Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen Sondheim
IN THE NEWS

Stephen Sondheim

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
Theater is a notoriously ephemeral art, but the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is using its website to summon the decade-old glories of the 2002 "Sondheim Celebration," which closed 10 years ago this month. "The Sondheim Celebration: Ten Years Later" web page , which went up this week, is a retrospective of a retrospective that saw six of Stephen Sondheim's musicals staged in repertory over four months. The web page includes a new six-minute video in which Eric Schaeffer, the festival's artistic director, looks back along with cast members including Douglas Sills, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Christine Baranski, Melissa Errico, Michael Cerveris and Alice Ripley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt
Controversy of one kind or another has dogged "Porgy and Bess" since its Broadway premiere in 1935. Just the fact that George Gershwin's first real stab at grand opera debuted on Broadway rather than the Metropolitan Opera, which had initially commissioned the work, encapsulates two of the work's main fault lines: the debate over whether it's a musical or an opera or something in between, and the matter of its African American cast, which necessitated...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Stately and rumpled, Stephen Sondheim descended from an upper floor of his elegant East Side townhouse and submitted to the interview as though it were a necessary barber shop shave. He's used to these intrusions ? the artist obliged to natter on about his work was one of the themes of "Sunday in the Park With George" ? but this year the distractions have gone to a harrying new extreme. Sondheim turned 80 in March, and he's been blowing out the candles ever since. There was an all-star birthday concert at Lincoln Center (scheduled to air on PBS on Nov. 24)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Susan King
Kathie Lee Gifford looked like a deer caught in oncoming headlights when 89-year-old Broadway legend Elaine Stritch casually dropped an F-bomb on the "Today" show a few weeks back. Gifford shouldn't have been surprised. Stritch, who appeared on the morning show to chat about the documentary "Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me," which opens in L.A. on Friday, has been a lively and outspoken force of nature throughout a career that has spanned more than 60 years. And she was equally unfiltered in a recent phone conversation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By David C. Nichols, Special to the Los Angeles Times
  The artistic sagacity of Stephen Sondheim met the personal veracity of Elaine Stritch on Saturday, when "Elaine Stritch Singin' Sondheim … One Song at a Time" strode into Walt Disney Concert Hall, leaving venue and audience ineffably transformed. In her Disney Hall debut, Stritch and this acclaimed 2010 Café Carlyle salute to the master of American musical theater didn't so much seize the house as subsume its regard and send it back tenfold. Visibly charged by the capacity crowd's ovation, Stritch opened with "I Feel Pretty," weaving her sandpaper Sprechstimme around Sondheim's lyrics to wryly irresistible, post-Noel Coward effect.
NEWS
November 28, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Finishing the Hat Collected Lyrics (1954-1981) With Attendant Comments, Principles, Heresies, Grudges, Whines and Anecdotes Stephen Sondheim Alfred A. Knopf: 480 pp., $39.95. The essential qualities of Stephen Sondheim's artistic temperament ? the peppery precision, the refusal to traffic in received wisdom and the commitment to truth over sentimentality ? help turn what could have been a perfunctory curatorial service into the most valuable theater book of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1997
After more than 20 years of producing theater in Los Angeles, I have learned to appreciate good reviews, swallow bad ones and just move on. However, as The Times is the paper of record, I cannot allow a recent Laurie Winer review (" 'Putting It Together' Reworks Sondheim," Jan. 28) to stand without comment. Winer says the show "owes its existence to people who cannot get enough of the maestro and who delight in any excuse to listen to his songs." Is she aware of how incredibly insulting that is to Stephen Sondheim and Cameron Mackintosh?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2003 | Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune
"Oy, oy, oy," kvetches Stephen Sondheim, the iconic composer whose name launched a thousand books and journals, and whose personal approval is more valuable and sought after in theatrical circles than the highest-priced therapist in Manhattan.
BOOKS
February 14, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is the Times theater writer
Stephen Sondheim's musical theater scores frequently express amusing ambivalence, often move on to rueful regret and sometimes explode in caustic anger. The listener is tempted to speculate about the personal sources of all that irony and melancholy. Enter Meryle Secrest, probing gently but firmly into the artist's personality as well as his work in her biography, "Stephen Sondheim: A Life."
