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NEWS
July 22, 2002
If it's President Bush's corporate cronies who have been bingeing at the office champagne fountain ("President Appeals to Our Thirst for Metaphor," July 16), why am I the one to wake up with the hangover? STEPHEN ROSE North Hollywood
OPINION
May 9, 2003
Is anyone else as bemused as I about the plan to widen the Ventura Freeway without making any improvements to the Hollywood Freeway (May 6)? I am curious about where the proposed six lanes of morning commuters are going to go when they arrive in Studio City and slam up against the four lanes of that parking lot called the Hollywood Freeway. You can't increase flow by constricting the end of the pipeline. You will only improve it by easing the flow at the destination points. Stephen Rose North Hollywood
OPINION
April 29, 2005
Re "A Lonely Fight Against Lawlessness," April 25: Bravo to Patrick McCullough for standing up to the street punks trying to take control of his Oakland neighborhood. It's an unfortunate reality that drugs, guns, graffiti and trash are becoming an American way of life in many urban communities. Although some of McCullough's methods may have required great courage, there are other options available to the rest of us. One of the easiest, and safest, is for homeowners to actively participate in Neighborhood Watch programs and immediately call the police when they see any illegal or suspicious activity taking place in front of their homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
How many times can a best-selling author transfuse from the same blood supply? As unoriginal as haunted house stories get, "Stephen King's Rose Red" is his "Carrie" and "The Shining" meets "Ghostbusters," "Night of the Living Dead" and the Psychic Hotline. Written by the prolific King, this overwrought, overacted three-parter on ABC is campy, not scary or even stomach-turning.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1997 | From Reuters
Many Americans are working longer hours with little to show for it, a new analysis by two economists reveals. "Most Americans are not working harder so they can afford a fancier minivan," said Barry Bluestone and Stephen Rose. "They're just trying to make payments on their old car or cover the rent." "It turns out that the enormous increase in work effort over the past 20 years has allowed families to maintain their old standard of living--but almost nothing more," they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1988
If you thought a lot of Emmy Awards were handed out Sunday night--that wasn't even half of them! To keep the telecast from running hours longer, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences presented the bulk of the statuettes Saturday in non-televised ceremonies at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium. Those winners: Children's Program: "The Secret Garden," CBS. Animated Program: "A Claymation Christmas Celebration," CBS. Classical Program in the Performing Arts: "Nixon in China," PBS.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2009 | Catherine Ho
Nicknamed "the world's largest Japanese lantern" for the soft yellow glow it emanates at night, this Brian Murphy-designed house in the Hollywood Hills is the brainchild of an architect known for his edgy, offbeat creations. The effect is caused by light reflecting off the home's corrugated fiberglass shell. With views of Los Angeles from every room and an interior flooded with natural light coming through glass walls and half a dozen skylights, the Sunset Strip-area house had its current owners instantly hooked.
OPINION
February 28, 2008
The 14-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement has become a hot issue in this year's Democratic presidential campaign -- in Ohio, at least. When Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama hit the hustings in the Buckeye State, they compete to be NAFTA's biggest critic. But when they jet to Texas, which is also holding its primary Tuesday, the candidates have little or nothing to say about the pact. The disparity illustrates two truths about major trade deals: They're a magnet for pandering, and they produce both winners and losers.
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