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Stephen Tukel

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October 8, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Tukel and Joshua Horwitz, environmental publishers, weren't upset when they saw the unprecedented deluge of eco-books pouring off the nation's presses last spring for Earth Day '90. They weren't worried about the competition, even though their own books were still waiting in the wings. "Our feeling was the more books the better," Tukel said. "We're doing something different. We're in it for the long haul."
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BOOKS
October 12, 1997 | RICHARD WRANGHAM, Richard Wrangham is the author of "Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence."
Cogito, ergo sum may sound harmless enough, but in the wrong hands, Descartes' maxim can be devastating. Humans have minds, it says, whereas other animals merely have bodies. Cartesian dualism allows us to suck the air out of a space capsule to see how long it takes an oxygen-deprived chimpanzee to die, isolate infant chimpanzees in cages for years to see the effects of maternal deprivation or give them polio or hepatitis or HIV. They're just animals, after all.
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BOOKS
October 12, 1997 | RICHARD WRANGHAM, Richard Wrangham is the author of "Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence."
Cogito, ergo sum may sound harmless enough, but in the wrong hands, Descartes' maxim can be devastating. Humans have minds, it says, whereas other animals merely have bodies. Cartesian dualism allows us to suck the air out of a space capsule to see how long it takes an oxygen-deprived chimpanzee to die, isolate infant chimpanzees in cages for years to see the effects of maternal deprivation or give them polio or hepatitis or HIV. They're just animals, after all.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Tukel and Joshua Horwitz, environmental publishers, weren't upset when they saw the unprecedented deluge of eco-books pouring off the nation's presses last spring for Earth Day '90. They weren't worried about the competition, even though their own books were still waiting in the wings. "Our feeling was the more books the better," Tukel said. "We're doing something different. We're in it for the long haul."
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, the timing seemed perfect for everybody. It was early last March, and William Slater and Peter Orzechowski had sold the manuscript for their "Drought Busters" consumer handbook on the first try. Venice publishers Joshua Horwitz and Stephen Tukel had also been feeling smug over buying the book, which had come in--miraculously, they thought--over their transom at Living Planet Press.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's November 1961. Enos is strapped into his chair in the Atlas rocket, hurtling through space. The 1 1/2-year-old chimp has been through a grueling 16 weeks of training. He's been tested, groomed and grilled to operate the rocket controls, in coordination with ground control, through a training strategy of rewards and electric shock punishments that guided him through the labyrinth of switches and buttons. Suddenly, it's the moment of truth. The equipment malfunctions.
BOOKS
December 14, 1997
Editor's Note: The following reviews represent the best books of 1997 in the judgment of our contributors. Their original reviews have been edited and condensed for reasons of space. ALFRED KAZIN REQUIRED READING: Why Our American Classics Matter Now. By Andrew Delbanco . Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 226 pp., $24 Although he is a professor of English in full standing, Andrew Delbanco happily reads and teaches our American literary classics with intense excitement.
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