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Stephen Rea

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While talking about his sympathy for the goals of the Irish Republican Army, actor Stephen Rea suddenly stopped. His mournful features and sleepy brogue became briefly animated. "I'm saying really awful things aren't I?" he asked. "I'm going to get in trouble for all this. . . . "But, while I despise tribalism, I don't feel uncomfortable with the tribe." The tribe, of course, is the Irish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everything is personal in the haunting solitude of "Nothing Personal," starring Stephen Rea and Lotte Verbeek in this most unlikely of love stories. Polish writer-director Urszula Antoniak's impressive feature film debut begins and ends in near silence, broken only by distant ambient sounds. Between those bookends, the filmmaker tests the power, and the limits, of sight and sound, rather than words, to tell a story. Beautifully evocative camera work by Daniel Bouquet sets the tone as we follow Verbeek's copper-haired beauty from her start in Holland, to the green rolling sweep and rocky desolation of Ireland's Connemara region, and finally to Spain.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1996 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those who know Irish actor Stephen Rea only through his work will be surprised to learn that he does a killer Walter Matthau impression. Familiar to U.S. moviegoers for his portrayal of an IRA terrorist in Neil Jordan's acclaimed film of 1992, "The Crying Game," Rea rarely does anything frivolous on screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Dornhelm's compelling "The Break," an offbeat romantic political thriller, opens with an exciting, faultlessly staged, 20-minute escape from a Belfast prison. A weary long-term IRA convict, Dowd (Stephen Rea) is in the visitor's room telling his lover that she should give up on him when all of a sudden a fellow prisoner whispers to him that a mass breakout is about to be set in motion. "Take your time to think it over," says his friend. "You've got a minute-and-a-half."
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
While BBC veteran Les Blair's 1993 film lacks the bite of similar Mike Leigh films ("Life Is Sweet" and "Naked"), it shares with them an ability to put strongly drawn and alive folks on the screen. Beautifully acted by Stephen Rea (pictured) and Sinead Cusack, Gerry and Ellie McAllister are an amusingly realistic married-with-two-children couple. Irish born and bred and now living in the north London (Bravo Monday at 7:05 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Dornhelm's compelling "The Break," an offbeat romantic political thriller, opens with an exciting, faultlessly staged, 20-minute escape from a Belfast prison. A weary long-term IRA convict, Dowd (Stephen Rea) is in the visitor's room telling his lover that she should give up on him when all of a sudden a fellow prisoner whispers to him that a mass breakout is about to be set in motion. "Take your time to think it over," says his friend. "You've got a minute-and-a-half."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everything is personal in the haunting solitude of "Nothing Personal," starring Stephen Rea and Lotte Verbeek in this most unlikely of love stories. Polish writer-director Urszula Antoniak's impressive feature film debut begins and ends in near silence, broken only by distant ambient sounds. Between those bookends, the filmmaker tests the power, and the limits, of sight and sound, rather than words, to tell a story. Beautifully evocative camera work by Daniel Bouquet sets the tone as we follow Verbeek's copper-haired beauty from her start in Holland, to the green rolling sweep and rocky desolation of Ireland's Connemara region, and finally to Spain.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2006
British actor Bill Nighy, who plays Davy Jones in "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," will be on hand to field questions from the audience tonight at a screening of the 1998 film "Still Crazy," in which he stars with Billy Connolly and Stephen Rea as middle-aged rock musicians. The event is part of the Mods & Rockers Film Festival being presented by the American Cinematheque. It begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. Information: (323) 466-3456 or www.modsandrockers.
NEWS
February 18, 1993
Nominations for the 65th Academy Awards were announced Wednesday. For best picture, the entries are "The Crying Game," "A Few Good Men," "Howards End," "Scent of a Woman" and "Unforgiven." Here are the nominees for best actor and best actress. Stories, photos in Calendar. ROBERT DOWNEY JR.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Crying Pat: There was talk on Friday that "Saturday Night Live's" asexual character Pat (played by Julia Sweeney) will open tonight's show with a parody of the Oscar-nominated hit movie "The Crying Game," which itself is about sexual illusion. The he/she Pat was said to be rehearsing a rendition of the movie's title song as the TV cameras reveal two of the film's stars, Miranda Richardson and Stephen Rea--but a spokeswoman for "SNL" would not confirm.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
While BBC veteran Les Blair's 1993 film lacks the bite of similar Mike Leigh films ("Life Is Sweet" and "Naked"), it shares with them an ability to put strongly drawn and alive folks on the screen. Beautifully acted by Stephen Rea (pictured) and Sinead Cusack, Gerry and Ellie McAllister are an amusingly realistic married-with-two-children couple. Irish born and bred and now living in the north London (Bravo Monday at 7:05 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1996 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those who know Irish actor Stephen Rea only through his work will be surprised to learn that he does a killer Walter Matthau impression. Familiar to U.S. moviegoers for his portrayal of an IRA terrorist in Neil Jordan's acclaimed film of 1992, "The Crying Game," Rea rarely does anything frivolous on screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1993 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While talking about his sympathy for the goals of the Irish Republican Army, actor Stephen Rea suddenly stopped. His mournful features and sleepy brogue became briefly animated. "I'm saying really awful things aren't I?" he asked. "I'm going to get in trouble for all this. . . . "But, while I despise tribalism, I don't feel uncomfortable with the tribe." The tribe, of course, is the Irish.
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