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Stephen Sachs

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009
It's heartening to read that South Africa is enjoying more film interest and attention from Hollywood ["Cape Town Connection," Nov. 8]. Stories of triumph and struggle from that country must be seen by the rest of the world, yet South Africa remains a deeply troubled country. The miracle of Nelson Mandela's release from prison in 1990 and the euphoria of hope when his African National Congress party was voted into office, has largely evaporated. South Africa has suffered over time through nearly two decades of government corruption and ignorance, ongoing racial tension, a soaring crime rate, devastating poverty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By David Ng
"Bakersfield Mist," the play by Stephen Sachs that was a recent sleeper hit at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles, will be making the transatlantic journey to London's West End when it opens at the Duchess Theatre this spring with a cast that includes Kathleen Turner and "Star Wars" actor Ian McDiarmid. The play is scheduled to run May 10 through Aug. 30 in London. Polly Teale will direct the play, which is about a down-on-her-luck Bakersfield woman who discovers that a painting she found may actually be a masterpiece by Jackson Pollock worth millions of dollars.  Sachs' play opened in L.A. in 2011 and ran for several months with a cast that included Jenny O'Hara as the protagonist Maude Gutman and Nick Ullett as a snobbish art expert.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By David Ng
"Bakersfield Mist," the play by Stephen Sachs that was a recent sleeper hit at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles, will be making the transatlantic journey to London's West End when it opens at the Duchess Theatre this spring with a cast that includes Kathleen Turner and "Star Wars" actor Ian McDiarmid. The play is scheduled to run May 10 through Aug. 30 in London. Polly Teale will direct the play, which is about a down-on-her-luck Bakersfield woman who discovers that a painting she found may actually be a masterpiece by Jackson Pollock worth millions of dollars.  Sachs' play opened in L.A. in 2011 and ran for several months with a cast that included Jenny O'Hara as the protagonist Maude Gutman and Nick Ullett as a snobbish art expert.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Susan Josephs, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Two years ago Stephen Sachs began working on a play about the philosophy and practice of flamenco. He figured he had all the material he needed, having spent years in close proximity to flamenco dancers as the co-artistic director of the Fountain Theatre, home of the long-running performance series "Forever Flamenco!" But after further research, he realized that the Spanish art form intertwined deeply with certain existential preoccupations that also inhabited his writer's mind. "The older I get, the more aware I have become of the loss of loved ones, the time in front of me and how I'm spending it. You start to wrestle more with these things," observes the 53-year-old playwright and director.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Smiles, waves, hugs. As they gather for rehearsal, cast and crew greet one another and launch into cheerful conversation. Some use sign language; others speak. Stephen Sachs walks among them, speaking with this group, using sign language with the next.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's impossible to appreciate the liberating exhilaration of jazz without also acknowledging the dire circumstances that spawned it. That inextricable link is laid bare in "Central Avenue," Stephen Sachs' hard-hitting new play about L.A.'s creatively fertile black music scene of the 1940s and the racist oppression and poverty that enveloped its pioneers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A night on Central Avenue in the 1940s was an experience to savor. From the Dunbar Hotel at 42nd Street, up and down the avenue, the Los Angeles street was a rich tapestry of sights and sounds. On any given night, one might have heard such sterling saxophonists as Lester Young, Dexter Gordon, Wardell Grey; jived to the song and dance of the Will Mastin Trio with Sammy Davis Jr.; or stopped in at an after-hours joint to catch a late set by the brilliant Art Tatum.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Susan Josephs, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Two years ago Stephen Sachs began working on a play about the philosophy and practice of flamenco. He figured he had all the material he needed, having spent years in close proximity to flamenco dancers as the co-artistic director of the Fountain Theatre, home of the long-running performance series "Forever Flamenco!" But after further research, he realized that the Spanish art form intertwined deeply with certain existential preoccupations that also inhabited his writer's mind. "The older I get, the more aware I have become of the loss of loved ones, the time in front of me and how I'm spending it. You start to wrestle more with these things," observes the 53-year-old playwright and director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
RACHEL is a genius. She has a MacArthur grant to prove it. She also lost her son at the supermarket -- his abduction and murder shattering her belief in the ability of the mind and her chosen field, linguistics, to control the world around her. She seeks to regain that control by attempting the impossible: teaching language to a mute young man accused of killing the father who chained him in the basement for most of his life. Then Susan barges in.
NEWS
October 4, 1985 | Associated Press
The state attorney general today cleared the way for publication of H.L. Mencken's diaries, ruling that a 1954 memorandum by the author and newspaperman does not block their release. The memorandum, which asked that only students engaged in critical or historical investigation be permitted to view the five volumes, does not have the legal effect of a will, Atty. Gen. Stephen Sachs said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009
It's heartening to read that South Africa is enjoying more film interest and attention from Hollywood ["Cape Town Connection," Nov. 8]. Stories of triumph and struggle from that country must be seen by the rest of the world, yet South Africa remains a deeply troubled country. The miracle of Nelson Mandela's release from prison in 1990 and the euphoria of hope when his African National Congress party was voted into office, has largely evaporated. South Africa has suffered over time through nearly two decades of government corruption and ignorance, ongoing racial tension, a soaring crime rate, devastating poverty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
RACHEL is a genius. She has a MacArthur grant to prove it. She also lost her son at the supermarket -- his abduction and murder shattering her belief in the ability of the mind and her chosen field, linguistics, to control the world around her. She seeks to regain that control by attempting the impossible: teaching language to a mute young man accused of killing the father who chained him in the basement for most of his life. Then Susan barges in.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A night on Central Avenue in the 1940s was an experience to savor. From the Dunbar Hotel at 42nd Street, up and down the avenue, the Los Angeles street was a rich tapestry of sights and sounds. On any given night, one might have heard such sterling saxophonists as Lester Young, Dexter Gordon, Wardell Grey; jived to the song and dance of the Will Mastin Trio with Sammy Davis Jr.; or stopped in at an after-hours joint to catch a late set by the brilliant Art Tatum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's impossible to appreciate the liberating exhilaration of jazz without also acknowledging the dire circumstances that spawned it. That inextricable link is laid bare in "Central Avenue," Stephen Sachs' hard-hitting new play about L.A.'s creatively fertile black music scene of the 1940s and the racist oppression and poverty that enveloped its pioneers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Smiles, waves, hugs. As they gather for rehearsal, cast and crew greet one another and launch into cheerful conversation. Some use sign language; others speak. Stephen Sachs walks among them, speaking with this group, using sign language with the next.
NEWS
October 23, 1986
Maryland Atty. Gen. Stephen Sachs ruled that mandatory drug testing of state employees is unconstitutional and said that civil liberties cannot be sacrificed in the war on drugs. Sachs, in an opinion for Secretary of Personnel John O'Brien, said mandatory drug testing of most state employees would violate the Fourth Amendment prohibition against unreasonable search and added there must be "probable cause" before ordering most state employees to take a urinalysis test.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1999
* "The Living"--John Ross Clark and Alison Shanks, above, are in the drama about life amid the horrors of the Black Plague in 1665 London, playing at Colony Studio Theatre through April 4. * "Mother's Day"--Stephen Sachs' new play, about a mother whose sensual past is revived when her adopted daughter brings an attractive young man home, opens Friday at Fountain Theatre.
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