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May 11, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
For theaters in the 1980s, making poverty look real is a pricey proposition. By the time Steppenwolf Theatre Company unveils its newly revised version of "The Grapes of Wrath" at La Jolla Playhouse on Sunday, nearly $1 million will have been spent translating John Steinbeck's 50-year-old Pulitzer-Prize winning novel about migrant farm workers to the stage. Half of that was spent by Steppenwolf in its original 41-character Chicago production; the Playhouse ponied up $450,000 for Steppenwolf's revised (read "pared-down")
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December 1, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tracy Letts has his hands full these days writing plays and preparing for the release of the movie version of his Pulitzer-Prize-winning drama, "August: Osage County. " But he's added another formidable task to his agenda: elucidating Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" for a 21st century audience. Playwrights often shed indirect light on their predecessors. Harold Pinter's taut language, for example, helped us to better appreciate Samuel Beckett's minimalist aesthetics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
It's a long, hard road to rock 'n' roll stardom. And just because you've already walked it once doesn't make it any easier the second time around. In fact, said John Kay of Steppenwolf, it might make it even harder--and longer. In the late '60s and early '70s, Steppenwolf helped define heavy metal with a succession of chart-toppers--"Born to be Wild," "Magic Carpet Ride" and "The Pusher" were the biggest--that combined grinding melodies and rock-solid rhythms. Then they broke up.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
TV and film actor Gary Cole, 54, returns to his stage roots in the Geffen Playhouse production of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tracy Letts' dark comedy "Superior Donuts," which begins performances Tuesday and runs through July 10. Let's talk about Steppenwolf since that's where "Superior Donuts" started, and you and Tracy Letts and Geffen Artistic Director Randall Arney, who directed this production, all go back to Steppenwolf. I was officially a member in '86, but my first show there was in 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
TV and film actor Gary Cole, 54, returns to his stage roots in the Geffen Playhouse production of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tracy Letts' dark comedy "Superior Donuts," which begins performances Tuesday and runs through July 10. Let's talk about Steppenwolf since that's where "Superior Donuts" started, and you and Tracy Letts and Geffen Artistic Director Randall Arney, who directed this production, all go back to Steppenwolf. I was officially a member in '86, but my first show there was in 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008
Back to the prairie: Melissa Gilbert, who played Laura Ingalls in the 1970s TV series "Little House on the Prairie," will portray the frontier character's mother in a musical version of the "Little House" books that will open at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis this summer. -- Moving on: Stephen Eich, a Steppenwolf Theatre Company veteran who came to Westwood's Geffen Playhouse as managing director in 2000, will end his tenure there in mid-June to pursue other theatrical projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2009 | Chris Jones, Jones is drama critic of the Chicago Tribune.
When playwright Tracy Letts walked into New York rehearsals for the touring production of his "August: Osage County" earlier this summer, he did not find the fellow Steppenwolf Theatre Company ensemble members who blew away brittle New York aesthetes with their gale-force, Chicago-style acting in Letts' devastating Broadway play. Although a few of the touring cast members -- mostly notably, the widely acclaimed Estelle Parsons -- had done the show as Broadway replacements during the long New York run, and many have ties to both Letts and other Chicago theaters, the famously dysfunctional Westons of Oklahoma are being played on the road by none of the original cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1985 | CLARKE TAYLOR
John Malkovich arrived in New York two years ago "with enough clothes to last about a week." Like legions of actors who have come here and will be coming in the future, he had modest hopes of finding a niche on the New York stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tracy Letts has his hands full these days writing plays and preparing for the release of the movie version of his Pulitzer-Prize-winning drama, "August: Osage County. " But he's added another formidable task to his agenda: elucidating Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" for a 21st century audience. Playwrights often shed indirect light on their predecessors. Harold Pinter's taut language, for example, helped us to better appreciate Samuel Beckett's minimalist aesthetics.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Chris Jones
When the playwright-actor Tracy Letts and his longtime muse Amy Morton officially ignite George and Martha's famous Fun and Games in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" here this weekend , it will mark the first time a play by Edward Albee has appeared on the stage of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company. "Not for lack of trying. Not for lack of trying," said Martha Lavey, the famously feisty Chicago's company's artistic director. "We approached Mr. Albee about this play many times. " "I think," said Letts, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "August: Osage County," in a separate interview last week outside the rehearsal room where "Woolf" was being wrought, "that Mr. Albee was probably aware of Steppenwolf in its early days, with its reputation as a wild, rock 'n' roll kind of theater and thought, 'Well, that's great, but not with one of my plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Chris Jones
When the playwright-actor Tracy Letts and his longtime muse Amy Morton officially ignite George and Martha's famous Fun and Games in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" here this weekend , it will mark the first time a play by Edward Albee has appeared on the stage of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company. "Not for lack of trying. Not for lack of trying," said Martha Lavey, the famously feisty Chicago's company's artistic director. "We approached Mr. Albee about this play many times. " "I think," said Letts, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "August: Osage County," in a separate interview last week outside the rehearsal room where "Woolf" was being wrought, "that Mr. Albee was probably aware of Steppenwolf in its early days, with its reputation as a wild, rock 'n' roll kind of theater and thought, 'Well, that's great, but not with one of my plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2009 | Chris Jones, Jones is drama critic of the Chicago Tribune.
