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Stephen Yagman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A prominent civil rights lawyer convicted of tax evasion, bankruptcy fraud and money laundering has been denied bail. Stephen Yagman is set to begin a three-year prison sentence this month. He asked to remain free on bail while he appeals his conviction, but a federal judge in Los Angeles rejected the request Wednesday. Yagman has the option of appealing the ruling to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Yagman, 63, has filed dozens of lawsuits against the LAPD, alleging abuse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A prominent civil rights lawyer convicted of tax evasion, bankruptcy fraud and money laundering has been denied bail. Stephen Yagman is set to begin a three-year prison sentence this month. He asked to remain free on bail while he appeals his conviction, but a federal judge in Los Angeles rejected the request Wednesday. Yagman has the option of appealing the ruling to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Yagman, 63, has filed dozens of lawsuits against the LAPD, alleging abuse.
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MAGAZINE
August 2, 1998
Civil rights attorney Stephen Yagman ought to be center-stage in the pantheon of genuine American heroes ("One Angry Man," by Hector Tobar, June 28). His zealous, uncompromising defense of our constitutional rights and guarantees--indeed our natural right to due process and equitable treatment by the police apparatus of the state--is as valuable a contribution as any to the evolution of America as a free, open and civilized society. One need look no further than the Rodney G. King case to understand that too many cops are congenital bullies and megalomaniacs who have found the ideal means of living out their pathological childhood fantasies of power and domination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2007 | Scott Glover, Times Staff Writer
The sentencing of Venice Beach civil rights attorney Stephen Yagman on tax evasion, bankruptcy fraud and money laundering convictions was postponed until Monday after a hearing Friday in federal court in Los Angeles. U.S. District Court Judge Stephen V. Wilson put off the sentencing after hours of argument by Yagman's lawyers, who contested a federal probation report that recommended he spend at least 6 1/2 years in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The polar extremes of Los Angeles' legal community--the insider-deal-maker-mayor, Richard Riordan, and the outsider-anti-cop-street-fighter, Stephen Yagman--are scheduled to face off in sworn testimony Thursday, with Yagman gearing up to put the mayor through the mill over a long-running police shooting case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding that Stephen Yagman mishandled various financial aspects of a case, a state bar panel has recommended that the controversial Venice attorney be suspended from practice for a year. The panel, expanding on a decision by a state bar court judge, found that Yagman had, among other things, failed to inform his clients of a settlement offer, "entered into an illegal fee agreement and collected an unconscionable fee," and failed to promptly pay clients their jury award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court judge--part of a panel considering whether to uphold the punishment of an outspoken attorney who lambasted a judge--on Wednesday questioned whether his judicial brethren should enjoy special protection against such criticism. "Why are judges so special?" asked Judge Alex Kozinski. "We are just public officials. We get a public paycheck, just like prosecutors. Why does a whole different standard apply to attacks on judges?" the judge said at a packed hearing in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Civil rights lawyer Stephen Yagman said Friday that he called a Los Angeles federal judge "anti-Semitic" because he had a good-faith belief that the accusation was true. The Venice attorney was testifying in a virtually unprecedented hearing at which an obscure disciplinary committee is seeking to bar him from practicing in federal court in seven Southern California counties because he accused U.S. District Judge William D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Facing the harshest professional discipline of his career, Stephen Yagman was taking an uncharacteristic course. He was keeping his mouth shut. Such circumspection was a change of pace for the veteran Venice civil rights lawyer, whose proclivity for outrageous comments landed him in trouble in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An attorney who won a $44,000 civil rights judgment against Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates and nine officers said Thursday the City Council made a possibly costly mistake in deciding to pay the damages for them, against the jury's wishes. The council members themselves can now be held liable in the case, attorney Stephen Yagman said. A city attorney disputed Yagman's claim but declined to comment in detail because the case is continuing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2007 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
