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Stephen Rothman

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | STEPHEN ROTHMAN, Rothman is a free - lance theater and TV director who served as founder and artistic director of the revitalized Pasadena Playhouse for seven years. He is co-producer of "A Chorus Line" at the Las Palmas Theatre
The main reason for mounting a new production of "A Chorus Line" in Los Angeles was to present it in a smaller-than-usual theater--on more of the intimate scale that its creator Michael Bennett originally envisioned. But after only eight weeks, the show, which opened to many rave reviews, is set to close on Sunday. As the co-producer of this production, it's been a sad lesson in Big Squeeze economics of mid-size theater today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | STEPHEN ROTHMAN, Rothman is a free - lance theater and TV director who served as founder and artistic director of the revitalized Pasadena Playhouse for seven years. He is co-producer of "A Chorus Line" at the Las Palmas Theatre
The main reason for mounting a new production of "A Chorus Line" in Los Angeles was to present it in a smaller-than-usual theater--on more of the intimate scale that its creator Michael Bennett originally envisioned. But after only eight weeks, the show, which opened to many rave reviews, is set to close on Sunday. As the co-producer of this production, it's been a sad lesson in Big Squeeze economics of mid-size theater today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
To emphasize the '30s period look of its final production of 1987--"Room Service"--the Pasadena Playhouse will return to its '30s roots: The theater's lobby will be restyled into a hotel lobby and the ushers (from the community organization Friends of the Playhouse) will be costumed as bellhops. (Please don't tip them, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
"Mom-eeee!" That pained cry echoes throughout "Orphans," Lyle Kessler's parable of abandonment at Deaf West Theatre Company. In fact, in director Stephen Rothman's adequate if less-than-rousing new version, the cry, along with the rest of Kessler's admirably structured text, is conveyed via American Sign Language and, for non-signing patrons, is simultaneously read aloud over headsets (available free in the lobby) and translated into supertitles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
While the always-dramatic multiple personality disorder figures prominently in "The Illustrated Woman," a kind of Kentucky-fried "Sybil" at the Court Theatre, playwright Nancy Kiefer tries to broaden her focus from the extreme aberration of the affliction to its more commonly encountered causes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993
Once upon a time M.J. Anderson had a promising story idea and it must have been pitched something like this: Since Hollywood discriminates against talented women of substance, let a team of feminist screenwriters profit from the sexism by hiring a bozo male as a front. While the women write the scripts, the brain-dead male takes meetings. Call the not-so-fantastic premise "Hollywood Ever After" and stage it at the Tiffany Theatre. So far so good.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1988 | RAY LOYND
Stephen Rothman, has resigned as producing co-director of the Pasadena Playhouse, after being replaced as director of the revival of "Born Yesterday." The resignation followed a series of reported backstage battles at the theater. Allen Garfield, who joined the production last week, also left it Tuesday night after a rehearsal. His predecessor, Ron Leibman, left the show May 27. The play is scheduled to open June 26, with Rebecca De Mornay in the role Judy Holliday made famous.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
An estimated 70,000 people have been killed in Mexico's brutal drug-cartel wars over the past six years. Those costs are horrific enough. But there are also collateral damages, including a precipitous drop-off in tourism that has dented Mexico's otherwise robust economy; a chilling effect on the Mexican media, which faces constant threats, kidnappings and worse from the warring cartels; and frequent indifference or ineptitude from the country's legal...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any show that starts with strobe-lit overkill can't be all good. But John Posey's solo performance at Santa Monica Playhouse, "Father, Son & Holy Coach," survives that initial misstep and becomes a funny and absorbing chronicle of a fanatical father's attempt to rear a gridiron superstar. Posey's show is billed as "semi-autobiographical." The characters are named Sanford, not Posey, and some of the material sounds as if it were shaped to emphasize the punch line, not the absolute truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any show that starts with strobe-lit overkill can't be all good. But John Posey's solo performance at Santa Monica Playhouse, "Father, Son & Holy Coach," survives that initial misstep and becomes a funny and absorbing chronicle of a fanatical father's attempt to rear a gridiron superstar. Posey's show is billed as "semi-autobiographical." The characters are named Sanford, not Posey, and some of the material sounds as if it were shaped to emphasize the punch line, not the absolute truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | PHILIP BRANDES
After establishing itself with bold reinterpretations of such plays as "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" and " 'night, Mother" in explicitly hearing-impaired contexts, Deaf West Theatre Company has achieved sufficient acceptance and stature to tackle John Steinbeck's classic "Of Mice and Men" in sign language without alterations, much less excuses. And why not?
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