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Stephen Sprouse

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2004 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Sprouse, fashion designer, artist and photographer who brought a counterculture style to a wider American audience, died Thursday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City of heart failure. He was 50 and had been diagnosed with lung cancer a year ago, according to his mother, Joanne Sprouse. He was a critical darling when he burst onto the scene with his spare, colorful designs in the early 1980s. But Sprouse's business acumen never matched his creativity.
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IMAGE
January 4, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
Like a greatest hits album, the Stephen Sprouse for Louis Vuitton collection is back, arriving in stores Friday, nine years after the artist's original Monogram Graffiti purses became ironic icons by "defacing" the Louis Vuitton logo for the first time. Only now, in addition to using graffiti, Louis Vuitton creative director Marc Jacobs updated the look by splashing Sprouse's roses on monogram wallets, handbags and scarves to spectacular effect.
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NEWS
May 4, 1995 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a love fest going on between fashion designer Stephen Sprouse and the family that owns Barneys New York. "They're great to work with," he says of the Pressman family. "My family likes him very much. He's a super guy without a big ego," senior buyer Nancy Pressman says of Sprouse. Here's the deal: Barneys gets the exclusive services of one of New York's most creative designers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2004 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Sprouse, fashion designer, artist and photographer who brought a counterculture style to a wider American audience, died Thursday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City of heart failure. He was 50 and had been diagnosed with lung cancer a year ago, according to his mother, Joanne Sprouse. He was a critical darling when he burst onto the scene with his spare, colorful designs in the early 1980s. But Sprouse's business acumen never matched his creativity.
IMAGE
January 4, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
Like a greatest hits album, the Stephen Sprouse for Louis Vuitton collection is back, arriving in stores Friday, nine years after the artist's original Monogram Graffiti purses became ironic icons by "defacing" the Louis Vuitton logo for the first time. Only now, in addition to using graffiti, Louis Vuitton creative director Marc Jacobs updated the look by splashing Sprouse's roses on monogram wallets, handbags and scarves to spectacular effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
With his typically amped-up runway sets pared down to nothing more than a trailing spotlight, Marc Jacobs showed an exuberant fall collection Monday that reveled in the art of getting dressed. A riot of Crayola box colors and 1980s references, the show was the jolt the foundering fashion industry needed, proving that the ostentatious furs and jeweled heels of yesteryear may be gone, but luxury lives on in a purer form through energetic cut and color.
IMAGE
May 24, 2009 | Melissa Magsaysay
Summer's shocking color palette isn't for the timid. Flashes of neon are adding a sporty feel to warm-weather dressing that's a throwback to the roots of Southern California beachwear. Think Body Glove (see Page 7), Camp Beverly Hills and Sarah Jessica Parker's SanDeE* character in "L.A. Story." How could we not do this shoot at Venice Beach? British designer Christopher Kane was onto the trend a couple of years ago when he showed tube dresses in highlighter shades.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | DEBRA GENDEL, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
When we finally got a look at the long-awaited "Ready to Wear (Pret-a-Porter)" Tuesday night we found the fashion less impressive than all the bodies on display. And we're not talking about Robert Altman's much-publicized naked fashion show. (If you've seen one skinny naked runway model, you've seen them all.) Far more fascinating was the sight of Tracey Ullman in a black G-string (a little cellulite on the buns, but a nice flat stomach). Sally Kellerman baring her surprisingly girlish breasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2004 | Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
The world is a beautiful place when everything is seen through the lens of celebrity, and that's the world that InStyle magazine has brought to its readers every month for the last 10 years. When InStyle launched, supermodels ruled the fashion magazines and Martians the supermarket tabloids. But with a current circulation of 1.7 million, the magazine that featured Barbra Streisand on its first cover helped fuel the celebrity craze if not copycat publications.
IMAGE
March 8, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
Heavy metal studs, leather leggings, safety pins and sequins, oversized sweaters and boyfriend jackets, power shoulders and flashes of neon. During the shows at Milan Fashion Week, it wasn't a question of whether the 1980s would be referenced, but which part of the 1980s.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a love fest going on between fashion designer Stephen Sprouse and the family that owns Barneys New York. "They're great to work with," he says of the Pressman family. "My family likes him very much. He's a super guy without a big ego," senior buyer Nancy Pressman says of Sprouse. Here's the deal: Barneys gets the exclusive services of one of New York's most creative designers.
HOME & GARDEN
March 18, 2004 | Adamo DiGregorio and David A. Keeps, Special to The Times
Like hip-hop and Madonna, graffiti would never last, they said. They were wrong. Spray paint, doodles and block lettering have become part of the vocabulary of contemporary art, from paintings at L.A. galleries such as New Image Art to the logo of Burbank's Urban Outfitters. These vibrant graphics are also making their way from public places to private spaces.
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