Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen Silberstein
IN THE NEWS

Stephen Silberstein

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
October 5, 2009 | Joe Graedon; Teresa Graedon
I have suffered with "the Monster" for more than 20 years. That's what I call my excruciating headaches. It took five years to get a decent diagnosis. I'd inject [migraine treatment] Imitrex, and the pain would leave eventually. I'd rather not take Imitrex unless there is no other choice. One day, I'd had seven attacks. I called my doctor and said unless I could get help, today would be my last. I sent the same message to the Headache Clinic in Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
If you had a history of suffering from migraines and could prevent the debilitating headaches by swallowing a few pills, you'd do it - wouldn't you? Actually, odds are you wouldn't. Neurologists say that only about one-third of those who could benefit by migraine-preventing medication actually use it. Preventive treatment involves taking a seizure drug and a beta-blocker every day to reduce the frequency, severity and duration of migraines. Neurologists estimate that about 38% of people who suffer from migraines stand to benefit with such a regimen, and studies suggest that as many as half of migraines can be prevented with drugs, according to Dr. Stephen D. Silberstein, a neurologist at the Jefferson Headache Center at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.
HEALTH
July 31, 2006 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
DEBORAH KERR has spent more than 30 years battling migraines so severe that at many times in her life she's been bedridden three or four days a week, horribly nauseated and her head throbbing in pain. Newer migraine drugs eased her symptoms some, but she felt tethered to her medications. "I wouldn't leave the house even to just go grocery shopping without medicine in my purse," says the 54-year-old Bristol, Va., resident.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Embracing a tumultuous time in its history, UC Berkeley announced Wednesday that it has accepted a $3.5-million gift enshrining the Free Speech Movement that ushered in an era of student protests. The university that once arrested and kicked out movement leader Mario Savio will use the money to set up a book fund in his name, computerize its archives of student protests and build a Free Speech Movement Cafe.
HEALTH
October 8, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Philip O'Carroll was 9 years old and out playing with friends when the vision first appeared--bright filaments floating before his eyes in a shimmering sea of light. "I thought that either I was mad or touched by God," says O'Carroll, a neurologist in Newport Beach. A similar blindness struck David Kudrow for the first time when he was a teenager and visiting his grandmother. "She disappeared in front of me.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|