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Stephen Prina

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April 21, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Edouard Manet (1832-83) was arguably the first Modern artist. Partly that's because the 19th century painter's work was made in direct, conscious response to museum art - in those days a newfangled institution. Before, painters and sculptors made art in response to popes, kings and burghers as well as to paintings and sculptures other artists made for popes, kings and burghers. But the museum was something new. The museum codified art and its history. Manet painted in the self-conscious hope of gaining admission to the ranks.
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April 21, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Edouard Manet (1832-83) was arguably the first Modern artist. Partly that's because the 19th century painter's work was made in direct, conscious response to museum art - in those days a newfangled institution. Before, painters and sculptors made art in response to popes, kings and burghers as well as to paintings and sculptures other artists made for popes, kings and burghers. But the museum was something new. The museum codified art and its history. Manet painted in the self-conscious hope of gaining admission to the ranks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Anyone familiar with work by artist Stephen Prina would find his home to be exactly as they'd expect: It's austere, devoid of bright colors and neat as a pin. There's nothing in his 11th-floor apartment in a Los Feliz high-rise whose presence doesn't seem to have been scrupulously considered, and he tends to arrange things on tables symmetrically. Meanwhile, at the back of his apartment lurks "the work room," whose door remains closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conceptual artist/musician Stephen Prina was once a member of various lounge bands--and if you didn't know that, it would have been easy to guess from his performance at the Schindler House Saturday night. Seated before a '70s-vintage Fender-Rhodes electric piano, Prina casually turned his high tenor pipes loose in the manner born upon a sequence of tunes from the works of Sonic Youth and Steely Dan, part of a piece naturally titled "Sonic Dan."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conceptual artist/musician Stephen Prina was once a member of various lounge bands--and if you didn't know that, it would have been easy to guess from his performance at the Schindler House Saturday night. Seated before a '70s-vintage Fender-Rhodes electric piano, Prina casually turned his high tenor pipes loose in the manner born upon a sequence of tunes from the works of Sonic Youth and Steely Dan, part of a piece naturally titled "Sonic Dan."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen Prina long has been concerned with the ways in which works of art--and art history--are "framed," so to speak, by the institutionalized value systems through which we create and shape meaning. In the past his rigorously executed, highly self-referential installations were filled with abstruse art-historical allusions and, at times, maddening formal symmetry. To some, his projects smacked of elitism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012
EVENTS SASSAS, the Society for the Activation of Social Space Through Art and Sound, will host a listening party featuring music favored by writers and artists Stephen Prina, Michael Ned Holte and Catherine Opie at the Lloyd Wright-designed home of Suzanne and David Johnson in Brentwood. Dinner and drinks will be served. Location is given upon purchase of tickets. 4 to 8 p.m. Sun. $125 per person. (323) 960-5723; http://www.sassas.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
The redoubtably named Luhring Augustine Hetzler gallery--a partnership of New York-based Luhring Augustine and Cologne-based Max Hetzler--has opened in Santa Monica with recent work by Los Angeles artist Stephen Prina. Suitably enough, one of his pieces is "Inaugural Mailing List," a boxed set of invitations to the show stuffed in postmarked envelopes and addressed from merged mailing lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1988 | GREGG WAGER
Friday night at the Ahmanson Theatre in the Museum of Contemporary Art, pianists Gaylord Mowrey and Lorna Eder performed the West Coast premiere of conceptual artist Stephen Prina's 80-minute work, "Excerpts from the 9 Symphonies of L. van Beethoven, fur zwei Pianoforte zu vier Handen, Transcription pour Piano a 2 Mains, and fur Klavier zu 4 Handen." Dividing each of Beethoven's symphonies into nine parts and juxtaposing the first part of Symphony No. 1, the second part of Symphony No.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1987 | MARLENA DONOHUE
A dubious collaboration brings together photos of the Huntington Library botanical gardens by Christopher Williams and Stephen Prina, geometric inlaid wood and resin wall works by Tim Ebner and one cibachrome photo of a Huntington garden cacti collection by John Grahm. A rambling manifesto about the show hints at everything from Jean-Luc Godard's reflections on communication to geopolitical colonialism, but the conceptual connective tissue is weak.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen Prina long has been concerned with the ways in which works of art--and art history--are "framed," so to speak, by the institutionalized value systems through which we create and shape meaning. In the past his rigorously executed, highly self-referential installations were filled with abstruse art-historical allusions and, at times, maddening formal symmetry. To some, his projects smacked of elitism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Anyone familiar with work by artist Stephen Prina would find his home to be exactly as they'd expect: It's austere, devoid of bright colors and neat as a pin. There's nothing in his 11th-floor apartment in a Los Feliz high-rise whose presence doesn't seem to have been scrupulously considered, and he tends to arrange things on tables symmetrically. Meanwhile, at the back of his apartment lurks "the work room," whose door remains closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Super-sized exhibitions are becoming more common in art museums, and the next few months will see several among the notable new shows opening around town. Chronologically, here's a selection of what's coming up in art this spring, including three really big shows: "War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath" Annenberg Space for Photography, March 23-June 2 Some war photographs are indelibly printed in America's cultural memory, such as Joe Rosenthal's carefully choreographed 1945 picture of the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima or Huynh Cong "Nick" Ut's image of a naked Vietnamese girl running from a napalm attack in 1972 (both for the Associated Press)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Lee Kaplan's clever, relentlessly analytical works take on big issues in contemporary culture. Of course, you have to know the territory--or read up on it. "The Subjects of the Artist" consists of 15 color prints of Japanese textile patterns. On each panel, silk-screened lettering spells out the yen-dollar equivalent on a particular date from 1958 (Kaplan's birth year) to 1989.
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