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Stephen T Hearst

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001
I am surprised that Cynthia Berryman (letter, Aug. 5) expects her experience at the Getty Center to be replicated at Hearst Castle. As elegant as it truly is, the Getty Center is the classic art museum, with objets d'art mounted on walls or in enclosures that the visitor cannot touch, many guards discreetly standing around and a layout that enhances crowd management. The Hearst Castle was originally a very elegant private residence. The many significant elements in the rooms need to have their vulnerability to the casual visitor carefully controlled so that future visitors can experience the environment that William Randolph Hearst created.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The state Friday closed a $95-million deal that preserves a scenic stretch of California's Central Coast and permanently bars development on much of the historic Hearst Ranch. "The dramatic nature of this agreement is exceeded only by the vision for the state's future and the value for the people that it will provide," Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said in a statement announcing the closing of escrow. "This magnificent property will forever be preserved."
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | SALLY ANN CONNELL and JOHN JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hearst Corp. formally unveiled its new, more conciliatory plan Thursday to build a long-stalled resort along a windswept stretch of the Central Coast--a plan that immediately drew a familiar chorus of skepticism. "The Hearst project is really unchanged from what it has always been," said Doug Buckmaster, a spokesman for Friends of the Ranchland. "What's changed is the tack they are taking. It's smoother."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hearst Corp. has agreed to postpone any development of its historic ranch in San Simeon for six months to allow two national conservation groups to come up with a plan to preserve the property forever. Hearst picked the Nature Conservancy and the Conservation Fund as its "conservation partners." These groups will try to raise public and private money for a deal that would set aside most, if not all, of the picturesque property from development. "It's a great opportunity," said Stephen T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
The demise of the Hearst newspaper empire in Los Angeles began in 1962 when publisher George Randolph Hearst Jr. abandoned the morning newspaper market. Hearst and the company that owned the Los Angeles Times made what some viewed as a back-room deal: At almost the same time, they folded editions that directly competed with each other. A sister paper of The Times, the afternoon daily Mirror, stopped publishing while the Hearst Corp. "merged" the morning Examiner with the afternoon Herald-Express.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over Republican complaints that they were being rushed, an Assembly committee passed legislation Wednesday designed to close a legal loophole that speculators have used to make millions by threatening to build on some of California's most treasured coastal lands. The 8-2 vote by the Local Government Committee will send the bill to the Assembly floor as early as Friday, where it could face determined opposition from real estate interests, including representatives of the Hearst family.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawmakers launched an eleventh-hour attempt Tuesday to thwart Hearst Corp. from subdividing some of California's most renowned coastal property as a prelude to opening it up to extensive development. Proponents of the bill hope it will not only protect the sweeping tablelands below Hearst Castle on the Central Coast but also curb an increasingly popular tactic of using historic property records to circumvent zoning restrictions and increase land values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2004 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
Over strong objections from some environmentalists, a state board on Thursday agreed to provide $34.5 million to help preserve the Hearst Ranch, a major stretch of undeveloped coastline in Central California. The unanimous vote by the three-member Wildlife Conservation Board is the second of four steps in cementing a controversial deal totaling $95 million that opponents call too generous to owner Hearst Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2002 | John Johnson, Times Staff Writer
More than a year's worth of talks aimed at preserving the vast Hearst Ranch along California's scenic Central Coast have broken down, even as negotiators were finalizing the details of what would have been a landmark settlement. But Hearst Corp. officials said Monday that they have entered talks with another environmental partner and fully expect the new negotiations to succeed. "I remain confident that we will be able to preserve the beauty of the ranch forever," said Stephen T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The state Coastal Conservancy on Wednesday agreed to contribute $34.5 million toward preserving the Hearst Ranch as open space, but altered the deal slightly to require more public access along the ranch's 18 miles of beaches, grassy bluff tops and rocky headlands. The Coastal Conservancy, which has a legal mandate to maximize public beach access, insisted that the Hearst Corp.
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