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Stephen Schwartz

ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As this week wends to a close, it's likely to be one that Oscar-nominated composer-lyricist Stephen Schwartz won't soon forget. Last Sunday night he jetted into LAX from his New York base and raced to Fullerton to catch a 7:30 p.m. run-through of Fullerton Civic Light Opera's new staging of his oratorio-turned-musical, "Children of Eden," which chronicles Genesis from Adam and Eve through Noah's Ark and the Flood. It opens tonight and runs through Feb. 28.
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BOOKS
August 9, 1998 | MARTIN J. SHERWIN, Martin J. Sherwin is the Walter S. Dickson professor of history at Tufts University and author of "A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and the Origins of the Arms Race."
Two years after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Aug. 6 and Aug. 9, 1945, the British physicist P.M.S. Blackett established the fundamental relationship between nuclear weapons and the Cold War. "So we may conclude," he wrote in "Fear, War and the Bomb," "that the dropping of the atomic bombs was not so much the last military act of the second World War as the first major operation of the cold diplomatic war with Russia now in progress."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may not be quite accurate to use the "Comeback Kid" label for an artist who's had the kind of success Stephen Schwartz has had. But it's a description that the multi-talented composer-lyricist-performer fully deserves. Schwartz, who makes his first Los Angeles appearance as a singer-songwriter Friday at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall, was one of the Broadway musical theater's hottest commodities in the early '70s.
BOOKS
March 15, 1998 | KEVIN STARR, Kevin Starr is the state librarian of California. His latest book is "The Dream Endures: California Enters the 1940s" (Oxford University Press)
With the exception of a few cryptic suggestions in its epilogue, "From East to West" is not what it claims to be. It is not, that is, in its primary content and intent, an investigation into how California has shaped American culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Power to the people and oy gevalt. "Godspell," the quintessential 1970s Bible musical, is back, at the Alex Theatre in Glendale. It's back, and boy, is it dated. Stephen Schwartz wrote some big, open-hearted tunes to break up the Greatest Story Ever Told. Jesus comes to Earth to teach Bible parables, in this case, to nine urban dwellers (raising the question: Were three disciples let go?).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Some musicals fit college stages better than others. "Godspell," with its no-holds-barred attitude, is an accommodating vehicle for young, maybe raw performers looking for the chance to try things out. Stephen Schwartz's (music and lyrics) and John-Michael Tebelak's (book) retelling of the Gospel According to St. Matthew is carte blanche theater, a show where the 11th Commandment could be "Thou shalt not commit acts that are not outlandish."
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