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Stephen Randall

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NEWS
July 18, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles has always struggled with esteem issues: "Lack of history." "Lack of literature" "Lack of distinctive skyline." Just substitute "L.A." for "dumb blond" in the joke cycle and you get the classic outsider take on left coast life--highly alluring yet ultimately vacuous.
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NEWS
July 18, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles has always struggled with esteem issues: "Lack of history." "Lack of literature" "Lack of distinctive skyline." Just substitute "L.A." for "dumb blond" in the joke cycle and you get the classic outsider take on left coast life--highly alluring yet ultimately vacuous.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Columbia Pictures Signs Deal With Cinema Line: The production and development agreement is a three-year deal. Cinema Line was founded in 1992 by clothing designer Carole Little, Carole Little co-Chairman Leonard Rabinowitz and investor Verna Harrah. The company is run by Stephen Randall, former executive vice president and head of worldwide production for TriStar Pictures.
OPINION
October 20, 2012
Re "Will Variety ink Finke?," Opinion, Oct. 14 Stephen Randall does a disservice to Daily Variety when he casts it as a cozy little house organ for Hollywood executives. During the Silverman family's ownership from 1905-87, Variety exposed the mob's attempted takeover of Hollywood by frontman Willie Bioff. Under longtime editor Thomas M. Pryor, for whom I worked for 15 years, it continued to expose shady financial dealings, payola and inflated grosses. It advocated responsibility in a business often without scruples.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1986 | DAVID FRIENDLY
The key holiday box-office season blasts off with the much anticipated launch of Paramount Pictures' "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home." As a rule, sequels tend to diminish in ticket sales, but the advance word is so strong on this picture that insiders speculate this one may outdo all its predecessors in its opening weekend. That won't be an easy task. "Star Trek III" took in a whopping $16.7 million in its first weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY
On the box office front this week, "Crocodile Dundee" continues to force the competition down under. In its third weekend "Dundee" took in $10.6 million at 1,378 theaters. The picture has grossed an astonishing $33.7 million in its first 19 days of wide release. Director Francis Coppola is back, this time delivering on time, under budget and headed for profit. In its first five days, "Peggy Sue Got Married" has grossed $7.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | KEVIN E. CULLINANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second recent make-over of an entertainment trade newspaper, the Hollywood Reporter on Wednesday published the first edition of a redesigned paper that it says reflects its evolution during the past three years. The daily Reporter has modified its type styles, layout and graphic design to include more photography and graphics and has expanded its international news coverage, said Robert J. Dowling, publisher and editor-in-chief.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1990 Oscar show is still two weeks away, but Tri-Star Pictures has already started a campaign for next year. Anticipating both hot summer competition and the short memories of Oscar voters, Tri-Star announced on Thursday that it is pushing back its release of Terry Gilliam's "The Fisher King," a comedy-drama starring Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges, from May 10 to Sept. 27.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confirming rumors that had circulated for about two weeks, the Hearst Corporation on Tuesday replaced Terry McDonell, the gruff, straight-shooting editor of Esquire magazine with Edward Kosner, editor and president of New York magazine. Hearst press releases did not explain the reasons for the shake-up, and neither D. Claeys Bahrenburg, president of Hearst Magazines, nor Alan Stiles, Esquire's publisher, would comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1985 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
Intelligence borrows but genius steals. --Hollywood maxim Movie making will forever be a business of copycats, but this summer the major studios may have cloned themselves out of another boffo box office. Consider: Within a one-week period three science-flavored youth comedies are opening: Universal's "Weird Science," (which took in $4.8 million in its first weekend at 1,158 theaters) Tri-Star's "Real Genius" and Disney's "My Science Project."
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