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1962, a young lyricist with an already impressive series of collaborations under his belt got his first shot at writing both the lyrics and music for a Broadway musical--a gaudy, bawdy farce with an ingeniously twisted plot that lit up the Great White Way with its frenetic Roman Scandals. The composer was Stephen Sondheim, the show was "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," and the rest is history.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
Theater is a notoriously ephemeral art, but the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is using its website to summon the decade-old glories of the 2002 "Sondheim Celebration," which closed 10 years ago this month. "The Sondheim Celebration: Ten Years Later" web page , which went up this week, is a retrospective of a retrospective that saw six of Stephen Sondheim's musicals staged in repertory over four months. The web page includes a new six-minute video in which Eric Schaeffer, the festival's artistic director, looks back along with cast members including Douglas Sills, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Christine Baranski, Melissa Errico, Michael Cerveris and Alice Ripley.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's not just the exposure to countless editions of “West Side Story” that causes us to stagger dazed and elated from the Chance Theater. Less a revival than a whole-scale reinvention, this stunning chamber version of the landmark 1957 musical by Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents yields breathtaking, deeply moving results. Dispensing with the original iconography of Jerome Robbins' epochal staging, director Oanh Nguyen and choreographer Kelly Todd concoct an elemental, viscerally charged production that nonetheless honors the property's “Romeo and Juliet” source.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By David C. Nichols, Special to the Los Angeles Times
  The artistic sagacity of Stephen Sondheim met the personal veracity of Elaine Stritch on Saturday, when "Elaine Stritch Singin' Sondheim … One Song at a Time" strode into Walt Disney Concert Hall, leaving venue and audience ineffably transformed. In her Disney Hall debut, Stritch and this acclaimed 2010 Café Carlyle salute to the master of American musical theater didn't so much seize the house as subsume its regard and send it back tenfold. Visibly charged by the capacity crowd's ovation, Stritch opened with "I Feel Pretty," weaving her sandpaper Sprechstimme around Sondheim's lyrics to wryly irresistible, post-Noel Coward effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
There's so much to praise in the blissful Broadway revival of "Follies," which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre on the heels of its numerous Tony nominations, but let's pay homage first to the sheer sophistication of the show itself. After experiencing "Follies" again - an adult entertainment if ever there was one - I flat-out refuse to accept any more jukebox substitutes. One doesn't often talk about architecture when writing about musicals, but the most impressive thing about "Follies," beyond Stephen Sondheim's bejeweled score, is the ingenious way it is constructed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Diane Haithman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Though the 1971 Stephen Sondheim-James Goldman musical "Follies" puts male-female relationships under a microscope with its probing exploration of unhappy showbiz marriages and broken dreams, most would agree that this show belongs to the women. "If you think of all the specialty numbers throughout, it really is female-oriented," says Eric Schaeffer, director of the Broadway production opening Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, which was nominated last week for eight Tony Awards, including revival of a musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | Ed Stockly
"Open Call" 9 p.m. Thursday, KCET: 100 Voices: A Journey Home: Hosted by mezzo-soprano opera singer Suzanna Guzman, "Open Call" features a wide variety of productions from profiles of artists. "Soulful Symphony With Darin Atwater: Song in a Strange Land" 11:30 a.m. Friday; Noon Wednesday, KCET: Artistic director Atwater conducts an 85-member orchestra in compositions exhibiting styles ranging through gospel, jazz and symphonic music. "Il Volo Takes Flight" Noon Friday, KOCE: The Italian teen vocal group performs classical and traditional Italian songs at the Detroit Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Sondheim's new musical "Assassins," about nine killers or would-be killers of American Presidents, is a misfire in the opinion of most reviews that appeared Monday. The 90-minute, eight-song revue, which has been previewing Off Broadway at Playwrights Horizons, opened Sunday night. It is Sondheim's first musical since his moderately successful "Into the Woods," which was loosely based on fairy tales.
NEWS
November 28, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Finishing the Hat Collected Lyrics (1954-1981) With Attendant Comments, Principles, Heresies, Grudges, Whines and Anecdotes Stephen Sondheim Alfred A. Knopf: 480 pp., $39.95. The essential qualities of Stephen Sondheim's artistic temperament ? the peppery precision, the refusal to traffic in received wisdom and the commitment to truth over sentimentality ? help turn what could have been a perfunctory curatorial service into the most valuable theater book of the year.
IMAGE
November 14, 2010 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Supporters of the ASCAP Foundation paid tribute to Stephen Sondheim at an intimate Nov. 7 gathering at the Beverly Hills home of Marilyn and Alan Bergman, the Academy Award-winning lyricists for such classic songs as "The Way We Were" and "The Windmills of Your Mind. " "In a town where the world 'genius' is bandied about so easily, it is truly an honor to stand in the presence of an actual genius," said "Desperate Housewives" producer Marc Cherry, glancing toward Sondheim, as he chatted with guests.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|