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Stephens Kangaroo Rat

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NEWS
February 10, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To many residents, it's just a 3-inch-high rodent that runs on its hind legs. But this tiny creature, Stephens' kangaroo rat, has been declared an endangered species, making development on its barren grassland habitat subject to fines and even prison terms. Its recent discovery in this rural town has been to the frustration of developers--and to the amusement of many residents. "To me, a rat is a rat," Norco City Councilman Bill Vaughan said. "It's more of a joke than anything else. . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Under a warm moon and a gentle wind, three dozen Stephens' kangaroo rats burrowed into their new homes in rural Riverside County last week. There were no coyotes present. That was good for the kangaroo rats. The U.S. government considers the rats a protected species; the coyotes consider them delicious. Maybe the coyotes were scared off by mountain lion urine that had been sprinkled around the Southwestern Riverside County Multi-Species Reserve, an expanse of shrubby hills between Diamond Valley Lake and Lake Skinner.
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NEWS
September 2, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There have been several famous walls in history: the Great Wall of China, the Berlin Wall, the Wailing Wall. Now comes the $360,000 K-Rat Wall in Riverside. It gets its name from the Stephens' kangaroo rat--a nocturnal, burrow-dwelling, chipmunk-like rodent that propels itself kangaroo-style on powerful hind legs. Those powerful legs have gotten the species into powerful trouble.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of Southern California's great environmental mysteries: an orange-and-black butterfly, once so commonplace as to be ignored by collectors, is now on the verge of disappearing. No one knows why the Quino checkerspot is becoming extinct, or how to save it. Tougher still is how and where to track it down.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1991 | John O'Dell Times staff writer
Delisting the Rat: The Riverside County Farm Bureau is seeking to remove the Stephens' kangaroo rat from the federal endangered species list. Dan Hollingsworth, the bureau's legislative committee chairman, told the Riverside County Board of Supervisors during its meeting earlier this week that the rodent has been found in places well outside the western Riverside County area said to be its sole habitat.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Water District, worried that an endangered rodent could block a bevy of vital water supply projects in Riverside County, has launched a study the district hopes will prove the Stephens kangaroo rat can be trapped and successfully relocated.
REAL ESTATE
August 13, 1989
This is in response to Charles Bragg's comments (Letters, July 23) on my letter regarding the Stephens' kangaroo rat. My comments regarding the subspecies was not to suggest they be destroyed, but rather questioning if the subspecies was something that deserves saving. There is wide disagreement among biologists over how to distinguish one kangaroo rat from another. Maybe they really are not different at all. If we applied the same distinctions to people, e.g.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after state agricultural officials pledged not to grant any more exemptions from their aerial assault on the Mediterranean fruit fly, they have done it again--this time for the kangaroo rat. At the request of U.S. wildlife agents who feared that malathion might harm the endangered species, state officials have agreed to spray around a five-square-mile area near Woodcrest in Riverside County where the rats roam wild on sparse, open grasslands.
REAL ESTATE
June 18, 1989 | JEANNE BOYER, Jeanne Boyer is a Riverside free-lance writer. and
Actor Jimmy Cagney couldn't have said it with more passion: "You dirty rat!" is the cry from developers now echoing across Riverside County, as a struggle to save an endangered rodent is threatening the building boom in one of the nation's fastest-growing areas. As of last Halloween, it is a federal offense to harm the Stephens' kangaroo rat, a little creature that biologists say is more closely related to squirrels than to common rats. The problem is, the rat prefers the same kind of flat land that developers like, and it only thrives in a limited area, chiefly western Riverside County.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after red-faced state agriculture officials promised to grant no more exemptions from their aerial assault on the Mediterranean fruit fly, they have done it again--this time for the kangaroo rat. At the request of U.S. wildlife agents who feared that malathion might harm the endangered species, state officials have agreed not to spray a 5-square-mile area near Woodcrest in Riverside County where the rats roam wild on sparse grasslands.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | PATRICK J. Mc DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backlash against growth may be increasingly common in the nation's suburbs, but here in Moreno Valley--notorious for its explosive expansion in the past decade--that sentiment has been at odds with the pro-development ethos. So it was surprising on a recent evening to find a crowd descending on City Hall to deliver the message that, even here, enough may be enough.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1991 | John O'Dell Times staff writer
Delisting the Rat: The Riverside County Farm Bureau is seeking to remove the Stephens' kangaroo rat from the federal endangered species list. Dan Hollingsworth, the bureau's legislative committee chairman, told the Riverside County Board of Supervisors during its meeting earlier this week that the rodent has been found in places well outside the western Riverside County area said to be its sole habitat.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There have been several famous walls in history: the Great Wall of China, the Berlin Wall, the Wailing Wall. Now comes the $360,000 K-Rat Wall in Riverside. It gets its name from the Stephens' kangaroo rat--a nocturnal, burrow-dwelling, chipmunk-like rodent that propels itself kangaroo-style on powerful hind legs. Those powerful legs have gotten the species into powerful trouble.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To many residents, it's just a 3-inch-high rodent that runs on its hind legs. But this tiny creature, Stephens' kangaroo rat, has been declared an endangered species, making development on its barren grassland habitat subject to fines and even prison terms. Its recent discovery in this rural town has been to the frustration of developers--and to the amusement of many residents. "To me, a rat is a rat," Norco City Councilman Bill Vaughan said. "It's more of a joke than anything else. . . .
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Water District, worried that an endangered rodent could block a bevy of vital water supply projects in Riverside County, has launched a study the district hopes will prove the Stephens kangaroo rat can be trapped and successfully relocated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after state agricultural officials pledged not to grant any more exemptions from their aerial assault on the Mediterranean fruit fly, they have done it again--this time for the kangaroo rat. At the request of U.S. wildlife agents who feared that malathion might harm the endangered species, state officials have agreed to spray around a five-square-mile area near Woodcrest in Riverside County where the rats roam wild on sparse, open grasslands.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | PATRICK J. Mc DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backlash against growth may be increasingly common in the nation's suburbs, but here in Moreno Valley--notorious for its explosive expansion in the past decade--that sentiment has been at odds with the pro-development ethos. So it was surprising on a recent evening to find a crowd descending on City Hall to deliver the message that, even here, enough may be enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Under a warm moon and a gentle wind, three dozen Stephens' kangaroo rats burrowed into their new homes in rural Riverside County last week. There were no coyotes present. That was good for the kangaroo rats. The U.S. government considers the rats a protected species; the coyotes consider them delicious. Maybe the coyotes were scared off by mountain lion urine that had been sprinkled around the Southwestern Riverside County Multi-Species Reserve, an expanse of shrubby hills between Diamond Valley Lake and Lake Skinner.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after red-faced state agriculture officials promised to grant no more exemptions from their aerial assault on the Mediterranean fruit fly, they have done it again--this time for the kangaroo rat. At the request of U.S. wildlife agents who feared that malathion might harm the endangered species, state officials have agreed not to spray a 5-square-mile area near Woodcrest in Riverside County where the rats roam wild on sparse grasslands.
REAL ESTATE
August 13, 1989
This is in response to Charles Bragg's comments (Letters, July 23) on my letter regarding the Stephens' kangaroo rat. My comments regarding the subspecies was not to suggest they be destroyed, but rather questioning if the subspecies was something that deserves saving. There is wide disagreement among biologists over how to distinguish one kangaroo rat from another. Maybe they really are not different at all. If we applied the same distinctions to people, e.g.
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