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Stephen Toulmin

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August 19, 2001 | ANTHONY GOTTLIEB, Anthony Gottlieb is executive editor of The Economist and the author of "The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy From the Greeks to the Renaissance."
Stephen Toulmin has been thinking and writing about rationality for half a century. First trained as a scientist, he returned from World War II to study philosophy under Wittgenstein in Cambridge. His doctoral thesis (published in 1950 as "An Examination of the Place of Reason in Ethics") looked at the similarities and differences between rational argument in science and morals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Stephen E. Toulmin, a British-born philosopher and retired USC professor who created a model for evaluating the practical arguments that arise from daily life during a six-decade career that brought him prominence in several fields, has died. He was 87. Toulmin, who was the Henry R. Luce professor at the Center for Multiethnic and Transnational Studies, died Dec. 4 at USC University Hospital, said his son, Greg. The cause was pneumonia. The Oxford-trained theorist was best known for “The Uses of Argument,” published in 1958 and still in print, which set forth six criteria for building an effective argument.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aside from the dozen scholarly tomes he's written, another thing brings USC professor Stephen Toulmin distinction in academia: where he lives. In a dorm. At age 74. What's more, the British-born philosopher and historian has a dining hall set aside one evening a week so he and fellow dorm residents can dine and chat in the intimate style of his days at Cambridge. It's not all highbrow talk over the spinach linguine. At the last dinner, he stood up to announce an upcoming whale watching trip.
NEWS
August 19, 2001 | BRUCE OLSON, REUTERS
In the morning, Armin Lehmann gets out of bed and uses two crutches to make his way to the bathtub, where he soaks in scalding water so he can walk. In this way he's not unique, for he's an aging veteran who still suffers from wounds received in World War II. But in another way, this 73-year-old retired travel executive is far different from other veterans. For Armin Lehmann spent the last 10 days of the war in a bunker with Adolf Hitler, Eva Braun, Joseph Goebbels, Martin Bormann and the dozens of other Nazis during the Battle of Berlin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Stephen E. Toulmin, a British-born philosopher and retired USC professor who created a model for evaluating the practical arguments that arise from daily life during a six-decade career that brought him prominence in several fields, has died. He was 87. Toulmin, who was the Henry R. Luce professor at the Center for Multiethnic and Transnational Studies, died Dec. 4 at USC University Hospital, said his son, Greg. The cause was pneumonia. The Oxford-trained theorist was best known for “The Uses of Argument,” published in 1958 and still in print, which set forth six criteria for building an effective argument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE
Stephen Toulmin, a professor at the University of California, will be a guest lecturer at Cal Lutheran University on Nov. 3. Toulmin, a native of England who studied physics and philosophy at Cambridge University, suggests modern-day scientists reevaluate classic physics as set by Sir Isaac Newton. He will advance his theories in two lectures, "Alternative Visions of Theory in the Human Sciences" at 10 a.m. and "Economic and Social Practice in its Cultural Situation" at 8 p.m.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Amgen has renewed its $10,000 gift to Cal Lutheran University to help fund the annual Harold Stoner Clark Lecture Series for the next two years. Amgen, a biotechnology company based in Thousand Oaks, joined the university as a co-sponsor in 1995 due to the scientific theme of the annual lecture series. The 1997 lectures, scheduled for Nov. 3, will feature Dr. Stephen E. Toulmin, a USC philosophy professor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With four of its August pledge nights eclipsed by the political conventions, KCET-TV Channel 28 returns Sunday and Monday nights with some rather unusual fund-raising fare. Instead of the traditional sort of upbeat, entertaining pledge programming designed to engage the viewer and enhance membership, KCET is presenting "A Glorious Accident," which it describes as "part adventurous scientific exploration, part mind-opening philosophical sojourn."
OPINION
July 3, 1988
For most of the history of Western civilization, philosophy was, if not vital, at least relevant, and usually more than that. From the first philosopher, Thales, who lived in the 6th Century B.C., until the 19th Century, philosophers asked important questions about the nature of reality and the role of people in the world. But in the 20th Century many academic philosophers somehow got off the track--at least in the English-speaking world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three new movies premiere this Sunday, including a poignant drama directed by Peter Bogdanovich and a remake of a classic film with a star-studded cast directed by William Friedkin. The Bogdanovich film is CBS' "The Price of Heaven," airing at 9 p.m. on Channel 2. Grant Show and Cicely Tyson star in the story of a good-hearted young man who learns the value of love and compassion from an unlikely friend. Friedkin's remake is "12 Angry Men," at 9 p.m. on Showtime. Jack Lemmon and George C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aside from the dozen scholarly tomes he's written, another thing brings USC professor Stephen Toulmin distinction in academia: where he lives. In a dorm. At age 74. What's more, the British-born philosopher and historian has a dining hall set aside one evening a week so he and fellow dorm residents can dine and chat in the intimate style of his days at Cambridge. It's not all highbrow talk over the spinach linguine. At the last dinner, he stood up to announce an upcoming whale watching trip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | JOHN DART
More than 700 U.S. ministers, practitioners and lay leaders of the United Church of Religious Science will attend the annual convention of the Los Angeles-based denomination next week at the Sheraton Universal Hotel. Religious Science churches, which teach a metaphysical philosophy and emphasize a positive outlook, grew out of the Science of Mind movement founded in 1927 by Ernest Holmes. Addressing the opening convention session at 7 p.m. Wednesday will be the Rev.
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