When playwright Tracy Letts walked into New York rehearsals for the touring production of his "August: Osage County" earlier this summer, he did not find the fellow Steppenwolf Theatre Company ensemble members who blew away brittle New York aesthetes with their gale-force, Chicago-style acting in Letts' devastating Broadway play. Although a few of the touring cast members -- mostly notably, the widely acclaimed Estelle Parsons -- had done the show as Broadway replacements during the long New York run, and many have ties to both Letts and other Chicago theaters, the famously dysfunctional Westons of Oklahoma are being played on the road by none of the original cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008
Back to the prairie: Melissa Gilbert, who played Laura Ingalls in the 1970s TV series "Little House on the Prairie," will portray the frontier character's mother in a musical version of the "Little House" books that will open at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis this summer. -- Moving on: Stephen Eich, a Steppenwolf Theatre Company veteran who came to Westwood's Geffen Playhouse as managing director in 2000, will end his tenure there in mid-June to pursue other theatrical projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2008 | Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Tracy Letts' soul never strays too far from the Midwest. Born and raised in southern Oklahoma, the playwright made it to New York by way of Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre Company. And he's set his hit Broadway play, "August: Osage County," on the Oklahoma plains. After its Dec. 4 debut at the Imperial Theatre, critics hailed it as the best American play in decades and talk of Tony and Pulitzer Prize nominations fluttered along the Great White Way.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2001 | HUGH HART, Los Angeles writer Hugh Hart is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Imagine Bruce Willis and Jeremy Irons sitting politely on a sofa, and you'll have a rough picture of the talented odd couple from Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre who are now calling the shots at the Geffen Playhouse. Managing director Steve Eich, the one with the shaved pate, was hired in September to run the business side of the Westwood operation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Randall Arney, artistic director of Chicago's famed Steppenwolf Theatre from 1987 to 1995, has been named to the same position at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood. But Gilbert Cates, the producing director of the theater who has made the artistic decisions since the theater began five years ago, isn't leaving. Cates said he invited Arney into the theater's leadership because he wants to spend more time on his own directing projects, including a film this summer as well as plays at the Geffen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Film buffs will have a rare opportunity to hear a film maker analyze his own work when director Fred Haines attends today's screening of his 1974 film "Steppenwolf," based on the Herman Hesse novel. The film is part of the "Psychoanalytic Investigation of the Creative Process in Film, Art, Literature and Music" series sponsored by the UC Irvine Psychiatry Service at Capistrano by the Sea Hospital in Dana Point. The films are being screened at the Edwards University Cinema in Irvine.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
"My agent would like me to be working on a big movie for a major studio," Andie MacDowell said, the hint of an ironic smile on her lips. "But here I am instead." "Here" is Ealing Studios, which emphatically does not qualify as major, and where big movies are simply not made. The lot tells its own story; offices and corridors are painted in drab, institutional colors which recall the decor of Victorian English schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Randall Arney sits in the living room of his new Hancock Park home on the day before Christmas, with his back to the yet-unpacked boxes tucked away in the adjacent dining room. Soft Los Angeles sunlight streams in through arched picture windows, creating a scene quite different from the many Chicago winters he's known. That's not why the quietly congenial director-actor, 41, has just relocated to L.A., but it doesn't hurt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1997 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Every night when the moon is full, I turn into a wolf." --Lon Chaney "Yeah, you and a million other guys . . ." --Lou Costello * For lupine rocker Nick St. Nicholas, it hasn't always been a howl, but he just might be on a roll these days. The bassist for Steppenwolf in the band's heyday, St. Nicholas is still doing that classic rock thing, now with his band Lone Wolf. They play a free show Saturday night at China Sea in Ventura.
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