When he was arraigned last July, civil rights attorney Stephen Yagman wore shoes adorned with the skull and crossbones and turned the traditional "not guilty" plea upside down by pleading "presumed innocent." But Wednesday, a more subdued Yagman, in a gray suit and tie, showed deference to the federal justice system he so often criticized as his trial for tax evasion and bankruptcy fraud began. The combative litigator, famed for his police abuse cases, sat quietly as Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2006 | Henry Weinstein and Moises Mendoza, Times Staff Writers
Embattled federal Judge Manuel L. Real told a congressional subcommittee Thursday that he did nothing wrong in seizing a bankruptcy case from another judge, insisting he was the victim of "a personal vendetta" by Venice civil rights lawyer Stephen Yagman. Real, who has been a U.S. district judge in Los Angeles since 1966, spoke before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet and Intellectual Property, which is considering his possible impeachment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2006 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
In characteristic form, Stephen Yagman, the pugnacious civil rights attorney who has challenged police conduct for nearly three decades, declared, "Presumed innocent," Monday when asked how he pleaded to federal charges of tax evasion, bankruptcy fraud and money laundering. "Pleading 'not guilty' turns the presumption of innocence on its head in a way semantically favorable to the prosecution," Yagman told U.S. Magistrate Rosalyn M. Chapman in Los Angeles federal court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2006 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Civil rights attorney Stephen Yagman, whose long career challenging police brutality has occasionally been derailed by run-ins with the State Bar and several federal judges, was indicted Friday on charges of income tax evasion, bankruptcy fraud and money laundering. A 19-count indictment, returned by a federal grand jury on June 1, was unsealed a day after Yagman, 61, finished defending a woman charged with a methamphetamine offense in Riverside County. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2006 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Bernard C. Parks, the former Los Angeles police chief and now a city councilman, has been hauled into court so many times by attorney Stephen Yagman he's lost count. William J. Bratton, the current chief, once took a helicopter to Orange County for a few minutes of testimony in a Yagman case. Bratton was on call again last week, although in the end was not compelled to take the stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the federal government of subverting democratic values, Los Angeles lawyers asked an appellate court Wednesday to allow them to represent more than 500 foreign prisoners detained at Guantanamo Bay naval base in Cuba in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Who are we?" asked civil rights attorney Stephen Yagman, speaking before a three-member panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. "The answer is we're Americans. We're not them." He asserted that if the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Venice civil rights lawyer Stephen Yagman contends that he violated no canon of ethics and should not be sanctioned for his withering criticism of U.S. District Judge William D. Keller, whom he accused of being anti-Semitic, drunk on the bench, "ignorant, dishonest . . . a bully and one of the worst judges in the United States." Yagman took this position on his comments in a brief filed in Los Angeles federal court that became available Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan got his scheduled grilling from civil rights lawyer Stephen Yagman on Thursday, but the mayor elected to take their encounter behind closed doors. Later, Riordan described Yagman as a "bright, tough, relentless questioner" and said he had emerged from the deposition respecting him, but not liking him. "I haven't had so much fun since my dog died," Riordan said. "It was a tough deposition by an experienced lawyer. I came away respecting his ability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorney Stephen Yagman offered Tuesday to drop a claim for triple damages in a federal racketeering lawsuit against Rampart police officers. In exchange, he said, the city must quit relying on a one-year statute of limitations to block lawsuits by victims in the police abuse scandal. He also demanded that the city reverse its position that only defendants whose convictions have been overturned can sue for false arrest. Yagman made his proposal in a blistering letter to City Atty. James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000
Re "Blame Parks for Rampart Scandal," by Stephen Yagman, Commentary, April 12: LAPD Chief Bernard Parks is responsible for the public's faith in the department. After the Christopher Commission report, LAPD senior lead officers in their community liaison positions were there to help with the healing process. Senior leads brought us together, helped return our faith in the department and gave us familiarity, continuity and trust. Since communities have lost touch with their senior leads, we've been thrown back 20 years to cops on one side and citizens on the other.
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