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Stephen S Trott

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NEWS
March 25, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate on Thursday confirmed Stephen S. Trott, a top Justice Department official, as a judge on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, ending a four-month hold on the nomination by two senators. The nomination, approved without debate and by voice vote, had been held up by Sens. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) and Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) since it was reported from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Dec. 3. The senators delayed action on Trott's nomination in retaliation for Atty. Gen.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2009 | Ronald D. White
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday revived a class-action lawsuit accusing Arco, Chevron and several other refiners of conspiring to fix gasoline prices during the mid-1990s. But the same panel expressed doubt that the plaintiffs would be able to prove their case. The ruling stems from a suit filed by William O. Gilley on behalf of other wholesale buyers of the cleaner-burning fuel that since 1996 has been required in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987 | TED THACKREY JR., Times Staff Writer
The White House announced Friday that President Reagan will nominate Associate U.S. Atty. Gen. Stephen S. Trott to be a judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Trott, 47, a one-time chief deputy district attorney for Los Angeles County and U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, went to Washington in 1983 as head of the Justice Department's Criminal Division. Last year, he was promoted to associate attorney general, the third-ranking post in the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1988
Stephen Trott, a top-level Justice Department official and former U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, has been sworn in as the newest judge on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Trott, who also served as a chief deputy district attorney in Los Angeles, was confirmed by the Senate on March 24 to become the 25th active judge on the circuit, which covers nine western states. Trott, 48, has for the past 18 months been associate attorney general, the No. 3 position in the Justice Department.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2009 | Ronald D. White
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday revived a class-action lawsuit accusing Arco, Chevron and several other refiners of conspiring to fix gasoline prices during the mid-1990s. But the same panel expressed doubt that the plaintiffs would be able to prove their case. The ruling stems from a suit filed by William O. Gilley on behalf of other wholesale buyers of the cleaner-burning fuel that since 1996 has been required in California.
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
A government prosecutor stung by a recent appellate court decision on Monday told a federal judge in Los Angeles that stepped-up efforts to curtail profiteering by drug traffickers would be defeated unless the government's basic law to control money laundering made individuals just as culpable as financial institutions. "Every (money laundering) conviction of the past few years (could) be gutted and rendered meaningless," Brian A. Sun, an assistant U.S. attorney, told U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1988
Stephen Trott, a top-level Justice Department official and former U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, has been sworn in as the newest judge on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Trott, who also served as a chief deputy district attorney in Los Angeles, was confirmed by the Senate on March 24 to become the 25th active judge on the circuit, which covers nine western states. Trott, 48, has for the past 18 months been associate attorney general, the No. 3 position in the Justice Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1985
President Reagan's major labor leader supporter, Jackie Presser, it has been revealed, acted "without criminal intent" in the payroll-padding scheme with alleged mob figures involving his (Presser's) Teamsters Local 507 in Cleveland. It was done with FBI permission, and Presser claims he acted as an informer to help root out the culprits and corruption. This should place him in line for a Freedom Medal, a series by Garry Trudeau, and an explanation to the media and its readers by prolific letter writer, Stephen S. Trott, chief of the Justice Department's Criminal Division, on how "we have sent a message."
MAGAZINE
August 10, 1986 | PATT MORRISON
From a cappella to habeas corpus : Stephen S. Trott, ex-Los Angeles deputy district attorney and the U.S. attorney in California's central district, has been promoted to associate attorney general, the No. 3 spot in the Justice Department. In announcing the nomination, the entertainment-conscious White House noted that among Trott's accomplishments is a gold record.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1985 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rockwell International is expected to plead guilty within the next few days to a criminal indictment alleging that the firm overcharged the Pentagon for electronics work at a factory in Texas, a Justice Department spokesman said Tuesday. The indictment could be made public as early as today. Pittsburgh-based Rockwell, the nation's second-largest defense contractor, will be charged in a 20-count indictment alleging that six employees falsified time cards at a Dallas plant in 1981 and 1982.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate on Thursday confirmed Stephen S. Trott, a top Justice Department official, as a judge on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, ending a four-month hold on the nomination by two senators. The nomination, approved without debate and by voice vote, had been held up by Sens. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) and Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) since it was reported from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Dec. 3. The senators delayed action on Trott's nomination in retaliation for Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987 | TED THACKREY JR., Times Staff Writer
The White House announced Friday that President Reagan will nominate Associate U.S. Atty. Gen. Stephen S. Trott to be a judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Trott, 47, a one-time chief deputy district attorney for Los Angeles County and U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, went to Washington in 1983 as head of the Justice Department's Criminal Division. Last year, he was promoted to associate attorney general, the third-ranking post in the department.
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
A government prosecutor stung by a recent appellate court decision on Monday told a federal judge in Los Angeles that stepped-up efforts to curtail profiteering by drug traffickers would be defeated unless the government's basic law to control money laundering made individuals just as culpable as financial institutions. "Every (money laundering) conviction of the past few years (could) be gutted and rendered meaningless," Brian A. Sun, an assistant U.S. attorney, told U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1985
Anent Assistant Atty. Gen. Stephen S. Trott's letter (May 18) claiming that "justice was done" in the E.F. Hutton fraud case, let him peddle that hokum to his boss, Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, whose sense of justice, as we recently saw, is no doubt as finely honed as Trott's. One of Trott's reasons for refusing to prosecute individuals reveals his contempt for the American public as well as his distrust of our jury system. "This scheme was so complex that most of the banks did not even realize they had been victimized," Trott wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2007 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court has ruled that a Los Angeles gang member, a legal immigrant from El Salvador who was ordered deported because of several felony convictions, is not entitled to humanitarian refugee status because of fears that he will be targeted by rivals in his home country. Jean Pierre Arteaga, who came to the U.S.
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