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Stephen Wolfram

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SCIENCE
July 9, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Wolfram was in his Caltech office more than 20 years ago, working late on an autumn evening, when he saw something on his computer screen that shocked and confused him. The 21-year-old physicist, already a member of the Caltech faculty, had been experimenting with elementary computer programs. He expected them to generate simple, predictable patterns: checkerboards or nested triangles. Instead, one of the programs spawned complex images that resembled the veins in a leaf.
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SCIENCE
July 9, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Wolfram was in his Caltech office more than 20 years ago, working late on an autumn evening, when he saw something on his computer screen that shocked and confused him. The 21-year-old physicist, already a member of the Caltech faculty, had been experimenting with elementary computer programs. He expected them to generate simple, predictable patterns: checkerboards or nested triangles. Instead, one of the programs spawned complex images that resembled the veins in a leaf.
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NEWS
June 9, 2002 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
To the countless would-be scientists whose careers foundered on the baffling shoals of calculus, a brilliant physicist who earned his Ph.D. at 20 and snagged a MacArthur "genius" grant at 22 seems an unlikely source of comfort. Yet Stephen Wolfram has some inspiring words for the mathematically challenged. In his self-published and unexpectedly popular book, Wolfram argues that sophisticated mathematics has led science astray in its effort to explain the natural world. "A New Kind of Science" proposes that simple rules, not complex equations, are the key to such profound scientific mysteries as the structure of the universe and the incredible diversity of life on Earth.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
To the countless would-be scientists whose careers foundered on the baffling shoals of calculus, a brilliant physicist who earned his Ph.D. at 20 and snagged a MacArthur "genius" grant at 22 seems an unlikely source of comfort. Yet Stephen Wolfram has some inspiring words for the mathematically challenged. In his self-published and unexpectedly popular book, Wolfram argues that sophisticated mathematics has led science astray in its effort to explain the natural world. "A New Kind of Science" proposes that simple rules, not complex equations, are the key to such profound scientific mysteries as the structure of the universe and the incredible diversity of life on Earth.
OPINION
July 14, 2002
Re "The Code of the Cosmos," July 9: Stephen Wolfram's theory seems to be an attempt to develop a GUT, or grand unified theory, long sought by many as a "holy grail." Such a theory would necessarily integrate all of the current, disparate theories (gravity, electromagnetism, et al.), each of which may explain some smaller part of the cosmos. The code that Wolfram is seeking may be the cosmos' equivalent of DNA. Such "universal DNA" as an ingredient of the big bang might help explain how a singularity could contain sufficient inconsistency to produce such a varied universe, and not the homogeneous sphere that one might expect.
BOOKS
July 7, 2002
*--* Southern California Rating FICTION Last Week Weeks on List *--* *--* 1 THE EMPEROR OF OCEAN PARK by Stephen L. Carter (Alfred A. 1 3 Knopf: $26.95) A professor is drawn into the underworld of Washington, D.C., by the secrets of his late father, a federal judge 2 THE NANNY DIARIES by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus 2 17 (St. Martin's: $24.95) The travails of an overworked and underappreciated Park Avenue caregiver 3 HARD EIGHT by Janet Evanovich (St. Martin's: $25.
BOOKS
February 23, 2003
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 The King of Torts by John Grisham (Doubleday: $27.95) The 5 2 case of a young man charged in a street killing turns out to be tied to a conspiracy involving a pharmaceutical giant 2 The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold (Little, Brown: $21.95) 1 34 A murdered girl tells the story of her grieving family still learning to cope, the killer and the detective who hunts him 3 Pattern Recognition by William Gibson (Putnam: $25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988 | LEE DEMBART, Dembart is a Times staff writer and
The word "computer" is something of a misnomer. Up till now, computers have not done very much computation. But last week, Stephen Wolfram, physicist extraordinaire and sometime enfant terrible, unveiled a new mathematics program that gives desk-top computers the power to do arithmetic, algebra, calculus, symbol manipulation and graphics--greater capability than they have ever had before. And it is lightning fast.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Allen Barra
A good subtitle for "Newton's Football" might be "Pigskin Freakonomics. " This extraordinary collaboration between Allen St. John, columnist for Forbes.com and author of "The Billion Dollar Game," and Ainissa G. Ramirez, a PhD in materials science and engineering and author of "Save Our Science," aims at nothing less than "finding the common ground between Issac Newton and Vince Lombardi, between Bill Walsh and Erwin Schrodinger. " You might have thought that football coaches and scientists are such radically different species that they couldn't pass the salt at the dinner table without missing the connection.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2009 | David Sarno
How long does it take to get to Saturn at, say, the speed of light? With Wolfram Alpha, the online "computational knowledge engine" that launched Monday, the answer -- 75 minutes -- can be found in a fraction of a second. Web users can submit customized questions to the service, and Wolfram Alpha will try to work out the answer on the fly. The chance that a healthy 35-year-old woman will contract heart disease in the next 10 years? One in 167. The temperature in Washington, D.C.
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