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BUSINESS
March 15, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles County judge Monday scaled back a request by Walt Disney Co. to force its adversaries in the long-running Winnie the Pooh royalties case to pay the Burbank entertainment giant more than $1 million in court-related costs. In a tentative ruling, Superior Court Judge Carolyn B. Kuhl declined to grant the entire amount -- $1,083,057 -- that Disney was seeking from the heirs of Stephen Slesinger, who acquired the lucrative Pooh merchandising rights from author A.A. Milne in 1930.
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NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Meg James
Walt Disney Co. has won an appeals court ruling that protects the Burbank entertainment giant's trademarks to the valuable Winnie the Pooh characters. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington upheld a decision by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that blocked Stephen Slesinger Inc.'s challenges to Disney's control of the trademark for the Hundred Acre Wood clan. The ruling appears to end a 21-year legal odyssey against Disney by Stephen Slesinger's family.
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NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Meg James
Walt Disney Co. has won an appeals court ruling that protects the Burbank entertainment giant's trademarks to the valuable Winnie the Pooh characters. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington upheld a decision by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that blocked Stephen Slesinger Inc.'s challenges to Disney's control of the trademark for the Hundred Acre Wood clan. The ruling appears to end a 21-year legal odyssey against Disney by Stephen Slesinger's family.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2009 | Meg James
After 18 years of dueling lawsuits, courtroom clashes and allegations of impropriety, Walt Disney Co. finally can close the storybook on its battle with the family that holds lucrative rights to Winnie the Pooh. On Friday, a federal judge ruled in favor of Disney by granting the company's motion to dismiss a copyright and trademark infringement claim brought by the family of Stephen Slesinger, who was a pioneer in the commercialization of cartoon characters. In 1930, Slesinger acquired the Pooh merchandising rights from British author A.A. Milne, who created the popular children's stories.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Court declined Monday to decide whether the granddaughter of A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie the Pooh, can recapture control of the copyright for stories featuring the popular children's character. Milne wrote the Pooh books from 1924 to 1928 and granted a license to Stephen Slesinger in 1930. Slesinger, in turn, granted his rights to Stephen Slesinger Inc. The firm sublicensed certain rights to the Pooh works to Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Reuters
A Los Angeles judge Tuesday said he wanted to reconsider an independent auditor's report that Walt Disney Co. had almost fully paid for rights to the Winnie the Pooh character despite a licensor's allegations of millions of dollars in underpayments. In his tentative ruling, Superior Court Judge Ernest Hiroshige questioned the finding that Disney owed Stephen Slesinger Inc. just $11,000 in royalties stemming from a 1983 licensing agreement, Slesinger attorney Bonnie Eskenazi said.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2009 | Meg James
After 18 years of dueling lawsuits, courtroom clashes and allegations of impropriety, Walt Disney Co. finally can close the storybook on its battle with the family that holds lucrative rights to Winnie the Pooh. On Friday, a federal judge ruled in favor of Disney by granting the company's motion to dismiss a copyright and trademark infringement claim brought by the family of Stephen Slesinger, who was a pioneer in the commercialization of cartoon characters. In 1930, Slesinger acquired the Pooh merchandising rights from British author A.A. Milne, who created the popular children's stories.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2004 | From Reuters
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who threw out a 13-year-old suit over Winnie the Pooh royalties against Walt Disney Co. refused Monday to step down from the case or admit bias. Another judge must review the motion by Stephen Slesinger Inc., which two weeks ago argued that Judge Charles W. McCoy favored Disney and should step down from the case. Such a move would have vacated the pro-Disney ruling he made March 29. Slesinger claims Disney shortchanged it on U.S.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co. received permission from a federal judge to appeal a decision that said the granddaughter of Winnie the Pooh author A.A. Milne can't reclaim U.S. rights to the character. In May, U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper in Los Angeles ruled that Clare Milne couldn't use a change in U.S. copyright law to reclaim rights to Winnie the Pooh next year. Cooper's order on Tuesday lets Disney and Milne ask the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2003 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
