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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1996
Some members of INSITE (the International Network of "Somewhere in Time" Enthusiasts) have called to tell me that an impostor named Stephen Simon is claiming to have produced "SIT" (Film Clips, Oct. 27). Stephen Deutsch, they say, produced "SIT." Yes. True. That was before I changed back to my birth name of Simon from Deutsch. So Stephen Simon did produce "SIT," but he was Deutsch at the time. And he's Simon now . . . and who's on first? And to set the record even "straighter": "What Dreams May Come" is an Interscope/Metafilmics co-production for PolyGram.
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BOOKS
June 22, 2003 | Jeff Turrentine, Jeff Turrentine is an essayist and critic whose writing has appeared in Book Review, the New York Times Magazine, Architectural Digest and Slate.com.
What a strange mixture of relief and resentment must have overtaken Stephen Glass upon waking up one morning to learn he'd been supplanted by Jayson Blair of the New York Times as journalism's most accomplished young liar.
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BOOKS
December 15, 1985 | Ursula Hegi, Hegi grew up in Germany, where she studied Rilke's work. She is the author of "Intrusions" (Viking).
"When life occurs at this level of intensity, biography turns into myth," writes Stephen Mitchell in his sensitive introduction to Rainer Maria Rilke's "The Sonnets to Orpheus," an edition that includes the original German text. Rilke (1875-1926), a major German poet, perceived Orpheus as someone who let go of all desire and became totally free while--at the same time--achieving the ultimate connection to the universe.
BOOKS
August 20, 2000 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review and the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses."
It would be nice if members of the criminous classes limited their attentions to one another; if gang bangs and drive-by shootings affected no innocent bystanders and lawbreakers exterminated one another under some rule of mutually assured destruction. It doesn't work that way, worse luck.
BOOKS
June 22, 2003 | Jeff Turrentine, Jeff Turrentine is an essayist and critic whose writing has appeared in Book Review, the New York Times Magazine, Architectural Digest and Slate.com.
What a strange mixture of relief and resentment must have overtaken Stephen Glass upon waking up one morning to learn he'd been supplanted by Jayson Blair of the New York Times as journalism's most accomplished young liar.
BOOKS
November 24, 1991 | Kevin P. Phillips, Phillips, who worked for Richard Nixon in the 1968 GOP campaign, is the editor-publisher of the American Political Report
In both tenacity and perspicacity, Richard Nixon's political re-emergence over the last 14 years has proven as extraordinary as his earlier success at hauling himself back from defeat in the 1962 California gubernatorial race and going on to win the presidency (on his second try) in 1968. Historians and journalists are only just beginning to deal with the forces and circumstances involved. In "Why Americans Hate Politics," political writer E. J.
BOOKS
August 20, 2000 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review and the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses."
It would be nice if members of the criminous classes limited their attentions to one another; if gang bangs and drive-by shootings affected no innocent bystanders and lawbreakers exterminated one another under some rule of mutually assured destruction. It doesn't work that way, worse luck.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1999
Doesn't Stephen Simon ("After the Death of Gene Siskel, a Requiem for Film Criticism," March 1) realize that film criticism, by its very nature, cannot be "objective"? A critic's opinion may be based on knowledge of and love for the medium; it may biased by a personal or political agenda. Above all, however, it is based on taste. Aren't Simon's reactions to movies subjective, aren't they based on his personal taste? Do his reactions hold a perfect mirror up to those of the general public?
OPINION
April 11, 2003
Re "Make Iraqis Pay for Acts of 'Perfidy,' " by Neal Richardson and Spencer Crona, Commentary, April 8: So, Iraqis ought to pay for suicide bombings, feigning surrender and other acts of "perfidy" directed against invading U.S. and British troops, inasmuch as such acts violate international law. Such a suggestion should make Prime Minister Tony Blair and President Bush shudder. The U.S.-UK invasion of Iraq is clearly a violation of international law. It would seem, then, that one of the casualties of the war against Iraq is that neither the U.S. nor the UK is in a position to appeal to breaking international law as grounds for condemning the acts of others.
SPORTS
August 24, 2002
It is ludicrous to criticize Shaq for postponing his surgery. The Lakers have a 3 1/2-month off-season. Football players have six to seven months. Shaq takes a worse physical and emotional pounding (100 games-plus) than any football player (20-23 games). In addition, Shaq played in excruciating pain all last season. So Shaq should give up his entire vacation time to undergo immediate surgery and rehabilitation? Laker fans are blessed to have someone who is as committed as Shaq is to excellence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1996
Some members of INSITE (the International Network of "Somewhere in Time" Enthusiasts) have called to tell me that an impostor named Stephen Simon is claiming to have produced "SIT" (Film Clips, Oct. 27). Stephen Deutsch, they say, produced "SIT." Yes. True. That was before I changed back to my birth name of Simon from Deutsch. So Stephen Simon did produce "SIT," but he was Deutsch at the time. And he's Simon now . . . and who's on first? And to set the record even "straighter": "What Dreams May Come" is an Interscope/Metafilmics co-production for PolyGram.
BOOKS
November 24, 1991 | Kevin P. Phillips, Phillips, who worked for Richard Nixon in the 1968 GOP campaign, is the editor-publisher of the American Political Report
In both tenacity and perspicacity, Richard Nixon's political re-emergence over the last 14 years has proven as extraordinary as his earlier success at hauling himself back from defeat in the 1962 California gubernatorial race and going on to win the presidency (on his second try) in 1968. Historians and journalists are only just beginning to deal with the forces and circumstances involved. In "Why Americans Hate Politics," political writer E. J.
BOOKS
December 15, 1985 | Ursula Hegi, Hegi grew up in Germany, where she studied Rilke's work. She is the author of "Intrusions" (Viking).
"When life occurs at this level of intensity, biography turns into myth," writes Stephen Mitchell in his sensitive introduction to Rainer Maria Rilke's "The Sonnets to Orpheus," an edition that includes the original German text. Rilke (1875-1926), a major German poet, perceived Orpheus as someone who let go of all desire and became totally free while--at the same time--achieving the ultimate connection to the universe.
OPINION
May 27, 2008
Re "Oil chiefs scolded over gas prices, high profits," May 22 What's an oil company CEO to do? Unilaterally lower gas prices and be accused of predatory pricing to gain market share? Persuade industry leaders to lower prices and be accused of price-fixing? Or leave prices where they are and be accused by Senate leaders of price-gouging? If Exxon Mobil's senior vice president, J. Stephen Simon, donated his entire 2007 salary of $12.5 million to gas price reduction, it would lower Exxon Mobil's pump price by 0.03 cents a gallon, or less than one cent per tank.
OPINION
October 14, 2003
Re " 'Jewish State' Has Become an Anachronism," Commentary, Oct. 10: As a Jewish refugee from Iran, I read with amusement Tony Judt's opinion that the "Jewish" state is anachronistic. For thousands of years, Jews have self-described themselves as "Am-Israel," or the People of Israel, but Judt has now decided that the Jews are not entitled to their own state because of its effect on non-Jews. Perhaps he also thinks that the U.S. should not exist because it might discriminate against noncitizens.
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