months ago, the government-backed Sematech chip-research consortium celebrated a milestone: it had produced leading-edge computer chips using only American-made equipment. Now that achievement is in danger of being overshadowed by an embarrassing failure, one that would present the Clinton Administration with an early and unwelcome lesson in the hazards of an activist high-tech policy.
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