The granddaughter of Winnie the Pooh's creator should be able to reclaim U.S. merchandising rights to the beloved children's book character, Walt Disney Co. argued Monday in federal court in Los Angeles. The Burbank-based entertainment giant is hoping to persuade U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper to reverse her tentative ruling against Clare Milne, one that could cost the company millions in royalties and merchandising rights. The judge indicated that she plans to rule by the end of the week.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Court declined Monday to decide whether the granddaughter of A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie the Pooh, can recapture control of the copyright for stories featuring the popular children's character. Milne wrote the Pooh books from 1924 to 1928 and granted a license to Stephen Slesinger in 1930. Slesinger, in turn, granted his rights to Stephen Slesinger Inc. The firm sublicensed certain rights to the Pooh works to Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles County judge Monday scaled back a request by Walt Disney Co. to force its adversaries in the long-running Winnie the Pooh royalties case to pay the Burbank entertainment giant more than $1 million in court-related costs. In a tentative ruling, Superior Court Judge Carolyn B. Kuhl declined to grant the entire amount -- $1,083,057 -- that Disney was seeking from the heirs of Stephen Slesinger, who acquired the lucrative Pooh merchandising rights from author A.A. Milne in 1930.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Nearly a year after winning a hard-fought battle over Winnie the Pooh royalties, Walt Disney Co. wants its longtime adversaries to pay more than $1 million in court-related costs that the Burbank-based entertainment giant incurred to prepare and present its case.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2004 | From Reuters
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who threw out a 13-year-old suit over Winnie the Pooh royalties against Walt Disney Co. refused Monday to step down from the case or admit bias. Another judge must review the motion by Stephen Slesinger Inc., which two weeks ago argued that Judge Charles W. McCoy favored Disney and should step down from the case. Such a move would have vacated the pro-Disney ruling he made March 29. Slesinger claims Disney shortchanged it on U.S.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2004 | From Reuters
The family suing Walt Disney Co. over merchandising royalties to Winnie the Pooh has asked the Los Angeles court that threw out the 13-year-old suit to grant a new trial. The motion by the heirs of Stephen Slesinger -- who hold the merchandising rights to the honey-loving bear -- responds to Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Charles W. McCoy's March 29 ruling that the family was guilty of misconduct and stealing evidence.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co. received permission from a federal judge to appeal a decision that said the granddaughter of Winnie the Pooh author A.A. Milne can't reclaim U.S. rights to the character. In May, U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper in Los Angeles ruled that Clare Milne couldn't use a change in U.S. copyright law to reclaim rights to Winnie the Pooh next year. Cooper's order on Tuesday lets Disney and Milne ask the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2004 | From Reuters
The family suing Walt Disney Co. over merchandising royalties to Winnie the Pooh has asked the Los Angeles court that threw out the 13-year-old suit to grant a new trial. The motion by the heirs of Stephen Slesinger -- who hold the merchandising rights to the honey-loving bear -- responds to Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Charles W. McCoy's March 29 ruling that the family was guilty of misconduct and stealing evidence.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
The judge overseeing the 12-year-old feud over Winnie the Pooh royalties has removed himself from the case, becoming the latest major participant to bow out of the bitter dispute between Walt Disney Co. and the family who inherited the merchandising rights for the cuddly bear.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
The judge overseeing the 12-year-old feud over Winnie the Pooh royalties has removed himself from the case, becoming the latest major participant to bow out of the bitter dispute between Walt Disney Co. and the family who inherited the merchandising rights for the cuddly bear.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2003 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
The granddaughter of Winnie the Pooh's creator should be able to reclaim U.S. merchandising rights to the beloved children's book character, Walt Disney Co. argued Monday in federal court in Los Angeles. The Burbank-based entertainment giant is hoping to persuade U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper to reverse her tentative ruling against Clare Milne, one that could cost the company millions in royalties and merchandising rights. The judge indicated that she plans to rule by the end of the week.
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