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Stephen Poliakoff

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British film "Close My Eyes" (selected theaters) is about an incestuous brother-sister relationship, but it doesn't have the hearty force of a full-scale taboo-shatterer. Despite its several graphic sex scenes, the film's attitude is rather prim and decorous. It's all veddy British--the decencies may be overturned but never taste.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Century" takes us back to New Year's Eve, 1898, to a town outside London. A new resident, a Romanian Jew who made his fortune in construction in Scotland, is throwing a gaudy celebration shunned by his openly anti-Semitic neighbors. The next year, at the film's end and as the century turns, Mr. Reisner (Robert Stephens) will be considerably more successful as a host, but in the course of that year the destiny of his brilliant, handsome son Paul (Clive Owen) will have entirely changed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Century" takes us back to New Year's Eve, 1898, to a town outside London. A new resident, a Romanian Jew who made his fortune in construction in Scotland, is throwing a gaudy celebration shunned by his openly anti-Semitic neighbors. The next year, at the film's end and as the century turns, Mr. Reisner (Robert Stephens) will be considerably more successful as a host, but in the course of that year the destiny of his brilliant, handsome son Paul (Clive Owen) will have entirely changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British film "Close My Eyes" (selected theaters) is about an incestuous brother-sister relationship, but it doesn't have the hearty force of a full-scale taboo-shatterer. Despite its several graphic sex scenes, the film's attitude is rather prim and decorous. It's all veddy British--the decencies may be overturned but never taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1988
It was sickening to see North in action again, using those stage props (the uniform, etc.) so effectively, and drawing tears across the nation with his tribute to his wife Betsy. This was a good reminder that he is the protege of a professional actor. With his rhetoric of being a good soldier and his record of damaging the interest of the United States, we must raise the question: Is he trying to fool us again? LOUIS GAGNON Ventura
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
Writer-director Stephen Poliakoff suggests in provocative fashion that while some bright hopes of the 20th century were already dimming on the eve of 1900, unexpected challenges and possibilities were also opening up. A medical student of blazing promise, Paul Reisner (Clive Owen, pictured) lands at a London research institute and becomes the assistant to the institute's formidable chief, Prof. Mandry (Charles Dance).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2007 | Martin Miller and Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writers
ON a chilly winter evening, the television portion of the Golden Globes turned "Ugly" and "Grey." The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. celebrated "Ugly Betty" in the best comedy series category, and "Grey's Anatomy" won best dramatic series. It was a double victory for ABC and Touchstone, the studio that produces both shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Lost Prince," premiering Sunday on PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre," tells the largely true story of Prince John -- the epileptic, possibly autistic youngest son of George V, the reluctant king of England during World War I -- who was kept largely from public view and toward the end of his short life lived apart from his family, in a farmhouse on the fringe of their country estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Friends and Crocodiles," airing Saturday on BBC America, is the first of a brace of tangentially related TV movies written and directed by Stephen Poliakoff, who earlier made the excellent, Emmy-winning "The Lost Prince." (Its companion, "Gideon's Daughter," airs a month from now.) The film earns a few points at the top for attempting to make a drama out of subject matter unusual for a television film, the nonsexual yet almost romantic relations of people who work together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Its title promises the improbable. For a series with such a high opinion of itself, England-bred "Masterpiece Theatre" has yielded relatively few masterworks in more than two decades on PBS. Arguably the last and best came seven seasons ago with the American debut of "The Jewel in the Crown," a scintillating, 14-part rendering of Paul Scott's "The Raj Quartet" that ranks among the finest TV drama ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1988
It was sickening to see North in action again, using those stage props (the uniform, etc.) so effectively, and drawing tears across the nation with his tribute to his wife Betsy. This was a good reminder that he is the protege of a professional actor. With his rhetoric of being a good soldier and his record of damaging the interest of the United States, we must raise the question: Is he trying to fool us again? LOUIS GAGNON Ventura
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1986 | RODERICK MANN
Hundreds of feet below the city streets in some abandoned tunnels that sheltered thousands during the World War II bombings, Charles Dance is making a new thriller, "Hidden City." "It will," says first-time director Stephen Poliakoff, "show a London few people have ever seen before." That it will. Forget about Big Ben, the Tower, Westminster Abbey. Welcome to the dank, dark world where so many Londoners spent their nights back in the '40s.
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