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Stephen Townsend

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NEWS
September 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Eight track and cross-country runners from the University of Wyoming were killed early Sunday when their sport utility vehicle collided head-on with a pickup truck that had apparently swerved into their lane. Wyoming Highway Patrol Sgt. Stephen Townsend said the SUV carrying the athletes collided with a 1-ton pickup truck at 1:30 a.m. Sunday about 17 miles south of Laramie. All seven passengers of the SUV were ejected, and they and the driver died at the scene.
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NEWS
February 17, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Like one of the characters who fills the pages of his new comic book series, artist Stephen Townsend finds his life taking unexpectedly dramatic turns. Struggling last May to publish the first issue of his South Central Comics series, the 23-year-old Crenshaw native and UCLA graduate is now distributing a second issue illustrated by a new partner, has a literary agent, and is speaking with show business types about developing his comic book into a film or television production.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Until last year, Stephen Townsend said he was just another urban dweller for whom violent crime was deplorable, but an abstraction; it was something that happened to other, less fortunate people. But after two high school friends were slain, Townsend decided it was time to fight back. His weapon of choice: a comic book series featuring an ordinary-Joe-turned-crimefighter named The Hood.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Until last year, Stephen Townsend said he was just another urban dweller for whom violent crime was deplorable, but an abstraction; it was something that happened to other, less fortunate people. But after two high school friends were slain, Townsend decided it was time to fight back. His weapon of choice: a comic book series featuring an ordinary-Joe-turned-crimefighter named The Hood.
WORLD
June 26, 2007 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
For more than a year, hundreds of masked gunmen loyal to Al Qaeda cruised this capital of their self-declared state, hauling Shiite Muslims from their homes and leaving bodies in the dusty, trash-strewn streets. They set up a religious court and prisons, aid stations and food stores. And they imposed their fundamentalist interpretation of Islam on a population that was mostly too poor to flee and too terrified to resist. U.S.
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